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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
When Brian Williams enrolled at Howard University in the mid-1980s, he knew little about stepping, a form of rhythmic dance involving hand claps, footsteps and synchronized movements that is synonymous with African-American, Greek-letter college fraternities and sororities. Upon joining a fraternity at Howard he not only learned to step, but he immersed himself in its history and sought to teach others outside college communities about stepping as a form of creative expression. He founded Washington-based Step Afrika, a dance group and nonprofit organization that incorporates step into performances staged around the world, and then teaches step demonstration at schools in rural and urban areas.
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | September 30, 2014
The political practices of the Islamic State are terrifying: kidnapping, ransoming, ethnic cleansing and, of course, beheading. These people must be vanquished. But equally frightening is the group's key premise. Like many reactionary movements, ISIS feeds upon and nurtures the dangerous notion that somehow the world, or at least the parts over which they claim authority, can somehow be restored to an earlier, idyllic era — in this case, the 8th century. ISIS can chop off all the heads members want, but here's a newsflash for them: Try as they might to reverse history, time marches in but one direction.
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FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | October 20, 2007
The Impressionist exhibit opening today at Washington's Phillips Collection features big names and the marquee draw of 17 Monet paintings. But what makes the show really pleasurable is that it's basically about people at the beach. With contributions from the likes of Monet, Mary Cassatt, John Singer Sargent and Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Impressionists by the Sea serves as a reminder of the extent to which art movements depend upon technological and social movements. After railroads were built to coastal towns in northern France in the mid-19th century, vacationing Parisians soon turned humble fishing villages into fashionable resorts.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
This could start something. Let's hope not. A Towson University student, Twitter handle @michonjanieceIV, sent out a tweet Wednesday night politely explaining to her professor that she would not be attending class the next day, in honor of Beyonce's birthday. "On September 4, 1981," the tweet reads in part, "The Lord blessed us all with the Goddess that is Queen Beyonce Knowles-Carter's birthday. Out of respect, I will not be attending class today. " @michonjanieceIV later sent out a second tweet, swearing that she'd meant to save her earlier effort as a draft, but sent it out by mistake.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | September 30, 2014
The political practices of the Islamic State are terrifying: kidnapping, ransoming, ethnic cleansing and, of course, beheading. These people must be vanquished. But equally frightening is the group's key premise. Like many reactionary movements, ISIS feeds upon and nurtures the dangerous notion that somehow the world, or at least the parts over which they claim authority, can somehow be restored to an earlier, idyllic era — in this case, the 8th century. ISIS can chop off all the heads members want, but here's a newsflash for them: Try as they might to reverse history, time marches in but one direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to the Sun | June 12, 2008
During the Columbia Festival of the Arts this month, bodies in motion will honor Latin American traditions through contemporary dance, portray the human experience with jazz accompaniment and employ acrobatics and contraptions in an attempt to defy the laws of physics. The inspirations are different for the three dance companies included in this year's festival lineup, but the founders of Luna Negra Dance Theater, Garth Fagan Dance and STREB share a goal to give audiences something new, insightful and beautiful.
NEWS
By Zachary Peterson and Galen Lande | February 29, 2004
IT'S NOT EASY convincing 18-year-olds that their vote matters. They feel ignored by politicians. And it's just as hard to get politicians to spend scarce time and money on an electorate that refuses to cast a ballot. In the 2000 presidential election, only 32 percent of eligible 18-to-25-year-old voters cast ballots, compared with 58 percent of voters over 25. An increase of only 20 percent among the 25 million 18-to-25-year-old voters would be enough to dramatically change the outcome of an election.
SPORTS
December 8, 2009
Kansas, Texas and Villanova held the top three spots in the Associated Press college basketball poll for the second straight week Monday. For the third consecutive week, at least three teams moved into the Top 25. The Jayhawks (7-0), who beat Alcorn State and UCLA last week, were again a runaway choice at No. 1, receiving all but three first-place votes from the 65-member national media panel. Texas (6-0), which beat Southern California, and Villanova (8-0), which beat Drexel and Maryland, each received one first-place vote.
NEWS
By Firmin DeBrabander | December 29, 2011
As we head into the new year, America's environmental movement is stalled. The topic of climate change is anathema to the Republican presidential candidates, and the incumbent is tepid on the subject at best. The U.S. stands alone among industrialized nations, who all seem to be making progress in switching to alternative energy sources and reducing their carbon emissions. Germany is on track to obtain 80 percent of its energy from renewable sources by 2050; Denmark plans for 100 percent by the same date.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | November 11, 1990
WHEN BILL BENNETT announced his resignation as national drug czar the same day Mr. Bush announced more troops were going to the Persian Gulf, the swifter thinkers here immediately saw it as a combination shot.The president, praising Mr. Bennett, asserted that "We're on the road to victory" against drugs and promised he would remain "on the front lines until this scourge is stopped." Mr. Bennett maintained that during his crusade, the country had turned against drugs.The parlay was obvious: Mr. Bush, with more forces in the Middle East than he apparently knows what to do with, would appoint Mr. Bennett as theater commander.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Rev. Dr. L. Carroll Yingling Jr., a retired United Methodist Church minister and former superintendent of the Baltimore Northwest District, died of cancer Aug. 23 at the Charlestown retirement community. He was 87. "He had a lot of strengths, and he loved the people wherever he served and they returned that love," said the Rev. Lon B. Chesnutt, a longtime friend who retired in 1999 from Hiss Memorial United Methodist Church in Parkville, where he had been pastor for many years.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
Let me say up front that I love my manicures and pedicures. Let me also say I am 83 years old. Somehow, your article "Mini mani pedi" (Aug. 7) struck a really negative chord with me. Where has the women's movement gone when we need it? I had hoped that we were encouraging our daughters to reach for the sky in their pursuits. That developing their minds and their interests to become participating members of our world was what we wanted. Let me also say I am all for looking good and feeling special about yourself; however, I thought we no longer wanted our daughters to strive to be like Barbie?
NEWS
June 27, 2014
When will commentator Jon O'Brien at Catholics for a Free Choice wake up and realize that the 1960s are over and that the women's-freedom-and-birth-control debate has moved past his tired framework ( "Whose freedom are the bishops protecting?" June 19). True, most Catholics still struggle with or even reject the church's demanding teaching on this matter. But that's only the beginning of the story. Younger Catholic women are more sympathetic to the church's teaching than their mothers.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | June 20, 2014
The corner store in a dense, rowhouse-dominated neighborhood was a glorious asset. As I child, I had the luxury of three within a block. There were two drugstores, each with soda fountains, and a classic grocery-delicatessen. There, you could buy a can of tomatoes and a package of TastyKakes and learn the neighborhood news. Some of the proprietors and employees often had the status of beloved neighborhood figures. So when I heard of an effort of re-establish a corner store in Remington, I was heartened.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 3, 2014
It was one of those rare June days in Baltimore - warm and sunny, not yet hot and humid - so you could take a good, long walk through the city without shvitzing or getting terribly distressed. I mean, you could actually feel good about the place. There was a cooling breeze along North Charles, so nice you didn't even feel the after-burn from the buses and delivery trucks in the street. People were strolling, walking dogs, riding bikes, pushing skateboards or waiting for the Charm City Circulator to take them to the Inner Harbor.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Michael Spinosa overflows with enthusiasm about the team that helped his Columbia company figure out new strategies for growth — at no charge. That might not sound like economic development, if your conception of it is multimillion-dollar incentives to tempt big employers to move in. The assistance Spinosa got is a different approach with the same goal: more jobs. Connecting established local companies to expert help — pioneered as "economic gardening" in Littleton, Colo.
NEWS
June 22, 1993
Although one would had to have been sequestered in a cave the past few years to have missed the recession, measures of the economic downturn can still be startling. Take, for instance, the 40,000-square-foot office building for which ground was just broken in Odenton. Consider that it is the first sizable, new office project in Anne Arundel County in two years.That tells you something about how far the economy has risen from the depths of 1991-1992, when the commercial construction business calcified overnight.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
A red-faced state trooper hardly acknowledged Harry Belafonte before a 1967 performance at the University of Baltimore during heat of the civil rights movement. After the show, part of a tour with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., an envelope from the trooper awaited the famous black calypso singer and activist at the front desk of the fieldhouse. Inside were six bullets and a letter. "After having met and heard Dr. King and you, I will never fire a weapon ever again," Belafonte said the trooper wrote.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Ralph Dawson Matthews Jr., a former managing editor of the Baltimore Afro-American who worked closely with Malcolm X in the early 1960s and once shared a house with a young Miles Davis, died April 3 at the Adelphi House assisted living facility in Adelphi, Prince George's County. Mr. Dawson died of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, or COPD. He was 86. "Ralph was always very inquisitive," remembered Harry Peaker, a retired mathematician who grew up with Mr. Matthews in Northwest Baltimore.
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