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NEWS
December 2, 1990
The trial of Daniel E. Turner, arrested on charges of murder in the March slaying of a 21-year-old Aberdeen Proving Grounds police clerk, has been moved to Baltimore County.Turner of Aberdeen is charged with first-degree murder for the stabbing death of Spec. 4 Bonnie S. Joseph. Turner also is charged with kidnapping, attempted rape, robbery, theft, battery and weapon charges.Turner, 32, was to go on trial in Harford Circuit Court on Jan. 23.The trial in Baltimore County Circuit Court tentatively is set to begin on Feb. 4.Harford State's Attorney's Joseph I. Cassilly is seeking the death penalty if Turner is convicted.
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley and his wife, Katie, are actively house shopping in northern Baltimore and plan to "repatria te " to the city when his term ends. O'Malley said Thursday his youngest son has already switched to a Baltimore school and that the family intends to move to a home near his wife's parents and other family once they leave Annapolis early next year. The house search in Baltimore comes as the two-term Democrat  weighs his future beyond the Sta te House, including a possible bid for the Whi te House in 2016.
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FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1999
As the annual Army-Navy football classic gets under way today at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, some 70,000 fans will witness the 100th clash of the midshipmen from Annapolis and the West Point cadets.Next year, the excitement will be in Baltimore, when the two teams take to the gridiron at PSINet Stadium. It will be the first time that the game will be played locally since 1944.That year, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered that the game be moved to Baltimore's Municipal Stadium on 33rd Street from the West Point and Annapolis campuses.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | March 3, 2014
In my last Baltimore Sun op-ed column , I noted that Baltimore's mayors often have their eye on anything but being the mayor of Baltimore. Obviously, the column struck a nerve with the current Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. In her response , Rawlings-Blake did nothing to counter my claims that she is more focused on her job as Secretary of the Democratic National Committee than she is with being Mayor of Baltimore. Almost as if to prove my point about how her eye is off the ball, I refer you to Sunday's episode of Meet the Press , in which the mayor was one of the guests on the political panel.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 9, 1995
In Houston, Donald Treshman made his name as an anti-abortion militant by organizing invasions of medical offices, staging blockades of abortion clinics and rummaging through trash bins outside women's medical centers in a search for patients' names.Now he's operating his anti-abortion organization Rescue America from a small rented house in Northeast Baltimore, still devoted to the tactics that he says helped slow what he calls a "holocaust at killing sites" in Houston."We've done the most damage to the abortion industry," said Mr. Treshman, whose group was among those found liable in Houston last year for more than $1 million in damages.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
For 20 years, William Buckman and Marjorie Surell have been haunted by how their mother spent the last moments of her life. Lena Buckman was stabbed to death in September 1980, about an hour after she arrived at Surell's Pikesville home to celebrate the Jewish High Holy Days. As activists organize rallies to stop Eugene Colvin-el from being executed for the murder, Buckman and Surell say that their mother's life -- and death -- must be remembered. "The most painful thing is thinking about what the last moments of her life were like," said Buckman, 70, of Northbrook, Ill. "She didn't deserve to die like that.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | August 4, 2007
Marjorie Kurdle, who performed on local stages for nearly four decades and became an assistant to New York producer David Merrick, died of lung cancer July 28 at Stella Maris Hospice. The Towson resident was 68. "Marge was a leading lady in every way," said F. Scott Black, liberal arts dean at the Community College of Baltimore County and a theater director. "She was a Baltimore theater light. With that husky, deep voice, she could belt [out] a song with the best of them." Born Marjorie Sires in Monticello, Iowa, she earned a degree at Stephens College and attended the University of Iowa.
NEWS
June 23, 1999
Dwight E. Genrich, 59, Social Security employeeDwight E. Genrich, a Social Security Administration employee, died Thursday of leukemia at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Butchers Hill resident was 59.For the past three years, he was a reader for the visually impaired at SSA's Metro-West offices in Baltimore. Earlier, he was a glass and silver buyer at Kauffman's department store in Pittsburgh, and a salesman for China Closet in Washington and New York City.He moved to Baltimore in 1981 to open a China Closet store in Harborplace and later was a furniture salesman at Lucas Bros.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2000
Joseph Causin, retired vice president of finance for the Baltimore Colts and former secretary-treasurer of the New York Yankees, died Monday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 88 and lived in Pikesville. Mr. Causin began his career in sports finance with the Miami Seahawks, a forerunner of the Colts, in 1946. After the franchise dissolved and moved to Baltimore as the Colts in 1947, he left and joined the Yankees where he was assistant controller, controller and, finally, secretary and treasurer.
NEWS
May 7, 2006
McKinley "Mack" Thoms, a retired machinist and caterer, died of complications from diabetes Monday at St. Joseph Villa Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Omaha, Neb., where he moved three years ago. The longtime West Baltimore resident was 92. Born in Windfall, N.C., he moved to Baltimore in 1932 and attended city public schools. He retired in 1978 after working for 36 years with Western Electric Works at Point Breeze. He began there as a janitor and left as a wire machinist. Mr. Thoms was also a caterer and often worked through the old Duke & Lou's delicatessen at the Park Lane Shopping Center.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
On NBC's “Meet the Press” today, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake invited gay and lesbian residents of Arizona to move to Baltimore. Asked about vetoed legislation that would have allowed businesses in Arizona to refuse to provide service to gay and lesbian residents, Rawlings-Blake said it “burns [her] up” that people still face discrimination in 2014. She acknowledged the western state likely has better weather than Baltimore, but said the city has a more welcoming attitude toward homosexual residents.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
"Have I ever got a house for you!" The call came a few months ago from Matt Knoepfle, co-owner with his brother, Mike Knoepfle, of the construction company Building Character LLC. That remark is always an invitation to be amazed at a challenging project that has come to fruition. The brothers are in the business of buying up Baltimore's old and crumbling properties (often in the most sought-after downtown neighborhoods) and adaptively reusing them. This particular property, the subject of Matt Knoepfle's call, was the conversion of a late 19th-century carriage repair shop in Federal Hill into a single-family home on two levels, with over 3,000 square feet of living space.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
State corrections secretary Gary D. Maynard ordered polygraph tests Friday of top administrators and "integrity reviews" of every employee at the Baltimore City Detention Center in an effort to root out corruption at the jail. Maynard has moved his office to the facility from Towson to oversee a review of leadership, staff and operations amid allegations that the Black Guerrilla Family gang developed broad power inside the jail, a spokesman said. More than two dozen inmates and correctional officers in the city jail are charged in a scheme that officials say involved the smuggling of drugs and other contraband, including cellphones, into the facility.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Selling a house is rarely easy and quick, but the transaction for the three-story end-of-group brick rowhouse at 200 Warren Ave.e in Federal Hill was just that. The property listed and sold simultaneously, closing for $950,000 after being offered at $995,000. Little wonder. The home was built just five years ago in the same architectural style and detail as the older homes around it. Additionally, it is within walking distance to the Inner Harbor and shops and restaurants on Light and Charles streets.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
After a two-year detour to New York City, the ceremony to announce the winner of the nation's most lucrative undergraduate literary award, the Sophie Kerr Prize, will be held in Baltimore this year. The decision marks the second time in three years that Washington College officials have moved the event, which was a staple of commencement on the school's Chestertown campus for the competition's first 43 years. The event was so successful in New York the past two years that chapters of the college's alumni association around the country put in bids to host future announcements, Washington College President Mitchell Reiss said.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | February 15, 2013
Major League Soccer's D.C. United is no longer exploring the possibility of moving to Baltimore, according to The Washington Post. The franchise had flirted with the city as it attempted to convince some government entity to give it a favorable deal on a new stadium. But the team's managing partner, Jason Levien, told The Post that "the stars are aligning in a good way for us" in D.C. and that the team would focus on financing a project there with city assistance on infrastructure costs.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | August 24, 2007
Vincent Vizachero just moved to Baltimore from Houston, where he relied on a Harris County Web site for interactive rainfall maps. "It is handy in storms, of course, but also for gardening," he says. "Do you know of anything like this for Baltimore?" Nothing as detailed as Harris County's, but the NWS has rain data maps at www.erh.noaa.gov/lwx/hydro/precip/There is similar data, from the River Forecast Center, at www.erh.noaa.gov/marfc/Maps/precip.html# daily Better still, spring for a rain gauge.
NEWS
October 29, 2003
Bettie Harrison, a West Baltimore homemaker, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at Genesis Eldercare Randallstown Center. She was 83. Born Bettie Bullock in Henderson, N.C., she attended schools there and moved to Baltimore in 1949. A year later, she married Charles B. Harrison, a longshoreman. Her husband died in 1990. For many years, Mrs. Harrison worked as a housekeeper for area families. She was a member of the Gillis Memorial Christian Community Church. Services will be held at noon tomorrow at the Estep Brothers Funeral Home, 1300 Eutaw Place, Baltimore.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | March 19, 2012
Hey, everybody -- give a warm welcome to Yvonne Wenger , a new Baltimore Sun reporter who will be joining me here to blog about (appropriately enough) newcomer issues. She'll take us along as she looks for a place to settle, gets to know the city and navigates the system (MVA registration, anyone?). We hope her experiences will help other newbies and give natives a new way to look at things we've seen a thousand times before. (If you're a new buyer, check out this collection of information and resources while you're at it.)
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