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NEWS
By James E. Rosenbaum | December 5, 2000
CHICAGO -- Across the United States, including in Baltimore, hundreds of high-rise public housing buildings are being demolished. In Baltimore and other cities, the question being asked is whether relocation of the poor from these infamous high-rise "projects" really can make a difference in the lives of the families that move. The answer is undeniably "yes." Indeed, the answer may hold the key to the success of welfare reform, an endeavor in which we all have a stake. A growing body of evidence suggests that demolishing public housing may have minimal benefits if families merely move from high-rise vertical ghettos to horizontal ghettos.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The Maryland Transit Administration police are investigating a recent fight between three people on a Baltimore Metro train, in which a young male appears to try to throw a man he is fighting from the train while it is in motion, a spokesman confirmed. Video of the incident between the man and two younger males was posted on Facebook last week and had been shared more than 5,000 times as of Monday evening. Paul Shepard, a MTA spokesman, said police have the video, but little additional information.
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NEWS
September 1, 1992
Since winning the world chess championship 20 years ago this week, brilliant but temperamental Bobby Fischer has shown as much genius for weird behavior as for moving knights and rooks. He became a recluse, living under fake names in seedy Los Angeles hotels, and joined a fundamentalist Christian sect awaiting a nuclear Armageddon. Other reports render a portrait of an embittered, paranoid megalomaniac who would sooner thumb his nose at the world than show his face.How appropriate, then, for the 49-year-old American chess master, who did much to glamorize and popularize the game, to emerge in Montenegro for his first competitive chess in two decades, all the while breaking United Nations sanctions against Yugoslavia for its role in the Balkan war and drawing United States Treasury threats of up to 10 years in prison and $250,000 in fines for violating the sanctions.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Ann and Dominic Wiker loved life in their Federal Hill home. As a professional couple in their 30s, the neighborhood was ideal - they could walk to most attractions, shops and restaurants. It seemed there was always something fun going on outside their door. Then parenthood happened, and with it came the idea of moving to the suburbs. They would move, but they wouldn't leave Federal Hill. Nine years later, the Wikers - mom, dad, 9-year old Alex and 7-year old Tommy - have, to their delight, become a poster family for raising children in an urban environment.
NEWS
By James Bock | February 4, 1996
BEHIND A controversial plan that would enable poor black Baltimore families to move to middle-class, majority-white areas, there is a simple idea: Living in more affluent neighborhoods can help people escape poverty.The plan touched off a political uproar in Baltimore County last fall when it was proposed to settle a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland on behalf of black public housing tenants. The suit alleges that Baltimore and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
BUSINESS
By James Gallo | April 11, 2004
Fewer people moved last year, new data show, despite record housing sales. According to the Census Bureau, 40.1 million U.S. residents moved in 2003, down from 41 million in 2002. The figures were released recently in a government report, "Geographical Mobility, 2002-2003." But the report found that geographic mobility remains important to those who are moving. Fifty-nine percent of all moves last year were within the same county, and 19 percent were across state boundaries. By comparison, in 1994 the data show that 62 percent of all moves were within the same county, while 16 percent were across state borders.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
So who's going to move the Browns into town? Unload their gear at the team's Owings Mills complex? In daylight, no less?Would the folks who whisked the Colts away 11 years ago care to, um, square things?"
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 28, 1998
MANASSAS, Va. -- The vials of bubonic plague, anthrax and yellow fever sat in squat stainless steel vats, frozen in liquid nitrogen and padlocked in a truck that said "Office Movers." The germs whizzed down the Washington Beltway, trekking quietly through miles of suburbs where an unknowing public slept soundly.At the state line, Maryland state troopers handed off the convoy to Virginia, and a hazardous-materials team and a back-up truck rode alongside. It was a caravan of some of the world's most frightening germs, cruising around the capital city under a full moon on Friday the 13th.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1998
They make caulk. They make spackling compound. They make adhesives and roof sealants and window glazing. And now they've just finished making their biggest product of all -- a new world headquarters near downtown Baltimore.DAP Inc., a 133-year-old manufacturer and marketer of home improvement and building products, just completed the first phase of its corporate move from Dayton, Ohio, to Baltimore's harborfront.It is the first office tenant of the American Can Co. complex in Canton, now undergoing a $30 million transformation into an office and retail center near the water's edge.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1999
It is axiomatic in sports that a team moves to a new stadium and gets rich.It happened to the Orioles. And the Cleveland Indians. And the Washington Redskins. The list is long of teams that have been enriched, mostly by taxpayers, during this decade's boom in stadium building.So what happened to Art Modell?The Ravens owner did the unthinkable when he moved his NFL franchise to Baltimore from Cleveland after the 1995 season. Desperate for revenues and frustrated by his inability to pry a stadium from Ohio politicians, he took up Maryland on its offer to build his team a new home.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
DETROIT -- Buck Showalter has played postseason chess several times before, and like most participants as confident as he is, he has lost more times than not. But in the Orioles' triumphant American League Division Series sweep of the Detroit Tigers, the manager pulled all the right strings. Before the Orioles' series-clinching Game 3 win over the Tigers on Sunday afternoon, he switched the rotation, tabbing right-hander Bud Norris to start. And down to the final two outs, he veered from the unconventional, putting the winning run on base in the bottom of the ninth with an intentional walk before allowing closer Zach Britton to finish a three-game sweep of the Tigers.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Some areas in the Baltimore region flooded overnight after a rainstorm, with tides expected to remain two and a half feet above normal throughout Saturday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service. The National Weather Service issued a coastal flood warning on Saturday through 4 p.m. for Anne Arundel and southern Baltimore counties. A coastal flood warning is also in effect through 2 p.m. for areas along the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay. The warning means flooding is occurring or is expected to occur.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 4, 2014
That's a wise move by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Tony Batts, asking the feds to open a civil rights investigation into police brutality and how cases are handled here. But I have a question: She took office in February 2010; didn't the mayor recognize a troubling trend in settlements and court judgments before she read about them in this newspaper? It's a tough job, running the city; it's hard to keep track of everything. But, as a member of the Board of Estimates since 2007 - first as City Council president, then as mayor - didn't Rawlings-Blake notice damages going to victims of beatings and other appalling police actions?
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Orioles manager Buck Showalter said before Thursday's game that he faced some difficult choices in selecting the team's American League Division Series roster, but he said the decision to add right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez gives his 11-man pitching staff a dynamic that he likes. Showalter selected Jimenez, who struggled throughout the season with his control and was eventually demoted to the bullpen before pitching well in his final three appearances, while leaving left-handers Brian Matusz and T.J. McFarland off the roster against a predominantly right-handed Detroit Tigers lineup.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - As a disappointing season gave way to a tumultuous offseason earlier this year, Maryland men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon waited anxiously for the start of preseason practice. With an overhauled roster and a new offense, the Terps are scheduled to begin practice Friday as they get ready for their first season in the Big Ten Conference. Maryland, which finished 17-15 in its Atlantic Coast Conference farewell and failed for the fourth straight year to make the NCAA tournament, opens the 2014-15 season Nov. 14 against Wagner.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Walter Evan Black Jr., a retired chief judge of the U.S. District Court for Maryland who ruled against the city of Baltimore in its efforts to acquire the Colts after the team moved to Indianapolis, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at his Easton home. The former Roland Park-area resident was 88. During a lengthy career, he ruled against Baltimore in 1985 when it attempted to acquire the Colts football franchise by condemnation. In his ruling, he said the city did not have the power to take the franchise because the team had moved on the night of March 29, 1984, before the day the city had filed its suit.
SPORTS
May 23, 2003
The Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference championship baseball game between No. 5 Calvert Hall and No. 3 St. Paul's has been moved to 4 p.m. Tuesday at Towson University. The MIAA B Conference elimination game featuring Pallotti at Chapelgate has been moved to 3:15 p.m. Tuesday. Both games were scheduled for today.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
To Rick Impallaria, a house is just like a car.At least that's how the 29-year-old Aberdeen resident, in the process of starting up his own body shop in Joppa, explains his other new business venture -- sawing houses in half and moving them to new locations."
SPORTS
Brittany Cheng and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Donnell Whittenburg rocked back and forth on his feet, his eyes boring into the vault table yards ahead of him as he waited behind the start line. It was Aug. 24, Day 2 of the 2014 P&G Gymnastics Championships at Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, and the 20-year-old U.S. men's national team member was playing catch-up after finishing sixth two nights earlier. So Whittenburg, a Baltimore native who will be competing in the world championships starting Friday in Nanning, China, knew he had to nail a rare vault sequence - so dangerous that it was once thought to be impossible - if he wanted to medal.
BUSINESS
Staff Reports and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Ironmark, a printing and image consultant company that was formed through the 2011 merger of Frank Gumpert Printing and Corporate Printing Solutions, announced Monday it will consolidate its Annapolis and Hunt Valley operations into a new headquarters in Howard County. In a news release, company officials said Ironmark's 110 employees will relocate to a 50,000-square-foot facility in Annapolis Junction by Oct. 8. The move comes three years after Frank Gumpert Printing, in Annapolis, and Corporate Printing Solutions, in Hunt Valley, merged to become CPS Gumpert.
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