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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Ashley Montagu wrote a thoroughgoing and readable study of our potty-mouth propensities in The Anatomy of Swearing (1967). Jesse Sheidlower published a book on our favorite expletive, The F Word , in 2009 (reviewed here) . Now Grant Barrett, a lexicographer, a trained professional, not a smut hound, people, wants to know what bad words you favor, when you use them, and with whom. The foundation of his research project is "The Long Bleep Questionnaire," which should not occupy a great deal of your time but which should provide him with valuable fodder.
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NEWS
By Mikita Brottman | September 29, 2014
I was close to 40 when I discovered how love really feels. The object of my affection was a French bulldog, sold to us as Oliver and rechristened Grisby. His color was officially designated "fawn piebald," which meant he had very pretty markings of light brown and white, about half of each. His fur was short and soft, and his large, expressive ears were light brown on the back, dark pink inside and could seem almost translucent in the sunlight. His mouth was wide and when he trotted along with his pink tongue hanging out, it formed a permanent smile.
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NEWS
August 1, 2014
If Gov. Martin O'Malley is so committed to fostering undocumented children who have crossed our border illegally, I suggest he install a number of FEMA trailers on the grounds of Government House ( "O'Malley seeks to house immigrant children in foster homes, not large centers," July 21). Then the governor and the First Lady could foster any number of undocumented immigrant children. The governor has more than enough financial resources to support these foster children in his campaign war chest.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
If Gov. Martin O'Malley is so committed to fostering undocumented children who have crossed our border illegally, I suggest he install a number of FEMA trailers on the grounds of Government House ( "O'Malley seeks to house immigrant children in foster homes, not large centers," July 21). Then the governor and the First Lady could foster any number of undocumented immigrant children. The governor has more than enough financial resources to support these foster children in his campaign war chest.
NEWS
April 24, 1992
Presidential candidate Bill Clinton got a lot of media attention earlier this week for switching the focus of his campaign from his Democratic Party opposition to the Bush administration. He served notice that he'll be campaigning vigorously, using what one adviser referred to as "smash-mouth politics -- right in your face." The Bush campaign, most political observers say, is no slouch when it comes to rough, often negative politicking.The Evening Sun would like your opinion. Does the practice of national politicians attacking one another "smash-mouth" style generate the kind of information voters need to make informed choices?
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | January 21, 2012
Since the New England Patriots moved into Gillette Stadium, no team in the NFL has compiled more wins at home than New England. The Patriots are 67-13 in the regular season there and 8-2 in the postseason. Wintry conditions in the months of December and January and a raucous fan base have helped turn that stadium in Foxborough, Mass., into one of the more imposing venue in which to play. But running back Ricky Williams said the New England mystique is blown out of proportion.
FEATURES
By Nicole Brodeur and Nicole Brodeur,Orange County Register | July 22, 1993
See those little bags of Gummy Bears sitting on the shelves?Aren't they cute? Aren't they sweet? Aren't they just so nice and gummy?Kids would buy them by the kilo if they came without heads. If they tasted like Tabasco sauce or were sold as arms and legs. Call them Grungy Bears, and kids would pack them in their cheeks.These days, candy has to be gross to be good."I like the Tongue Splasher gum," says Brayden Todd, at 13 in the prime of his candy-consumption years. "It turns your whole mouth different colors, so you're spitting pure green or pure red all over the place."
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 2, 1992
A carpenter uses his hands. A philosopher earns a living with her brain. I make a living with my mouth.In a rare moment of insight, I figured out that a large part of my job is to tell people good things to put in their mouths. I base such recommendations on my experience, namely whatever pleasing things I have chomped down on lately. With that in mind, here is a collection of edible items I have recently given my professional treatment. In other words, here's some good stuff.One of the best bites I took recently was into a piece of Virginia trout that had been smoked over apple wood.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | April 17, 1991
LANDOVER -- Some people hate going to the dentist.Then there are hockey players, who couldn't care less.All right, maybe that's an exaggeration. But the Capitals' Michal Pivonka didn't just live to tell the story of how he lost his teeth in a playoff game 10 days ago. He returned the next period.Not impressed? Consider the circumstances. The Caps were on their way to a 6-0 defeat. It wasn't like Pivonka burst out of root-canal surgery to score the tying goal.Laughing gas could explain his mad -- back to the ice, but five shots of novocaine provided his only relief.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | August 14, 2009
The Baltimore sports apparel company Under Armour is introducing a line of mouth gear that it says will not only protect the jaw from hits but will reduce stress to improve athletic performance. UA Performance Mouthwear was developed by Bite Tech Inc., a Minneapolis company that has researched mouth products for athletes. The mouthpiece is for noncontact sports such as baseball, running, golf and tennis, and costs $495. The mouthguard for football, hockey, lacrosse and other contact sports costs $450.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 2, 2014
Chew on these for a minute: "Who are they? Are they these extreme conservatives, who are right-to-life, pro-assault-weapon, anti-gay, is that who they are? Because if that is who they are, and if they are the extreme conservatives, they have no place in the state of New York. Because that is not who New Yorkers are. " - New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, with a directive for New York's GOP candidates last month. "It's not surprising then they get bitter. They cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren't like them.
NEWS
December 1, 2013
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young has to be more cognizant as to what he states at council meetings. At a recent meeting regarding hiring outside consultants to assess the condition of the Baltimore City Police Department, he put his foot in his mouth. His gaffe was to state, "I'm waiting for the commissioner to earn his money" ("Council president unhappy with Baltimore police plan," Nov. 26). Ouch. If there was ever a no-confidence utterance, this one took the cake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
The workmen who built the Great Wall of China ate it for strength. Sailors on early American clipper ships consumed it for health during long voyages. It has tickled Teutonic taste buds and made its way across France, England and the New World. It has never lost its in-your-face pungency, its low-calorie, high-vitamin profile - or, in modern times, its capacity to tease just the right flavors from a hot dog or Reuben sandwich. It's sauerkraut, that tartly tantalizing fermented-cabbage dish that long ago took its oddball place alongside gravy and sweet potatoes as a staple of Baltimore Thanksgiving dinners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Roseanne Glick from Mount Washington was looking for the recipe for a delicious appetizer that someone brought to a potluck cocktail party recently. She said it was a water chestnut wrapped in bacon and coated with some type of a barbecue sauce. She, along with many other guests at the party, found the single-bite morsels surprisingly irresistible. Jan Warren from Havre de Grace had the very recipe Glick had described for barbecue water chestnuts. She said for fun, she sometimes calls them "pig nuts" in honor of the bacon and water chestnuts.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
If you are of delicate sensibilities, you do not want to be in the newsroom of a daily newspaper on deadline, because the swearing then and there is heartfelt, vocal, and repetitious.* But journalists have a complicated relationship with bad words, decorum requiring us in text to resort to "the f-word," "the n-word," initial letters with hyphens or dashes or asterisks, "[expletive deleted]," or the vague but ominous "a racial slur. " But journalists' complicated relationship with taboo words mirrors a larger cultural phenomenon, which Melissa Mohr describes thorooughly and thoughtfully in Holy Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing (Oxford University Press, 336 pages, $24.95)
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
Hand, foot and mouth disease is a common ailment often picked up by children in day care. While it may make for a cranky child, Dr. Benjamin N. Lockshin, a Silver Spring dermatologist who also teaches at Georgetown University and the Johns Hopkins University, said the disease is easily treated. What is hand, foot and mouth disease? Hand, foot and mouth disease is a common, self-limited viral infection typically affecting children ages 2 to 10 years old. What are the symptoms?
ENTERTAINMENT
By BOB SUTER and BOB SUTER,NEWSDAY | June 29, 1998
In 1989, actor Daniel Day-Lewis was catapulted into the ranks of major film stars with his riveting performance as Christy Brown, the Irish artist who, afflicted with cerebral palsy since birth, nevertheless managed to become a highly regarded painter.The film, "My Left Foot," won Day-Lewis an Oscar and provided an inspirational account of one individual's determination to give full expression to his artistic soul despite an overwhelming physical handicap. The instrument of this expression, as the title implies, was his left foot.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | August 17, 1993
When Christel Lipscomb got a good look at the inside of her mouth for the first time, she could barely believe what she saw.There were untreated cavities, leaking fillings, tarter, gum disease -- well, suffice to say there were a lot of things that most people would rather not know about, let alone see, existing in their mouths.Mrs. Lipscomb, a 54-year-old from Glen Burnie, was in the chair of local periodontist Dr. Harold Packman for the first time when she found out what was was going on -- or rather going wrong -- in her mouth.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 24, 2012
A new strain of hand-foot-and-mouth disease has been sickening local children and sending many scared parents to the pediatrician and emergency room, according to Johns Hopkins pediatric dermatologists . But the doctors say most cases are benign and clear up in a little over a week without treatment. Hopkins doctors have seen almost 50 cases in recent months and fielded many more phone calls from parents and doctors, according to Dr. Bernard Cohen, director of pediatric dermatology at Hopkins Children's Center . And he said most cases are probably seen in primary care pediatricians' offices.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 30, 2012
For years, presidents and presidential hopefuls have gone abroad to cast themselves as knowledgeable on world affairs, counting on friendly receptions wherever they go as a respite from the slings and arrows they routinely encounter in campaigning at home. They used to tour what was known as "the 3-I League" - for Ireland, Italy and Israel - in a naked appeal to three of the more prominent ethnic constituencies here, particularly in the Democratic Party. How many votes they got in November for their wanderings was hard to determine, but off they went anyway.
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