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By ROB KASPER | December 24, 1997
CHOCOLATE MOUSSE will be served at our house tonight. It is a Christmas Eve tradition that got off to a shaky start 17 years ago.The recipe, lifted from a cookbook written by Maida Heatter, is a two-step affair. First, you make the chocolate mousse, then you add the whipped-cream topping.My wife started the holiday tradition on a cold December night. She finished the first step, the mousse, but then was interrupted. She had to go to the hospital and give birth.Eventually I got around to completing the second step and carried the finished dessert to Johns Hopkins Hospital where we gazed at our first-born -- a baby boy wearing a Santa cap -- and spooned down chocolate mousse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 19, 2013
Based on its name, you might think MoonShine Tavern is strictly a place that's good for shots and not much else. And while it does deliver on the shots - its moonshine menu is a mile long - with a talented kitchen staff offering sophisticated twists on casual Southern food, Boston Street's newest addition deserves a closer look. During our Thursday-night visit to the Canton spot formerly occupied by The Gin Mill, MoonShine's rustic space - polished a bit, but mostly unchanged since the Gin Mill days - was moderately busy, but with more drinkers than diners.
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FEATURES
By Robin Givhan and Robin Givhan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 6, 1991
We're always a bit fascinated by items that turn up on In and Out lists of America's teen population. After all, we've been trying to figure out New Kids on the Block ever since the pesky fellas started attracting swarms of screaming teen-agers.Irma Zandl's New York City company, Xtreme Inc., specializes in keeping tabs on teen trends. She doesn't really try to explain them the woman obviously values her sanity she just tries to organize them.From her latest survey, Zandl tells us that, like their older counterparts, teen-agers choose black as their top clothing color, followed by other dark colors, such as blue and green.
FEATURES
May 28, 2013
Crab Mousse Woodbrook-Murray Hill Garden Club member Annette Nagel first tried this mousse at a fundraising event in Oxford, Md., where she proclaimed it "divine" and convinced the event planners to give her the recipe. This recipe was reprinted with permission from "The First 50 Years: a Collection of Recipes," a cookbook published by the Woodbrook-Murray Hill Garden Club. Crackers for serving 1 pound crab meat (lump or backfin), cleaned Curry powder to taste 1 cup mayonnaise 1 cup finely chopped celery 1 tablespoon grated onion 1 tablespoon gelatin, softened in 3 tablespoons water 1 can cream of mushroom soup 8 ounces cream cheese 1. Heat soup and cream cheese.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | July 21, 1993
The cloud: a heavenly baked meringue, with a generous mound of chocolate mousse. The taste: You'll be on cloud nine, it's so creamy and rich. For convenience, make the meringue shell a day before serving. Fill it with the mousse and berries within two hours of serving.Strawberry-chocolate meringue3 egg whites1 teaspoon vanilla1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar1 cup sugar1/2 cup toasted finely chopped almonds3-ounce package cream cheese, softened1/2 cup packed brown sugar1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder2 tablespoons milk1/2 teaspoon vanilla1 cup whipping cream3 cups fresh whole strawberries, stems and caps removed2 squares (2 ounces)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 28, 2005
Chefs are different from you and me. Their knives are sharper. They can bone a chicken leg in a flash. And they have caul fat. Caul fat is a lacy membrane that comes from pig stomachs. You won't find it in the grocery store. It comes in bulk, in 15-pound batches that sell for about $25, according to Erik Oosterwijk of Fells Point Wholesale Meats, who supplies the product to a few area restaurants. When Timothy Dean stuffs a chicken leg, he wraps it in caul fat. That is what he learned to do when he was in France, picking up the cooking techniques of his mentor, Jean-Louis Palladin, a renowned Washington chef who died in 2001 at the age of 55. Dean pulled out the caul fat during one of the cooking classes he conducts on Saturday mornings at his Eastern Avenue restaurant, Timothy Dean Bistro.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | July 24, 1991
Right now mango supplies are excellent and prices vary.You can find mangoes as cheap as 69 cents with supermarket specials or as expensive as $1.89 in Asian specialty stores. Typically, expect to pay about $1.39 per mango.Mangoes are versatile. They can be used in almost any recipe in which you would normally use peaches. For a free booklet of mango recipes and tips, write: Chiquita Tropical Products North America, Diversified Marketing, 250 E. Fifth St., Suite 1200, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | November 7, 1991
Mo's Fishermans' Wharf Restaurant at the Inner Harbor boasts of having one of the area's largest seafood menus. While that would be difficult to prove, it is certainly one of the biggest I have seen.The menu lists more than 20 fish, not including shellfish. They can be had broiled, fried, poached, stuffed, Cajun-style or with marinara, bearnaise or hollandaise sauce. Lobster? The menu lists five dishes. Surf and turf? Three, not including the night's "special" cuts topped with shellfish and bearnaise.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
Cerando's Kitchen and Market was built on the theory that people crave restaurant-quality meals in the comfort of their homes. So it sells the likes of beef tenderloin, steamed asparagus and chocolate black velvet cake to go. Now, almost five months after it opened in Ellicott City, Cerando's is offering something extra to customers: tables and chairs. The business, in Golden Triangle shopping center at U.S. 29, U.S. 40 and Ridge Road, is still dishing out take-home meals and running a catering service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | February 13, 2000
It was enough to make any chocoholic go on a bender. The Center for Poverty Solutions' ninth annual Chocolate Affair had Bohager's Parrot Island crammed chockablock with chocolate goodies -- whipped up by more than 40 local restaurants, caterers and candy makers. About 800 chocolate fiends chowed down on samples from soup (Thai chocolate peanut) to nuts (like a chocolate pecan mousse) -- and everything in between (including chocolate chicken and chocolate martinis). Among those feeding their chocolate habit: Jack Elsby and Debbie Attman, event co-chairs; Dina Klicos, Nan Rosenthal, Caryn Sagal and Sharon Wylie, event committee members; Robert Hess, president and CEO of the Center for Poverty Solutions; Daniel Billig, Center for Poverty Solutions board chair; Pam Malester, Ken DeFontes, Sharon Credit, board members; Doug Carton, C-Mart owner; Karen Bond, Baltimore Educational Scholarship Trust executive director; Alan Goodwich, University of Baltimore law student; Sam Craycraft, owner of Craycraft Marble & Tile; Jim Malamatis, Medtronic account exec; Joe Emrich, McIntosh pre-press technician for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.; and chocolate judges Sasha Cronish, Eddie Applefeld, Rob Kasper, Bruce Laird, Sandie Nagel, Lori Pinson and Max Weiss.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | August 1, 2007
Bette Davidson of Baltimore was looking for a recipe she had some years ago for a chocolate mousse made with tofu. Annie Moore of Easthampton, Mass., sent in a recipe for a quick and easy tofu mousse she found on the Internet. I whipped this delicious dessert up in less than 10 minutes, not including chilling time, and everyone raved about it. It is made with a combination of tofu, bananas and chocolate and has no added sugar or dairy products. Tofu Chocolate-Banana Mousse Makes 4 6-ounce servings 8 ounces semisweet chocolate 1 (13.5-ounce)
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 2, 2006
As she gazed at the basket of plump, deep-red tomatoes on my kitchen counter, a friend remarked, "Tomatoes are just pure goodness at this time of the year!" I knew exactly what she meant. In late summer, tomatoes are "real." They are red all the way through (none of those white anemic interiors so prevalent in the winter), and incredibly juicy. Their flavor is so intense and pure that it seems almost celestial. I had purchased my cache at our local farmers' market and couldn't wait to use them at home.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 28, 2005
Chefs are different from you and me. Their knives are sharper. They can bone a chicken leg in a flash. And they have caul fat. Caul fat is a lacy membrane that comes from pig stomachs. You won't find it in the grocery store. It comes in bulk, in 15-pound batches that sell for about $25, according to Erik Oosterwijk of Fells Point Wholesale Meats, who supplies the product to a few area restaurants. When Timothy Dean stuffs a chicken leg, he wraps it in caul fat. That is what he learned to do when he was in France, picking up the cooking techniques of his mentor, Jean-Louis Palladin, a renowned Washington chef who died in 2001 at the age of 55. Dean pulled out the caul fat during one of the cooking classes he conducts on Saturday mornings at his Eastern Avenue restaurant, Timothy Dean Bistro.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2003
Rebecca Hart of Westminster is seeking "a delicious recipe for chocolate mousse," which she has lost. "I have tried recipes, but none are as good. I would appreciate help." Sheila Konsowski of Glen Burnie responded with a recipe for a rum chocolate mousse that she says her family loves. Recipe requests Judie Quent of Berlin is seeking a recipe for a fudge called Valladies (she thinks that is the way to spell it), which she enjoyed when she went with her parents to Washington, D.C. Quent says, "They always got the fudge from Woodward & Lothrop.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | October 12, 2003
Last week, we had three dinner parties at our house. Never would I have planned so much entertaining in such a short time, but a series of serendipitous events led to this outcome. The first of our suppers was our anniversary celebration. I proposed a small dinner with friends at home. I had forgotten that this was the same week I had invited two recipe testers and their spouses for a Wednesday-night potluck meal to sample dishes for a future article. Then friends from out of town called, asking if they could visit.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
Marie K. Pratt of Middletown, Calif., is seeking a recipe for shrimp mousse. "It was served at a luncheon at the Mondavi Winery in St. Helena, Calif., and was also featured in an article in the Sunset magazine. "I would appreciate your help in finding this recipe," she said. Roberta Gresen-Warren of Bend, Ore., responded with a recipe from The Junior League of San Francisco Cookbook. "This may also be served as a luncheon dish ... or as a first course in individual molds." Shrimp Mousse Serves 12 1 1/2 cups small shrimp 1/2 cup finely chopped celery 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 2 tablespoons white-wine vinegar 1 teaspoon prepared horseradish 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper, plus more, if needed 1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more, if needed 1 envelope unflavored gelatin 1/4 cup cold water 1/2 cup heavy cream 1 cup mayonnaise cucumber slices avocado slices 8 large cooked shrimp Combine small shrimp, celery, lemon juice, vinegar, horseradish, pepper and salt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 19, 2013
Based on its name, you might think MoonShine Tavern is strictly a place that's good for shots and not much else. And while it does deliver on the shots - its moonshine menu is a mile long - with a talented kitchen staff offering sophisticated twists on casual Southern food, Boston Street's newest addition deserves a closer look. During our Thursday-night visit to the Canton spot formerly occupied by The Gin Mill, MoonShine's rustic space - polished a bit, but mostly unchanged since the Gin Mill days - was moderately busy, but with more drinkers than diners.
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | March 3, 1991
Bravo. Bravissimo. Michael Tabrizi cooks beautifully, th rooms of the ex-Soup Kitchen glow gracefully, the waiters wait attentively and intelligently, and the casually dressed, chic clientele look like they love it all. We loved it, twice, two nights in a row.The first night, of course, we didn't know what we were in for, until we passed the open kitchen in the entryway, smelled the glorious smells, and stared in at a refrigerated display case holding a...
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
Cerando's Kitchen and Market was built on the theory that people crave restaurant-quality meals in the comfort of their homes. So it sells the likes of beef tenderloin, steamed asparagus and chocolate black velvet cake to go. Now, almost five months after it opened in Ellicott City, Cerando's is offering something extra to customers: tables and chairs. The business, in Golden Triangle shopping center at U.S. 29, U.S. 40 and Ridge Road, is still dishing out take-home meals and running a catering service.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 16, 2000
Who would have thought that a professional photographer and a cyclist could open a new restaurant every bit as good as any that's arrived on the Baltimore scene lately? The photographer is Deborah Mazzolini, and we have her artistic sensibilities to thank for Bicycle's stylish minimalist rooms, painted in citrusy colors of orange, lemon and lime. The cyclist is London-born chef Barry Rumsey, who runs the kitchen and whose hobby inspired the bistro's name. Bicycle is a chic little storefront in a block of south Baltimore that hasn't quite gotten gentrified yet. Its lime-green exterior beckons you in from down the street.
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