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Mousetrap

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | January 9, 2013
By now, 60 long years after Agatha Christie's “The Mousetrap” opened in London, the whodunit is more of a fixture than a stage show. It apparently cannot ever be stopped on that side of The Pond, where it has surpassed the 25,000th performance mark and still holds firmly onto the record as the world's longest-running play. On our shores, the work never became such an institution, but it still continues to attract attention now and then, particularly from community theater groups.
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EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | January 10, 2013
Agatha Christie's "The Mousetrap" opened in London in 1952 and continues to run there. The world's longest running play also remains popular with community theaters around the globe. As the Vagabond Players production demonstrates, this murder mystery remains entertaining. Considered from a sternly logical standpoint, Christie's play suffers from stereotypical characters, a formulaic story and preposterous plot twists. Sternly logical people should avoid this play and the rest of us should avoid them by going to see it. Christie's simple formula involves placing a group of quirky guests in an isolated country inn, stranding them there when heavy snow closes local roads, making them nervous upon learning about a recent unsolved murder, bringing in a policeman to investigate, and consequently having the guests and the audience alike realize that everybody at the inn seems mighty suspicious.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 8, 1998
The Spotlighters Theatre launches the new year with an old chestnut -- Agatha Christie's "The Mousetrap," opening tomorrow. This classic whodunit has been running on London's West End for more than 40 years. But since audiences must swear at the end never to reveal the solution, if you haven't seen it, you'll never know.An ideal winter mystery, "The Mousetrap" is set in motion when a snowstorm strands a group of strangers in a boarding house where a murder takes place. Bob Russell directs the Spotlighters cast, headed by Joe Goodrick as the detective and Greg Parente and Kara Jackson as the newly married couple who run the boarding house and suddenly find themselves suspected of murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | January 9, 2013
By now, 60 long years after Agatha Christie's “The Mousetrap” opened in London, the whodunit is more of a fixture than a stage show. It apparently cannot ever be stopped on that side of The Pond, where it has surpassed the 25,000th performance mark and still holds firmly onto the record as the world's longest-running play. On our shores, the work never became such an institution, but it still continues to attract attention now and then, particularly from community theater groups.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | January 8, 1994
Does your dog slip onto the sofa when you're not watching?Does your cat think nothing's more amusing than pulling the toilet paper off the roll and dragging it through the house?The cure may be a mousetrap.You read that right -- a mousetrap. Those little spring-loaded monsters can actually work wonders on curing some pet problems -- without hurting your pet. The small unbaited kind are the ones to use, and they cost about 50 cents.Here's how they work: When a mousetrap is triggered by motion, it goes off with a loud snap and a leap into the air. The noise and the motion are startling and unpleasant to a pet, who will associate the unpleasantness with the situation and avoid similar setups in the future.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
The mousetrap is an effective -- if crude -- device used to solve vermin problems.Yesterday, it became the solution to an engineering problem as students from five middle schools and a junior high competed in the first Mousetrap Car Tournament at Severn River Junior High School in Arnold.Contestants used cars built from mouse traps to try to push as many as possible of the nine pingpong balls lined up in the middle of a 138-inch-long cafeteria table to the opponent's side."I thought it was just to catch mice," said Daniel Young, 13, an eighth-grader at Severn River.
NEWS
By Jessica Fitzgerald and Jessica Fitzgerald,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2000
Theatre on the Hill performer D. Scott Richards remembered his starving-actor days during and after college as he heated up a rice dish in a microwave oven. "There was a point where I was just thinking, `What do I want for dinner tonight -- the blue Ramen or the brown Ramen?' " said Richards, a recent graduate of Catholic University in Washington. Now Richards eats when he can, usually between rehearsals for Theatre on the Hill, an 18-year-old company of actors that brings summer productions to Alumni Hall at Western Maryland College in Westminster.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
Sixty years ago, an extraordinary reign began in England, one that would provide the nation with a comforting measure of stability and continuity during some of the most tumultuous decades of the 20th century and right on into the far-from-placid 21st. The Diamond Jubilee attracted notice all around the globe, especially since it was a milestone few would have predicted back in 1952, when the curtain first rose on Agatha Christie's theatrical murder mystery "The Mousetrap" in London's West End. Even Christie figured the play would last no more than eight months.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN REPORTER | December 10, 2007
A business deal between two well-known adult entertainment entrepreneurs could bring a sprawling new club to Baltimore's Block, according to documents filed with the city's Zoning Appeals Board, which is set to review the proposal tomorrow. Peter Ireland, the owner of Norma Jeans, and Jack Gresser, a longtime Block landlord and businessman, have submitted paperwork with the city to expand Norma Jeans to two neighboring bars, the Glass Slipper and Mousetrap. Gresser owns the building where the bars are located, according to state records, and he wants the Glass Slipper and Mousetrap out by September 2008.
NEWS
October 16, 2002
The student: Collin Corbliss, 14 School: Mount Hebron High Special achievement: Collin won two Math, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) awards from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. Winners were drawn from middle-schoolers who participated in the MESA after-school program. He won awards for his contribution at his former school (Mount View Middle) and among all Howard participants. How he describes the after-school program: The pupils were given a series of projects to do. "MESA was learning about engineering and math and science, and putting it all together for projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
By now, 60 long years after Agatha Christie's “The Mousetrap” opened in London, the whodunit is more of a fixture than a stage show. It apparently cannot ever be stopped on that side of The Pond, where it has surpassed the 25,000th performance mark and still holds firmly onto the record as the world's longest-running play. On our shores, the work never became such an institution, but it still continues to attract attention now and then, particularly from community theater groups.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
Sixty years ago, an extraordinary reign began in England, one that would provide the nation with a comforting measure of stability and continuity during some of the most tumultuous decades of the 20th century and right on into the far-from-placid 21st. The Diamond Jubilee attracted notice all around the globe, especially since it was a milestone few would have predicted back in 1952, when the curtain first rose on Agatha Christie's theatrical murder mystery "The Mousetrap" in London's West End. Even Christie figured the play would last no more than eight months.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Extracting hydrogen and oxygen from water and burning the gas in your vehicle engine to boost gas mileage and cut emissions? Crazy, many engineers and other experts say. But four Howard County highway workers say they've made devices to do just that and successfully used them on their own vehicles, and now they have the OK to test them on a couple of county vehicles. "If that's what it takes to get a net savings, why not?" County Executive Ken Ulman reasoned after visiting the county's Cooksville vehicle maintenance shop to see the devices and talk to the men who built them.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN REPORTER | December 10, 2007
A business deal between two well-known adult entertainment entrepreneurs could bring a sprawling new club to Baltimore's Block, according to documents filed with the city's Zoning Appeals Board, which is set to review the proposal tomorrow. Peter Ireland, the owner of Norma Jeans, and Jack Gresser, a longtime Block landlord and businessman, have submitted paperwork with the city to expand Norma Jeans to two neighboring bars, the Glass Slipper and Mousetrap. Gresser owns the building where the bars are located, according to state records, and he wants the Glass Slipper and Mousetrap out by September 2008.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,Special to The Sun | October 15, 2006
Gayle Danley roams the fourth-grade classroom at Arnold Elementary School, calling the boys handsome and the girls gorgeous. She tells them to cross out the first two lines of the poems they have written, and cut right to what she calls the "juice." An award-winning slam poet from Baltimore, Danley was at the school for a six-day "get slammin'" residency, which began Oct. 9 with a presentation of her own work, followed by a week of lessons with fourth-graders. Tomorrow, students are invited to share their poems with visiting friends and family.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2004
In the first days of her last year of high school, 16-year-old Brittany Decker hugged her teachers - and mouthed off to them. Sometimes scowling and sullen, the girl who already had been kicked out of three Carroll County high schools swept notebooks from her desk to the floor and punched lockers in frustration. Piercings hugged the arch of her eyebrow and flashed from her nose and tongue. Nine months later, Brittany rolls her eyes in disgust when friends act up. She earned an A and B in her first community college classes this semester and plans to apply next year to four-year, Christian colleges.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1996
A dancer and a barmaid who worked at a club on The Block are hoping that a jury will award them several million dollars in damages stemming from a highly publicized but bungled state police raid at a string of downtown Baltimore strip parlors in 1994.The women, dancer Laura Beth Wolff and barmaid Joanne Dunay, say that they were placed under false arrest, assaulted, battered and detained against their will by state troopers Jan. 14, 1994. Wolff says that the stress caused her to miscarry three days after the raid.
NEWS
July 7, 2000
Murder mystery `The Mousetrap' opens at WMC Agatha Christie's murder mystery "The Mousetrap" opens today at Theatre on the Hill at Western Maryland College. In this story, an assortment of off beat characters find themselves stranded in a remote rooming house during a blizzard. When a guest is murdered, everyone becomes a suspect - a single woman, a newly married couple, an architect, a retired Army major, a jurist and a man who claims his car overturned in a drift. Theatre on the Hill's production is directed by Elizabeth van den Berg and features Erika Roskowinski, Susan Thornton, Sam Huffer, Julie Herber, David Covington, Robert Brown, D. Scott Richards and John Raterman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | May 29, 2003
'Art' opens with gala at Totem Pole The Totem Pole Playhouse in Fayetteville, Pa., opens its summer season Saturday at 6 p.m. with a benefit gala that will include dinner, a reception and the premiere performance of Wil Love and Carl Schurr in Yasmiza Reza's comedy, Art. The Tony Award-winning show sets three friends against each other after one buys a white-on-white painting. And as the ensuing arguments become less about the art and more about each of their foibles, the friends test the bounds of their relationships.
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