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NEWS
February 23, 2011
I say leave our mountains alone ( "Controversy over 'Negro Mountain' reveals urban-rural divide," Feb. 20)! A simple solution could be to add an explanation of the history of the name. It is really silly to change the names of Polish and Big Savage mountains also. In this time of Maryland's money problems, people without jobs, homeless folks, hungry children, firemen, policemen and teachers losing their jobs, it seems that using much needed money on this is a terrible waste. Joan Lease, Cumberland
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
- In the heart of this town on the old U.S. National Road in Western Maryland, a woman leans on the front desk of an 1890s-era hotel, her face a study in mixed emotions. Tina Storey loves her work as office manager of Failinger's Hotel Gunter, the grande dame of lodging in Frostburg with its polished oak staircase, Victorian settees and zillions of artifacts and displays that evoke the history of the so-called "Mountain Side of Maryland. " But she's still grieving the woman who revived the place.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 21, 1997
Sergei Bodrov has said that he wants his "Prisoner of the Mountains," which opens today at the Charles, to be a universal story, not a Chechen story. It is universal, too, except possibly in a way that Bodrov never realized: It's universal in its evocation of the power of the star to illuminate material to an extraordinary degree.This is particularly interesting here because the star is pure: He's got his charisma, and that's it. No covers of Premiere, no Cowan & Rogers flacking for him, nobody flogging phoners with the taco-circuit dailies.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 14, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - On a typical Saturday night after a game, Maryland coach Randy Edsall will sit in his home office and break down the film, going through and analyzing each play while also grading the performance of each player. And whether it was from home or from his office inside Gossett Team House, Edsall spent Saturday night evaluating the film of the Terps ' loss to West Virginia on Saturday afternoon. What he saw? A lot of mistakes and missed opportunities that led to Maryland falling behind, 28-6, early and eventually losing, 40-37.
NEWS
August 30, 1993
The eternal summer dilemma -- the mountains or the shore -- occurs for presidents as well as lesser mortals. Bill Clinton settled it in what is becoming his trademark way. He went to both. In the gusher of criticism being leveled at him for spending last week at that very symbol of Eastern Establishment privilege and leisure, Martha's Vineyard, it is being overlooked that he began his vacation the week before in modest digs at Beaver Lake on the Ozarks Plateau in his home state."Modest" is a relative term.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 13, 2013
With Congress in the doldrums of summer recess, our town has inevitably sunk to the game of making political mountains out of molehills. The latest example is disclosure that the campaign manager of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell confided to a political associate, last January no less, that he was "sort of holding my nose for two years" working for Mr. McConnell. He was doing so, he explained, in hope of it being "a big benefit" for a previous employer, Sen. Rand Paul, also of Kentucky, who is said to have 2016 presidential aspirations.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | August 6, 1991
The pitcher's mother was on the phone. "There's this sports bar with a satellite dish here," Ellie Mussina was saying yesterday, "and the man who owns it went to school with my husband, and he opened up early Sunday so we could see the game. There were, oh, maybe a hundred people there. Just about anyone who'd had anything to do with Mike."A hundred people crammed into a sports bar in a little town in the middle of Pennsylvania, near Williamsport, in Joe Paterno country, watching an epochal event in their lives: one of their own blood pitching in the major leagues for the first time, for the Orioles, against the White Sox. And the pitcher's mother sidled over to one of his high school coaches.
SPORTS
By Phil Hersh and Phil Hersh,Chicago Tribune | July 18, 1991
On his only day off during the 23 days of the Tour de France, Greg LeMond took a hard two-hour bicycle ride in the foothills of the Pyrenees Mountains."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | October 5, 2003
CRAWFORD NOTCH, N.H. - At one end of the building, a mass of rambunctious sixth-graders is learning about geology. At the other, a group from Elderhostel, which runs programs for people 55 and over, readies for its first overnight backpacking trip into the White Mountains. And in between, a hand-lettered sign on the otherwise-bare bulletin board issues this disclaimer: "When it came down to the last minute, we could either make the beds or finish the signs ... " All 122 beds at the Appalachian Mountain Club's new Highland Center are in proper order, I'm pleased to say. The AMC is known for maintaining the hut system in the mountains and for its hiker-friendly Joe Dodge Lodge at the base of 6,288-foot Mount Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and By Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | April 4, 1999
"East of the Mountains," by David Guterson. Harcourt Brace. 288 pages. $25.One of the great lines in contemporary literature graces the final page of the first-novel phenomenon, "Snow Falling on Cedars." "(Ishmael) understood this, too": David Guterson wrote at the close of his mystery, "that accident ruled every corner of the universe except the chambers of the human heart."It was Guterson's achievement, with "Snow," to explore matters of law and landscape, passion and history, within a whodunit framework that kept its readers hungrily turning its pages.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 13, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - The Maryland football team had plenty of self-inflicted wounds in Saturday's 40-37 loss to West Virginia. The Terps also did not get much help from the officials, most notably during the game's final minutes. First, officials marked Maryland quarterback C.J. Brown a yard short of a first down after a run on which the quarterback appeared to cross the first-down marker at the 37-yard line. Instead, officials marked the ball at the 36. Maryland fullback Kenny Goins (Gilman)
SPORTS
September 11, 2014
Back for a second season, we'll be previewing each of Maryland's football games by conducting a Q&A with a reporter who covers the Terps' next opponent. This week, we traded emails with Mike Casazza , who covers West Virginia football for the Charleston Daily Mail. Be sure to check out  more of his WVU coverage here  before the Terps and Mountaineers kick off Saturday at noon in College Park.   Tracking the Terps: Heading into the season it didn't seem like this West Virginia team was going to be a powerhouse.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Mountain biking has had a big influence on Nick Griesser, and his passion motivates him to make others aware of the sport. The Glenelg resident has been biking since he was 10 years old and says he intends to continue mountain biking and "dirt jumping" for the rest of his life. "I think people don't understand how big of an impact mountain biking can have on a community," he said. "If someone like me wasn't interested in team sports and likes to be on their own - it's nice to have.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
“You can get your hair wet, just stay in the shallow end, please,” said Dave Johnston to his daughter earlier this week from his Boulder, Colo., home. The banjoist and singer of the bluegrass act Yonder Mountain String Band was on dad duty, “trying to squeeze in some pool days before summer is gone.” Johnston, 40, knows tour season - which includes a headlining gig at Rams Head Live on Friday - is approaching. But this is nothing new for him or his bandmates, Adam Aijala (guitar, vocals)
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
For as long as anyone can remember, wild orchids have rewarded sharp-eyed hikers in Maryland's Catoctin Mountains with pink, yellow and white blooms peeping from the forest floor. But these "secret beauties," as one researcher dubbed them, are vanishing at an alarming rate, likely devoured by a horde of deer feeding on every leaf and shoot they can reach, according to a new study. "Deer are like lawnmowers when they get going in a forest," said J. Mel Poole, the superintendent of Catoctin Mountain Park in Thurmont.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 9, 2014
Wow. Does Maureen Dowd have an amazing job, or what? Not only does the New York Times columnist occupy some of the most exclusive real estate in journalism, she got her editors to pay her way to Denver to score some dope and get high. She sold the junket as a reporting trip. She'd been writing about Colorado's legalization of marijuana and wanted to see how the rollout was going. Makes sense. You don't cover the Super Bowl from your family room TV. But you also don't suit up. And when the rookie doper - called a "noob" in the business - ate her way through an entire marijuana candy bar instead of taking just a bite, she had a really, really bad trip.
TRAVEL
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | November 25, 2007
TEPOZTLAN, Mexico -- Unless you have Aztecs in your family tree, you might find this city's name hard to pronounce. But so much else about the city is easy, or irresistible. The Aztec echoes, the steam baths, the ice cream, the pyramid, even the corn smut. Tepoztlan -- pronounced teh-pose-LAWN -- is a smallish city that sits in a lush valley rimmed by mountains that appear to have been smuggled out of a Chinese landscape painting. At its center, a 16th-century convent and church rise above a marketplace full of residents making tortillas, nibbling on fried grasshoppers and licking locally concocted sherbets.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
PINEDALE, Wyo. -- The last time anyone saw David Crouch, he was striding across a harsh gray landscape of boulder and crag, well beyond the green comfort of the timberline and miles ** beyond the reach of his friends.A few backpackers passed in the opposite direction, offering greetings even as they wondered at this unlikely sight so close to sundown -- a young man heading up a dead-end trail without pack or parka, carrying nothing but a fishing rod.They said hello. He said nothing. And no one has seen him since.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Here is the opening installment of a series that checks in with the seven Division I programs in the state to give a glimpse into the past and the future. Teams are scheduled to appear according to the chronological order in which their seasons ended. Monday begins with a visit with Mount St. Mary's. REVIEW The good: The Mountaineers (1-15 overall and 1-5 in the Northeast Conference) avoided the indignity of the program's first winless campaign with a 9-5 victory over league rival Wagner on April 19. The positive result didn't prevent the team from finishing the season with a loss to Sacred Heart, but coach Tom Gravante appreciated the resolve the players showed.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Mount St. Mary's ranked 67th out of 67 Division I programs in offense and points per game and 66th in assists per game and scoring margin. But the number that resonated most with coach Tom Gravante was the team's 1-15 record in 2014. “This was one of my toughest seasons,” said Gravante, whose previous worst mark in 20 years as a head coach was a 2-12 record in 2008. “I think I posted two or three wins once before. But to go 1-15, this is a tough year, a real tough year. You don't want to expect something like this or anticipate something like this, but under the circumstances of graduating 22 young men last year and not having a lot of experience coming back, we were hopeful and we battled, but it became what it was.” A 9-5 victory over Northeast Conference foe Wagner on April 19 helped the Mountaineers of joining first-year program Monmouth as the only winless teams in Division I. Gravante acknowledged that a 14-game losing streak to open the season began to weigh on the players.
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