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By Harry Shattuck and Harry Shattuck,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | September 8, 1996
One after another, they gather near the Stone County courthouse square in Mountain View, Ark.An elderly woman dressed in denim. A man whose weathered face is all but hidden beneath a wide-brimmed cowboy hat. A young boy in shorts and T-shirt. Dozens more.They come from their churches and homes on this early Sunday afternoon, bringing guitars and fiddles and mandolins and banjos and a deep respect for song and tradition.They sit in a circle surrounded by family and friends. They begin to play.
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BUSINESS
By Jessica Guynn and Michelle Quinn and Jessica Guynn and Michelle Quinn,Los Angeles Times | October 13, 2007
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- Bracing for an invasion of Google Inc. employees in February after the Internet search giant bought up its office complex, startup Beyond.com erected a makeshift sign: "I for one welcome our Google overlords." The one-liner, lifted from an episode of The Simpsons, captured the ambivalence felt by Mountain View inhabitants over how rapidly Google is taking over their Silicon Valley community of 73,000. The same company that blankets the city with free wireless Internet access and finances Mountain View's high-tech bookmobile also clogs the streets with traffic and bothers residents by flying corporate jets overhead.
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BUSINESS
By Dow Jones News Service | May 13, 1992
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- Scios Inc. and Baltimore-based Nova Pharmaceutical Corp. said they have agreed to merge.In a news release today, the companies said holders of Nova Pharmaceutical common stock will exchange each of their shares for 0.39 share of Scios.The combined company will be called Scios-Nova Inc., with headquarters in Mountain View. It will maintain a research facility in Baltimore.The companies put the transaction value at $180 million.
TRAVEL
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,[Sun reporter] | November 26, 2006
THINK FARMHOUSE CHIC. Farm stands beside boutiques with New York's finest designer brands. Pricey res-taurants down the street from lawns with rusting cars. Mountains looming over streams in towns with no streetlights. Local residents so against cell phone towers that your mobile just might not work there. Get over it. This is the Catskills, that famed resort region between New York City and the Adirondack Mountains, a place with just enough cachet to have trendy shops and fine dining but enough edge and quirkiness to make you feel like you're in a real place with real people and this is your own little secret.
NEWS
November 19, 2004
COLONEL BENSON, U.S. Army Ret., died peacefully at St. Joseph's Hospital early November 15, 2004. Born February 7, 1939 in Baltimore, MD. He attended Loyola High School (Blakefield), and Loyola College, graduating in 1961, as a member of Alpha Sigma Nu, a Jesuit Honorary Society and "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities 1961". He married Bernadette (Johnston) Benson, June 9, 1961, and they raised Frederick Michael and Colleen Ann Benson-Shroy in Lakewood. In lieu of flowers, Memorial Gifts to: St. Labre Indian School, Ashland, MT 59004 in his name.
BUSINESS
By Jessica Guynn and Michelle Quinn and Jessica Guynn and Michelle Quinn,Los Angeles Times | October 13, 2007
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- Bracing for an invasion of Google Inc. employees in February after the Internet search giant bought up its office complex, startup Beyond.com erected a makeshift sign: "I for one welcome our Google overlords." The one-liner, lifted from an episode of The Simpsons, captured the ambivalence felt by Mountain View inhabitants over how rapidly Google is taking over their Silicon Valley community of 73,000. The same company that blankets the city with free wireless Internet access and finances Mountain View's high-tech bookmobile also clogs the streets with traffic and bothers residents by flying corporate jets overhead.
NEWS
June 30, 2002
John Miklas Jr., a civil engineer who devoted his life to youth ministry, died of heart failure Wednesday at a retirement community in Honey Brook, Pa., where he had moved from his home in Kingsville. He was 90. The son of an itinerant railroad worker, he was born in Chicago and moved often as a child until the 1920s, when the family settled in Baltimore. He graduated from Polytechnic Institute and took a job in 1943 as a civil engineer for the Army at Aberdeen Proving Ground. He worked there until his retirement in 1973.
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | March 29, 1995
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- In 1 hour, 17 minutes and 9 seconds yesterday afternoon, John Zelezny did 1,006 chin-ups and 1,006 push-ups in the breezy multipurpose room at Mountain View Elementary School.Under the watchful eyes of four counters and hundreds of cheering students, Dr. Zelezny, a journalism professor at California State University, Fresno, broke fitness guru Jack LaLanne's 35-year-old world record of 1,000 of both exercises in 1 hour, 22 minutes.As Dr. Zelezny reached 990 of each, all of the adults and many of the more than 300 students in the school's multipurpose room jumped to their feet to count out the final repetitions.
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | February 13, 1992
EVERY metropolitan area has at least one but probably several -- totally commercialized radial streets with endless strips of car lots, fast-food restaurants, muffler shops, gas stations. Baltimore has its share: York Road, Ritchie Highway, Harford Road, Belair Road, Liberty Road. Their common characteristic is ugliness -- miles and miles demonstrating what H.L. Mencken called America's "lust to make the world intolerable."Is it possible to have such streets, with their vigorous roadside competition and their need to attract the motorist's eye, and high aesthetic standards as well?
FEATURES
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,Los Angeles Times | May 17, 1995
"Here's a brand-new song . . . one we just wrote last Thursday," singer Michael Stipe said Monday during the opening show in R.E.M.'s first U.S. tour in more than five years.For about 30 seconds, most of the 20,000 fans at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, Calif., believed him. It wasn't until you got used to the aggressive new textures and started focusing on the words that you realized R.E.M. was playing its 1991 hit "Losing My Religion."The moment was typical of the adventurous, good-natured spirit of a band that shows no evidence of resting on its laurels.
NEWS
November 19, 2004
COLONEL BENSON, U.S. Army Ret., died peacefully at St. Joseph's Hospital early November 15, 2004. Born February 7, 1939 in Baltimore, MD. He attended Loyola High School (Blakefield), and Loyola College, graduating in 1961, as a member of Alpha Sigma Nu, a Jesuit Honorary Society and "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities 1961". He married Bernadette (Johnston) Benson, June 9, 1961, and they raised Frederick Michael and Colleen Ann Benson-Shroy in Lakewood. In lieu of flowers, Memorial Gifts to: St. Labre Indian School, Ashland, MT 59004 in his name.
NEWS
June 30, 2002
John Miklas Jr., a civil engineer who devoted his life to youth ministry, died of heart failure Wednesday at a retirement community in Honey Brook, Pa., where he had moved from his home in Kingsville. He was 90. The son of an itinerant railroad worker, he was born in Chicago and moved often as a child until the 1920s, when the family settled in Baltimore. He graduated from Polytechnic Institute and took a job in 1943 as a civil engineer for the Army at Aberdeen Proving Ground. He worked there until his retirement in 1973.
FEATURES
By Thomas R. Fletcher and Thomas R. Fletcher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 1998
The breeze chills the face. Spring arrives just a little later here in the mountains. There is a briskness to the air, but the sun's warmth is soothing. As far as the eye can see, mountain ridge is stacked against mountain ridge. It is not in vain that Webster County in West Virginia is called "The Mountain Park." Taking in the view from atop Elk Mountain, one may be inclined to believe it is a park for mountains. There are no signs of civilization from this vantage point. Far below, on the valley floor is the famed Elk River.
FEATURES
By Harry Shattuck and Harry Shattuck,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | September 8, 1996
One after another, they gather near the Stone County courthouse square in Mountain View, Ark.An elderly woman dressed in denim. A man whose weathered face is all but hidden beneath a wide-brimmed cowboy hat. A young boy in shorts and T-shirt. Dozens more.They come from their churches and homes on this early Sunday afternoon, bringing guitars and fiddles and mandolins and banjos and a deep respect for song and tradition.They sit in a circle surrounded by family and friends. They begin to play.
FEATURES
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,Los Angeles Times | May 17, 1995
"Here's a brand-new song . . . one we just wrote last Thursday," singer Michael Stipe said Monday during the opening show in R.E.M.'s first U.S. tour in more than five years.For about 30 seconds, most of the 20,000 fans at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, Calif., believed him. It wasn't until you got used to the aggressive new textures and started focusing on the words that you realized R.E.M. was playing its 1991 hit "Losing My Religion."The moment was typical of the adventurous, good-natured spirit of a band that shows no evidence of resting on its laurels.
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | March 29, 1995
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- In 1 hour, 17 minutes and 9 seconds yesterday afternoon, John Zelezny did 1,006 chin-ups and 1,006 push-ups in the breezy multipurpose room at Mountain View Elementary School.Under the watchful eyes of four counters and hundreds of cheering students, Dr. Zelezny, a journalism professor at California State University, Fresno, broke fitness guru Jack LaLanne's 35-year-old world record of 1,000 of both exercises in 1 hour, 22 minutes.As Dr. Zelezny reached 990 of each, all of the adults and many of the more than 300 students in the school's multipurpose room jumped to their feet to count out the final repetitions.
TRAVEL
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,[Sun reporter] | November 26, 2006
THINK FARMHOUSE CHIC. Farm stands beside boutiques with New York's finest designer brands. Pricey res-taurants down the street from lawns with rusting cars. Mountains looming over streams in towns with no streetlights. Local residents so against cell phone towers that your mobile just might not work there. Get over it. This is the Catskills, that famed resort region between New York City and the Adirondack Mountains, a place with just enough cachet to have trendy shops and fine dining but enough edge and quirkiness to make you feel like you're in a real place with real people and this is your own little secret.
FEATURES
By Thomas R. Fletcher and Thomas R. Fletcher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 1998
The breeze chills the face. Spring arrives just a little later here in the mountains. There is a briskness to the air, but the sun's warmth is soothing. As far as the eye can see, mountain ridge is stacked against mountain ridge. It is not in vain that Webster County in West Virginia is called "The Mountain Park." Taking in the view from atop Elk Mountain, one may be inclined to believe it is a park for mountains. There are no signs of civilization from this vantage point. Far below, on the valley floor is the famed Elk River.
BUSINESS
By Dow Jones News Service | May 13, 1992
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- Scios Inc. and Baltimore-based Nova Pharmaceutical Corp. said they have agreed to merge.In a news release today, the companies said holders of Nova Pharmaceutical common stock will exchange each of their shares for 0.39 share of Scios.The combined company will be called Scios-Nova Inc., with headquarters in Mountain View. It will maintain a research facility in Baltimore.The companies put the transaction value at $180 million.
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | February 13, 1992
EVERY metropolitan area has at least one but probably several -- totally commercialized radial streets with endless strips of car lots, fast-food restaurants, muffler shops, gas stations. Baltimore has its share: York Road, Ritchie Highway, Harford Road, Belair Road, Liberty Road. Their common characteristic is ugliness -- miles and miles demonstrating what H.L. Mencken called America's "lust to make the world intolerable."Is it possible to have such streets, with their vigorous roadside competition and their need to attract the motorist's eye, and high aesthetic standards as well?
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