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NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | October 17, 1990
Wild mountain lions haven't roamed Maryland for almost 200 years, but Baltimore County police and state wildlife officials were beating the bushes in a Randallstown field last night in search of one.At least three people claimed they saw a mountain lion in a field in the 3700 block of Burmont Avenue -- a residential area where deer and squirrels might be found, but certainly not lions, tigers or bears.Police sent a helicopter to scan the area, and the state Department of Natural Resources' Forest, Park and Wildlife Service set out a trap.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 14, 2003
WITH THIS column I hereby contribute to either the perpetuation of a suburban myth or the advance of a cool story -- the reappearance of mountain lions in Maryland. It could go either way. Over the past 10 years, in particular, we have had several reports of the return of the Eastern cougar to the woods of northern Baltimore County, but the existence of the animal has never been established, and a state wildlife historian told a Sun reporter last year that we haven't had a cougar confirmation since the end of the 19th century.
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NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | October 19, 1990
Eileen Dragonuk has heard of mountain lions in her western Baltimore County neighborhood before.When she was growing up in the same Burmont Avenue house where she lives today, her grandfather and uncle sometimes sighted big cats while they farmed the fields that are now Randallstown residential subdivisions.The tension then was much the same as it has been since Oct. 7, when her neighbor across the street first reported seeing a mountain lion leaping the brush of a field in back of her house.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2002
John Lutz has spent 37 years looking for ghost cats. Puma concolor is most often called a puma, cougar or mountain lion. But its more supernatural nickname seems fitting considering Lutz's quest: collecting evidence of the cats in the Eastern United States, from which they are believed to have vanished. National and state wildlife officials say that native populations of cougars disappeared from the East because of hunting and development, except for a small number of Florida panthers, a subspecies.
NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | October 19, 1990
Laugh all you want, but Agnes Muhl has no doubts about what she, her husband and her mother saw in the front yard of their Thurmont vacation home eight years ago."It was a cougar," insists the 57-year-old Catonsville woman. "It was sitting there looking at the smoke coming out of our chimney."Mrs. Muhl isn't alone. Over the past 25 years, dozens of Maryland residents have reported cougar encounters, even though wildlife officials insist that mountain lions haven't roamed the state for at least a century.
NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | October 18, 1990
The guys in the service department of Larry's Chevrolet in Randallstown scoffed yesterday at the report of a mountain lion roaming around the overgrown brush behind their building. But they figured they would check it out for themselves -- just in case.Rudy Schmidt, a service adviser at the Liberty Road car dealership, planned to lead the second cougar expedition of the day during his lunch hour."We're going to go back there and see what we find," he announced. "We're going to see if we can find Big Foot, too. He might be back there with the mountain lion."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 14, 2003
WITH THIS column I hereby contribute to either the perpetuation of a suburban myth or the advance of a cool story -- the reappearance of mountain lions in Maryland. It could go either way. Over the past 10 years, in particular, we have had several reports of the return of the Eastern cougar to the woods of northern Baltimore County, but the existence of the animal has never been established, and a state wildlife historian told a Sun reporter last year that we haven't had a cougar confirmation since the end of the 19th century.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | August 29, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Until this month, Chris Purkiss saw beauty rather than menace in the rugged landscape that surrounds her family's home in suburban Glendora.But now, after a 6-foot-long, 140-pound mountain lion snatched a Doberman pinscher from the deck outside her bedroom, Ms. Purkiss looks over her shoulder when she walks to her car on the way to work."Now I'm looking and making sure there is nothing behind me, even though they say they caught the one who did it," she said. "Nothing like this has ever happened before.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2002
John Lutz has spent 37 years looking for ghost cats. Puma concolor is most often called a puma, cougar or mountain lion. But its more supernatural nickname seems fitting considering Lutz's quest: collecting evidence of the cats in the Eastern United States, from which they are believed to have vanished. National and state wildlife officials say that native populations of cougars disappeared from the East because of hunting and development, except for a small number of Florida panthers, a subspecies.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 21, 1990
News item: "Wild mountain lions haven't roamed Maryland for almost 200 years, but Baltimore County police and state wildlife officials were beating the bushes in a Randallstown field last night in search of one."At least three people claimed they saw a mountain lion in a field in the 3700 block of Burmont Avenue -- a residential area where deer and squirrels might be found, but certainly not lions or tigers or bears."The separate bands of the tribe would come together at the fall harvest to take council.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | August 29, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Until this month, Chris Purkiss saw beauty rather than menace in the rugged landscape that surrounds her family's home in suburban Glendora.But now, after a 6-foot-long, 140-pound mountain lion snatched a Doberman pinscher from the deck outside her bedroom, Ms. Purkiss looks over her shoulder when she walks to her car on the way to work."Now I'm looking and making sure there is nothing behind me, even though they say they caught the one who did it," she said. "Nothing like this has ever happened before.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 21, 1990
News item: "Wild mountain lions haven't roamed Maryland for almost 200 years, but Baltimore County police and state wildlife officials were beating the bushes in a Randallstown field last night in search of one."At least three people claimed they saw a mountain lion in a field in the 3700 block of Burmont Avenue -- a residential area where deer and squirrels might be found, but certainly not lions or tigers or bears."The separate bands of the tribe would come together at the fall harvest to take council.
NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | October 19, 1990
Laugh all you want, but Agnes Muhl has no doubts about what she, her husband and her mother saw in the front yard of their Thurmont vacation home eight years ago."It was a cougar," insists the 57-year-old Catonsville woman. "It was sitting there looking at the smoke coming out of our chimney."Mrs. Muhl isn't alone. Over the past 25 years, dozens of Maryland residents have reported cougar encounters, even though wildlife officials insist that mountain lions haven't roamed the state for at least a century.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | October 19, 1990
Eileen Dragonuk has heard of mountain lions in her western Baltimore County neighborhood before.When she was growing up in the same Burmont Avenue house where she lives today, her grandfather and uncle sometimes sighted big cats while they farmed the fields that are now Randallstown residential subdivisions.The tension then was much the same as it has been since Oct. 7, when her neighbor across the street first reported seeing a mountain lion leaping the brush of a field in back of her house.
NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | October 18, 1990
The guys in the service department of Larry's Chevrolet in Randallstown scoffed yesterday at the report of a mountain lion roaming around the overgrown brush behind their building. But they figured they would check it out for themselves -- just in case.Rudy Schmidt, a service adviser at the Liberty Road car dealership, planned to lead the second cougar expedition of the day during his lunch hour."We're going to go back there and see what we find," he announced. "We're going to see if we can find Big Foot, too. He might be back there with the mountain lion."
NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | October 17, 1990
Wild mountain lions haven't roamed Maryland for almost 200 years, but Baltimore County police and state wildlife officials were beating the bushes in a Randallstown field last night in search of one.At least three people claimed they saw a mountain lion in a field in the 3700 block of Burmont Avenue -- a residential area where deer and squirrels might be found, but certainly not lions, tigers or bears.Police sent a helicopter to scan the area, and the state Department of Natural Resources' Forest, Park and Wildlife Service set out a trap.
NEWS
By Christine Hanley and Mike Anton and Christine Hanley and Mike Anton,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 2004
LOS ANGELES - When the chain broke on Mark Reynolds' mountain bike, he found himself in the worst possible place - near a stalking mountain lion in the rugged Orange County, Calif., foothills. Then, authorities said yesterday, Reynolds crouched to fix his bike, a posture that likely spurred the lion to attack. Reynolds, 35, of Foothill Ranch, Calif., was disemboweled by the 110-pound male cougar and dragged from the popular trail in Whiting Ranch Wilderness Park on Thursday. His body went undetected for up to 12 hours.
NEWS
November 23, 1990
New chemical tests devised in Canada are allowing scientists for the first time to identify the kinds of animals that were killed by Indians in Maryland many centuries ago.Tests on 10 ancient arrowheads recovered last month at an archaeological dig near Laurel -- the site of a 1,000- to 5,000-year-old Indian camp -- have revealed the presence of blood from rabbit, turkey and several other species, said R. Christopher Goodwin, a Frederick archaeologist.Such...
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