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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK -- Dolores Hayden can't get over how hot it's been. On her spacious front porch last week, shaded from the afternoon sun, it must have been all of 85 degrees.A century ago, when Baltimore streets sweltered, city dwellers who could afford to boarded trains to escape to this small Garrett County community. From the early 1880s until about 1920, this was one of the mid-Atlantic region's premier summer resorts.Deep Creek Lake has long since supplanted Mountain Lake Park as Western Maryland's vacation destination.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 28, 2011
Douglas F. Pollard, a retired Legg Mason senior vice president who enjoyed flying, died April 16 of heart failure at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The longtime Glyndon resident was 68. Mr. Pollard was born and raised in Hagerstown, where he graduated in 1961 from St. James School. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from the University of Virginia and began his Wall Street career at Kidder Peabody & Co. in New York City, and later Philadelphia. He moved to Baltimore in 1966, and 11 years later was promoted to vice president at Kidder Peabody.
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FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
Despite the lingering piles of snow that remain as a reminder of the 56 inches that blanketed Mountain Lake Park over the winter, daffodils there are starting to poke their heads up through the ground. The cold is releasing its grip on this once-fashionable Garrett County resort, which dates to 1881.Soon shutters will be thrown back and wicker porch furniture returned to broad Victorian porches as its 1,300 residents prepare for another summer in what was once called "America's ideal summer resort."
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 2002
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK - After running a children's summer camp in Garrett County for nearly 20 years and living there year-round, you would think Fred and Nancy Learey would decide to take it easy. But instead the couple decided to renovate and expand a historic cottage not far from the camp. "That was hard work and a lot of responsibility," Fred Learey said about running Camp Minnetoska. "We reached the point where it was time to do something different." The Leareys knew they wanted to stay in the area after selling the camp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 28, 2011
Douglas F. Pollard, a retired Legg Mason senior vice president who enjoyed flying, died April 16 of heart failure at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The longtime Glyndon resident was 68. Mr. Pollard was born and raised in Hagerstown, where he graduated in 1961 from St. James School. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from the University of Virginia and began his Wall Street career at Kidder Peabody & Co. in New York City, and later Philadelphia. He moved to Baltimore in 1966, and 11 years later was promoted to vice president at Kidder Peabody.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 2002
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK - After running a children's summer camp in Garrett County for nearly 20 years and living there year-round, you would think Fred and Nancy Learey would decide to take it easy. But instead the couple decided to renovate and expand a historic cottage not far from the camp. "That was hard work and a lot of responsibility," Fred Learey said about running Camp Minnetoska. "We reached the point where it was time to do something different." The Leareys knew they wanted to stay in the area after selling the camp.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2000
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK -- Fluoride has been a fighting word in Western Maryland for nearly 40 years. But with tooth decay rampant among children in the region, this former railroad resort in Garrett County is preparing to reopen the old debate about whether to put the cavity-fighting chemical in its drinking water. "The time for this has long since come," says Mayor Paul Shockey. The 65-year-old former county roads chief says that a citizen committee is expected Jan. 11 to recommend adding fluoride to the water the town furnishes to about 1,500 families on the outskirts of Oakland.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | August 10, 1997
150 years ago in The SunAug. 10: A Race -- Yesterday morning, a horse attached to a dray ran away from the Belvidere depot, at the head of Calvert Street, to the no small consternation of pedestrians. His course was arrested opposite the amphitheatre, at the corner of Franklin street, just in time to prevent the demolition of a lamp post. Fortunately, no one was injured.Aug. 13: MARRIAGE EXTRAORDINARY -- In Kingston, N.H., Col. William Webster, aged 67, to Miss Martha Winslow, aged 19. By the above union, the bridegroom has married his sister's granddaughter, which makes the bride a wife to her great uncle, sister to her grandfather and grandmother, aunt to her father and mother, and great aunt to her brother and sisters.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Stacy and Cindy Stacy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 1997
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK -- What Prince George's County educators Anne and Don Forrester always wanted when they retired was to settle into "a dream home in a dream community."They've achieved both, retiring in July 1995 to a new 3,000-square-foot-home in Garrett County's Mountain Lake Park."It's a lot like Laurel was 40 years ago," said Mrs. Forrester, who until her move to Maryland's westernmost county had always lived in Laurel. "There's a sense of community and everyone knows everyone."So besides their new home with old-fashioned front and rear porches, the Forresters are clearly smitten with life in the mountaintop town that was a famous turn-of-the-century summer resort.
FEATURES
By CINDY STACY | September 27, 1992
Deep Creek Lake may be Garrett County's foremost resort destination today, but at the turn of the century the honor most certainly was Mountain Lake Park's.Located at "the summit of the Alleganies," Mountain Lake Park early on billed itself as a "summer city protected from grave moral perils; a summer home in the most salubrious of climates; a summer lyceum with able lecturers and a summer resort amid superb scenery."Founded in 1881 by clergymen from Wheeling, W.Va., the resort attracted the Chautauqua movement, a popular summer adult-education program combining recreation, formal and informal classes and discussions at sites around the country.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2000
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK -- Fluoride has been a fighting word in Western Maryland for nearly 40 years. But with tooth decay rampant among children in the region, this former railroad resort in Garrett County is preparing to reopen the old debate about whether to put the cavity-fighting chemical in its drinking water. "The time for this has long since come," says Mayor Paul Shockey. The 65-year-old former county roads chief says that a citizen committee is expected Jan. 11 to recommend adding fluoride to the water the town furnishes to about 1,500 families on the outskirts of Oakland.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK -- Dolores Hayden can't get over how hot it's been. On her spacious front porch last week, shaded from the afternoon sun, it must have been all of 85 degrees.A century ago, when Baltimore streets sweltered, city dwellers who could afford to boarded trains to escape to this small Garrett County community. From the early 1880s until about 1920, this was one of the mid-Atlantic region's premier summer resorts.Deep Creek Lake has long since supplanted Mountain Lake Park as Western Maryland's vacation destination.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
Despite the lingering piles of snow that remain as a reminder of the 56 inches that blanketed Mountain Lake Park over the winter, daffodils there are starting to poke their heads up through the ground. The cold is releasing its grip on this once-fashionable Garrett County resort, which dates to 1881.Soon shutters will be thrown back and wicker porch furniture returned to broad Victorian porches as its 1,300 residents prepare for another summer in what was once called "America's ideal summer resort."
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | August 10, 1997
150 years ago in The SunAug. 10: A Race -- Yesterday morning, a horse attached to a dray ran away from the Belvidere depot, at the head of Calvert Street, to the no small consternation of pedestrians. His course was arrested opposite the amphitheatre, at the corner of Franklin street, just in time to prevent the demolition of a lamp post. Fortunately, no one was injured.Aug. 13: MARRIAGE EXTRAORDINARY -- In Kingston, N.H., Col. William Webster, aged 67, to Miss Martha Winslow, aged 19. By the above union, the bridegroom has married his sister's granddaughter, which makes the bride a wife to her great uncle, sister to her grandfather and grandmother, aunt to her father and mother, and great aunt to her brother and sisters.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Stacy and Cindy Stacy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 1997
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK -- What Prince George's County educators Anne and Don Forrester always wanted when they retired was to settle into "a dream home in a dream community."They've achieved both, retiring in July 1995 to a new 3,000-square-foot-home in Garrett County's Mountain Lake Park."It's a lot like Laurel was 40 years ago," said Mrs. Forrester, who until her move to Maryland's westernmost county had always lived in Laurel. "There's a sense of community and everyone knows everyone."So besides their new home with old-fashioned front and rear porches, the Forresters are clearly smitten with life in the mountaintop town that was a famous turn-of-the-century summer resort.
FEATURES
By CINDY STACY | September 27, 1992
Deep Creek Lake may be Garrett County's foremost resort destination today, but at the turn of the century the honor most certainly was Mountain Lake Park's.Located at "the summit of the Alleganies," Mountain Lake Park early on billed itself as a "summer city protected from grave moral perils; a summer home in the most salubrious of climates; a summer lyceum with able lecturers and a summer resort amid superb scenery."Founded in 1881 by clergymen from Wheeling, W.Va., the resort attracted the Chautauqua movement, a popular summer adult-education program combining recreation, formal and informal classes and discussions at sites around the country.
NEWS
September 22, 1994
McHENRY -- A McHenry man was in serious condition yesterday at Cumberland's Memorial Hospital after a plane crash in Garrett County.Harry Vitez, 42, was a passenger in a plane that took off from the Garrett County Airport in McHenry at 6:08 p.m. Tuesday. It crashed about 10 minutes later, state police said. Two others in the plane, Larry Rosage, 54, of McHenry and Timothy Yommer, 34, of Mountain Lake Park, were treated at Garrett Memorial Hospital and released. A fourth person, Kent Burnside, 49, of Weston, W.Va.
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