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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 18, 2005
Baltimore's Mount Royal train station hasn't served a passenger since 1961, when the B and O Railroad ceased using it as a commuter terminal. But for a brief period this summer, the building's interior looked much the way it did before rail service stopped, with high ceilings above the former baggage area, large windows on the east side and a brick fireplace in the middle of the old waiting room. Now the interior has been partially covered up again as the building's owner, the Maryland Institute College of Art, prepares to reopen it this month as a place to make sculpture and other three-dimensional forms of art. But the architects and builders have left plenty of clues about the building's railroading heritage, from an outside wall that's now part of the main inside corridor to a stone medallion that will be exposed on a gallery floor.
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The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2012
As of 9 a.m., traffic is slow on I-83 southbound near Belfast Road, due to cleanup from an accident involving two vehicles. All lanes have reopened after an earlier accident involving a passenger van and an SUV. Accidents were slowing traffic on southbound York Road at Loveton Circle in Baltimore County and Washington Boulevard at Hammonds Ferry Road in Baltimore. The Hammonds Ferry Road incident involved a pedestrian who was struck.. Emergency roadwork caused all eastbound and westbound lanes to be closed on Route 450 near Rutland Road in Anne Arundel County.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
MOUNT ROYAL Station, the midtown depot-turned-arts center from which thousands of travelers have begun journeys either in space or time, will pass a milestone of its own this weekend.On Sunday the building will turn 100 years old, its massive granite walls and soaring clock tower looking much the way they did when constructed.Last used for train travel in 1961, the station became one of the country's first examples of adaptive reuse several years later, when the Maryland Institute, College of Art converted it to sculpture studios, a library, gallery and lecture hall.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | July 18, 2009
I often find myself walking through the neighborhoods around Penn Station where Artscape is being staged this weekend. After years of not much happening, these blocks now seem to change before my eyes, even if so many of the buildings seem underused or boarded up. It's a curious part of Baltimore that often keeps its secrets to itself. Discovering what goes on here has proved a lot of fun. There are artists' lofts and studios scattered around the Mount Royal-North Avenue area. The talented people here tell me they like the modest rents and are not concerned with modest exteriors.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 8, 2004
The federal government will contribute $1.7 million for projects in Baltimore to extend the Jones Falls Trail from Pennsylvania Station to Woodberry and restore historic Mount Royal Station, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced yesterday. The 2.75-mile Jones Falls Trail extension will link Penn Station and the Woodberry Light Rail stop and provide "a great way to get around Baltimore," Ehrlich said in a written statement. The trail segment, which will cost $1.6 million, will wind through Druid Hill Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
Art of Conversations The works of more than 90 artists will be displayed in Conversations, a group show that opens today at the Johns Hopkins University's Evergreen House. Curated by local painter and Maryland Institute College of Art faculty member Barry Nemett, the exhibit uncovers the ways in which personal exchanges and interactions influence art. The works of Raoul Middleman, Grace Hartigan and William Kentridge, among others, are included in the display, which runs through Jan. 4. A reception will be held at 5:30 p.m. today.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 21, 2008
It all began when a reader who lives on John Street in Bolton Hill wanted to learn the circumstances of the city's 1930s plan to extend Howard Street through his neighborhood via a route that includes the familiar hump-back bridge over the Jones Falls Expressway.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | April 11, 1993
Violist Kim Kashkashian performs at PeabodyViolist Kim Kashkashian is one of the most passionate musicians and one of the few people who has ever been able to give her neglected instrument star status. The Peabody Conservatory alumna will perform Tuesday at 8:15 p.m. in Friedberg Hall with another Peabody alumnus, the talented pianist Charles Abramovic. Their beautiful program will include Brahms' Sonata in E-flat, Britten's "Lachrymae," Falla's "Suite Populaire" and Penderecki's "Cadenza for Solo Viola."
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1996
The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's Mount Royal Station gained centenarian status this month the same way it opened 100 years ago -- without civic fanfare or recognition.The station, which now houses the Maryland Institute, College of Art, opened Sept. 1, 1896, with no ceremony whatever, except for a front-page advertisement in The Sun that proclaimed:"Passengers for Eastern points shall not fail to visit Mount Royal Station on their next trip. The Royal Blue Line trains are fine, fast and frequent."
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 4, 1993
From The Sun July 4-July 10, 1843July 4: The Mysterious Lady has taken rooms at No. 146 Baltimore Street, where with the performing birds and educateddog, entertainment will be found for visitors.July 10: Some malicious person on Saturday night, very much cut and injured the new awning before the cabinet-making establishment of Mr. Edward S. Tarr, North Gay Street. Comment on such a diabolical spirit of mischief is unnecessary.From The Sun July 4-July 10, 1893July 4: From present indications Baltimore's Independence Day crop of burnt fingers and singed eyebrows will be greater than ever before in the city's history.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
While passing a vacant Baltimore Street shop, I considered a March day 35 years ago. I'd slipped away from the old New American's city desk on a quick break and made a sharp, unexplained turn into that space, then occupied by a PanAm Airlines sales office. Although out for nothing more than a sandwich, I found myself spending Easter week in England. A persuasive sales agent named Rita overcame all my natural Baltimore fear of destinations beyond New York and Ocean City. My Baltimore travel reference points had been primitive.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 21, 2008
It all began when a reader who lives on John Street in Bolton Hill wanted to learn the circumstances of the city's 1930s plan to extend Howard Street through his neighborhood via a route that includes the familiar hump-back bridge over the Jones Falls Expressway.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Reporter | August 23, 2007
Users of the Maryland Transit Administration's light rail service between downtown Baltimore and Penn Station will soon be able to travel nonstop. The MTA has announced that starting Sunday, it will eliminate the need for passengers traveling between the station and Camden Yards in downtown to switch trains at the University of Baltimore/Mount Royal Station. Riders northbound from Penn Station, as well as those heading to the station from the northern segment of the line, will still have to transfer at Mount Royal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | May 12, 2007
Several weeks ago, a couple of hundred guests, government and construction officials, alumni and students, gathered under threatening skies to celebrate completion of a two-year, $6.3 million renovation of historic Mount Royal Station, long a centerpiece of the Maryland Institute College of Art and a successful national symbol of adaptive reuse. The building, in Romanesque style with elements of Renaissance Revival, features a red tile roof and a 150-foot-tall clock tower designed by architects E. Francis Baldwin and Josias Pennington.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 18, 2005
Baltimore's Mount Royal train station hasn't served a passenger since 1961, when the B and O Railroad ceased using it as a commuter terminal. But for a brief period this summer, the building's interior looked much the way it did before rail service stopped, with high ceilings above the former baggage area, large windows on the east side and a brick fireplace in the middle of the old waiting room. Now the interior has been partially covered up again as the building's owner, the Maryland Institute College of Art, prepares to reopen it this month as a place to make sculpture and other three-dimensional forms of art. But the architects and builders have left plenty of clues about the building's railroading heritage, from an outside wall that's now part of the main inside corridor to a stone medallion that will be exposed on a gallery floor.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 8, 2004
The federal government will contribute $1.7 million for projects in Baltimore to extend the Jones Falls Trail from Pennsylvania Station to Woodberry and restore historic Mount Royal Station, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced yesterday. The 2.75-mile Jones Falls Trail extension will link Penn Station and the Woodberry Light Rail stop and provide "a great way to get around Baltimore," Ehrlich said in a written statement. The trail segment, which will cost $1.6 million, will wind through Druid Hill Park.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
Artist and poet Amiri Baraka, formerly known as Leroi Jones, will read from his work at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Maryland Institute, College of Art's Mount Royal Station Auditorium.One of the more influential African-American artists of the 20th century, Mr. Baraka has directed several community arts programs, such as the Black Arts Repertory Theatre-School in Harlem, and has written many books of poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction.He will speak as part of the Institute's "Spectrum of Poetic Fire" poetry series organized by faculty member and poet Joe Cardarelli.
NEWS
January 31, 1994
With Baltimore's light rail system finally drawing substantial numbers of patrons, Intrepid Commuter is beginning to hear questions arise.When will they build the extension to Hunt Valley? To Baltimore-Washington International Airport? To Pennsylvania Station?In October, the Federal Transit Administration approved environmental-impact statements for all three extensions, paving the way (if you transit advocates will pardon the expression) for ,, the Mass Transit Administration to build them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
Art of Conversations The works of more than 90 artists will be displayed in Conversations, a group show that opens today at the Johns Hopkins University's Evergreen House. Curated by local painter and Maryland Institute College of Art faculty member Barry Nemett, the exhibit uncovers the ways in which personal exchanges and interactions influence art. The works of Raoul Middleman, Grace Hartigan and William Kentridge, among others, are included in the display, which runs through Jan. 4. A reception will be held at 5:30 p.m. today.
NEWS
By Fred B. Shoken | October 15, 1997
This article is one in an occasional series that examines underused properties in Baltimore, suggesting how they can be redeveloped.PREVIOUS ARTICLES in this series have been abouconverting an empty building or vacant lot into a new use. This one suggests an improvement to an existing city park.My intention is not to alter the overall design or the predominant use of Federal Hill Park, but to suggest how a seldom-used portion of the park can be changed to promote greater activity.Federal Hill has always been an important gathering spot.
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