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By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | July 16, 2007
Less than a week after a devastating fire displaced his 3,000-member flock, Bishop Oscar E. Brown of First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church stood on the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall stage yesterday with a message of hope, thanks and praise. "Today really marks the beginning of a new path for Mount Olive," Brown said, shortly before yesterday's three-hour service began. "The building burned down, but the church is still alive." Officials from the Meyerhoff volunteered the 2,500-capacity venue for Brown's congregation.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | July 29, 2009
The Rev. Carlton Lewis Sr., a former steel worker who served as pastor of Mount Olive Baptist Church in Turners Station since 1991, died in his sleep July 20 at Future Care Canton Harbor nursing home. The longtime Dundalk resident, who had not retired, was 82. "Everyone in Turners Station knows that we've lost a really good man," said the Rev. Joseph Lewis (no relation), pastor of Greater St. John Baptist Church, also in Turners Station. "He loved singing and preaching. He loved the Lord.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | July 29, 2009
The Rev. Carlton Lewis Sr., a former steel worker who served as pastor of Mount Olive Baptist Church in Turners Station since 1991, died in his sleep July 20 at Future Care Canton Harbor nursing home. The longtime Dundalk resident, who had not retired, was 82. "Everyone in Turners Station knows that we've lost a really good man," said the Rev. Joseph Lewis (no relation), pastor of Greater St. John Baptist Church, also in Turners Station. "He loved singing and preaching. He loved the Lord.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 18, 2008
Leo Amster, the former owner of Leo Amster's Formal Wear and a well-known figure who was known as Catonsville's unofficial mayor, died Monday at the Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center & Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 89. Mr. Amster was born in Richmond, Va., and raised in Mount Olive, N.C., where his father owned and operated a small department store. After graduating from Mount Olive High School, he enlisted in the Army and served in counterintelligence during World War II. He moved to Baltimore in 1946, when he and a brother opened a food market at Garrison Boulevard and Liberty Heights Avenue.
NEWS
By LYN BACKE | September 27, 1993
Several years ago, through a variety of lucky circumstances, I was able to take a five-month trip, living out of one suitcase and having a delicious time.Lots of people asked how I could stand being away from home so long. The answer was that it was easy, because I loved all the new things we were seeing, and I didn't particularly like where I was living at the time.I'd have a lot more trouble being away from Annapolis for five months (though I'm open to the challenge, if someone wants to fund me)
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun Reporter | July 19, 2007
The First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church bought a luxurious custom Bentley in 2005, the same year the inner-city church failed to pay a $12,000 water bill that has led to the filing of a foreclosure suit, motor vehicle records show. The congregation that owns the 140-year-old West Baltimore church, destroyed last week by lightning, is fending off multiple foreclosure threats because of the delinquent water bill and an alleged mortgage default on the 9-acre property the church owns in Southwest Baltimore, according to court records.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | November 29, 1993
MOUNT OLIVE, N.C. -- Morgan State was unable to hold a five-point lead in the last six minutes, as Mount Olive rallied behind Angel Henderson's 15 points for a 77-69 women's victory yesterday.Morgan (0-2) came back from a 40-35 halftime deficit to take a 60-55 lead with six minutes left when a power outage halted the game for 10 minutes. With four minutes left, Morgan freshman guard Kaira Warfield, who led all scorers with 17, fouled out. The Trojans retook the lead for good a minute later.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1996
The Episcopalians couldn't quite bring themselves to sway to the music, though they did manage to shout out a few responses to the minister. The Baptists weren't positive the Episcopalian minister had dismissed them, accustomed as they are to a triumphant recessional.St. Thomas' Episcopal, a mostly white Towson church, traded ministers and choirs yesterday with Mount Olive Baptist, a black Towson church, in an experiment in neighborliness that crossed religious and racial lines.Stereotypes were confirmed, but with loving appreciation: "Of course, we're more sedate," Pam Nickerson said, putting it in perfectly Episcopalian terms: "Our worship is intrinsic.
NEWS
September 8, 2000
Leon Epps, 41, machinist at Lockheed Martin Corp. Leon Epps, a Lockheed Martin Corp. machinist, died Saturday of undetermined causes at Franklin Square Hospital. He was 41. Mr. Epps began his career in 1978 with Martin Marietta Corp. A Middle River resident, he was born and reared in Chase and graduated from Sparrows Point High School. In 1985, he married Chavonne Evans, who survives him. Services will be held at 11 a.m. today at Mount Olive Baptist Church, 651 Mount Olive Road in Turners Station.
NEWS
December 7, 1990
Ford Marshall Mann, 70, a retired employee of the Baltimore Sun, died Nov. 28 at Catawba Memorial Hospital in Hickory, N.C., of a heart attack. He had been in declining health for several weeks.Mr. Mann was employed at the newspapers from September 1958 until he retired Dec. 31, 1981. He worked in the ad room and was a Linotype operator.A native of Franklin, N.C., he moved back to North Carolina after his retirement. He was a resident of Newton, N.C.Mr. Mann was a veteran of World War II. He was a member of the Mount Olive Lutheran Church.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | January 21, 2008
If any member of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation at first appeared to be subdued during the joint service with First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church, Senior Rabbi Rex D. Perlmeter offered an explanation. "You lift your hands in prayer, and by tradition we have sat on our hands in worship," Perlmeter said of his Reform congregation's custom of relatively reserved services. But the stillness was short-lived yesterday as both the Baptist and Jewish congregations in Baltimore took to their feet with cheers praising God at the sprawling Park Heights Avenue temple.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | October 22, 2007
In the stark cinderblock room known as the chapel at the state prison in Jessup, Bishop Oscar E. Brown gave 75 inmates a message yesterday that they are not "second-class citizens" and that they will emerge from prison better men. In turn, the inmates gave him a check for $650 to help rebuild his church, First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church. The church's steeple was hit by lightning in July, causing a fire that devastated the building. For years, members of the church have been volunteering at the Maryland Correctional Institution-Jessup to lead inmates in prayer and fellowship.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun Reporter | July 19, 2007
The First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church bought a luxurious custom Bentley in 2005, the same year the inner-city church failed to pay a $12,000 water bill that has led to the filing of a foreclosure suit, motor vehicle records show. The congregation that owns the 140-year-old West Baltimore church, destroyed last week by lightning, is fending off multiple foreclosure threats because of the delinquent water bill and an alleged mortgage default on the 9-acre property the church owns in Southwest Baltimore, according to court records.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | July 16, 2007
Less than a week after a devastating fire displaced his 3,000-member flock, Bishop Oscar E. Brown of First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church stood on the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall stage yesterday with a message of hope, thanks and praise. "Today really marks the beginning of a new path for Mount Olive," Brown said, shortly before yesterday's three-hour service began. "The building burned down, but the church is still alive." Officials from the Meyerhoff volunteered the 2,500-capacity venue for Brown's congregation.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | July 14, 2007
I was rounding the arc on Martin Luther King Boulevard the other evening when the charred and exposed timbers of the First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church came into view. I had been looking for the landmark, but I was astonished when its fractured and wounded silhouette form appeared. Where a roof should have been was sky. Its magnificent and familiar spire was no more.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Brent Jones and Gadi Dechter and Brent Jones,sun reporters | July 14, 2007
Just days before a 140-year-old church in West Baltimore was destroyed by fire, the nonprofit corporation that owns it was twice threatened with foreclosure - on both the historic house of worship and a separate 9-acre plot purchased in 2002. In the aftermath of Tuesday's five-alarm fire, Bishop Oscar E. Brown of First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church has raised the spirits of thousands of followers by announcing that the church's insurance company has committed to pay out $4 million - enough to pay off their debts.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | January 25, 1993
A gym might seem a curious setting for a sermon.But to Gerald Simms, the thumps and grunts of a basketball game at Bates Middle School in Annapolis make a perfect backdrop for God."Jesus went wherever the people were, and that's what we want to do," says Mr. Simms, 27.Mr. Simms' church, Mount Olive African Methodist Episcopal, is one of 20 congregations from Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties that have joined the Washington Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Basketball Ministry.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | January 21, 2008
If any member of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation at first appeared to be subdued during the joint service with First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church, Senior Rabbi Rex D. Perlmeter offered an explanation. "You lift your hands in prayer, and by tradition we have sat on our hands in worship," Perlmeter said of his Reform congregation's custom of relatively reserved services. But the stillness was short-lived yesterday as both the Baptist and Jewish congregations in Baltimore took to their feet with cheers praising God at the sprawling Park Heights Avenue temple.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 11, 2007
Lightning struck the steeple of a 140-year-old West Baltimore church during an unexpectedly violent thunderstorm yesterday, igniting a five-alarm fire that left the sanctuary in ruins. The bolt struck the steeple of the First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church about 3 p.m., officials said. The spire soon toppled onto the adjoining roof, setting fire to the building and devastating its 3,000-member congregation. "The building will be a total loss," said fire Chief William J. Goodwin, as 150 firefighters with 42 pieces of equipment battled the blaze in the 800 block of W. Saratoga St. Elsewhere, the sudden storm toppled trees, started other fires and cut power to tens of thousands of utility customers as it slashed across the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Julie Turkewitz and Gadi Dechter and Julie Turkewitz,SUN REPORTERS | July 11, 2007
As smoke billowed from the burning remains of their 140-year-old West Baltimore church, dozens of parishioners huddled around their bishop, crying, singing - and vowing that lightning would not strike down their congregation as it had their place of worship. "We have just been preaching on faith for the last six or seven months," said Bishop Oscar E. Brown of the First Mount Olive Free Will Baptist Church. "I can only say, that was preparation for this moment. "It's his [God's] church, we're his people and we trust he's going to take care of us."
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