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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1998
The aging debate about whether Dr. Frederick A. Cook reached the top of Mount McKinley has warmed up again, with warring sides calling each other "vicious" and each other's supporting evidence "diversions."The Frederick A. Cook Society this month returned fire against naysayers who in July blasted as a giant hoax the doctor's contention that in 1906 he was the first to ascend Alaska's Mount McKinley.In a small Baltimore-based journal, Dio, critics printed almost 100 pages of detail and declared on the cover, "Dr. Cook-Mt.
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SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | June 13, 2012
Former WWEsuperstar and Fox Newsfinancial analyst John “Bradshaw” Layfield, 45, begins his years-long project today to climb each continent's highest summit in an effort to raise money for underprivileged children at Family Centre in Bermuda. Though Layfield is from Texas, he now calls the island country his home. "I ran into a friend of mine who raised a ton of money for charity climbing the seven summits,” Layfield said in a phone interview Monday. "I wanted to raise money for my at-risk kids that I work with in Bermuda and I thought this was a great way to try and do it. " WWE jumped at the opportunity to partner up with Layfield in his project and decided to help in a big way. "I reached out to [WWE chairman and CEO]
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1998
From Harper's Magazine, May 1907, by Frederick A. Cook:After a long siege, during which we were compelled to acknowledge several disheartening defeats, we have at last conquered the highest mountain of our continent. We were not days or weeks, but months, in desperate positions, fording icy glacial streams, pushing through thick underbrush, crossing life-sapping marshes and tundras, enduring the tortures of mosquitoes, camping on the top of wind-swept peaks, and being drenched from above and below with frigid waters; in snow-storms, on ice, in gloomy canyons and gulches; on ice cornices and precipices, always with torment and death before us.Exciting, no?
TRAVEL
December 20, 2009
My wife and I live in Baltimore County and in August we took a trip to Alaska to celebrate my retirement from Loyola University Maryland. I took this shot of Mount McKinley while we were staying at Kantishna Roadhouse, a Native Alaskan-owned lodge that is deep in the heart of Alaska's majestic Denali National Park and Preserve. We also were able to fly around the mountain in a six-seat, propeller plane. The scenery is awesome. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot."
TRAVEL
September 7, 2008
John McCain's choice for a running mate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, may have been a cold shock to some pundits, but her state has long been a hot tourist destination. Alaska's rustic beauty, from Mount McKinley to the Inside Passage, attracts adventurers, nature lovers, sports enthusiasts and more. The state offers glaciers, fjords, lakes, mountains, parks, Native American culture and wildlife, to name just a few of the tourist draws. Here are five things to do in and around Anchorage: 1 Visit Wasilla : Governor Palin's hometown - and the place where she served as mayor - is about a 45-minute drive from Anchorage.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1998
The caption accompanying a photograph of Alaska's Mount McKinley, published on Page 8A yesterday in The Sun, failed to credit the photographer, Bradford Washburn. He took the picture of the knife-edged Hairy Ridge while flying in 1956 at 11,000 feet altitude with the famed Alaskan bush pilot Don Sheldon.The Sun regrets the error.BOSTON -- A 90-year-old controversy over whether Dr. Frederick A. Cook was the first to ascend Alaska's Mount McKinley is as relentless a phenomenon as the glaciers inching down North America's highest mountain.
TRAVEL
December 20, 2009
My wife and I live in Baltimore County and in August we took a trip to Alaska to celebrate my retirement from Loyola University Maryland. I took this shot of Mount McKinley while we were staying at Kantishna Roadhouse, a Native Alaskan-owned lodge that is deep in the heart of Alaska's majestic Denali National Park and Preserve. We also were able to fly around the mountain in a six-seat, propeller plane. The scenery is awesome. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot."
TRAVEL
By Mercury News | April 8, 2007
Any suggestions for arranging a family trip to Alaska this summer? If you base yourself in Anchorage and rent a car, there are plenty of things to see and do for a family, especially if your kids enjoy hiking and observing wildlife. Make sure you visit the Alaska Native Heritage Center (alaskanative.net) in Anchorage, where your children will learn about Alaska's cultural groups through workshops, demonstrations and tours of exhibits and village sites. Flattop Mountain near Anchorage is a popular hike, about three miles round-trip, with panoramic views of the city, the Chugach Range and, on a clear day, Mount McKinley (also called Denali)
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 21, 2007
It doesn't happen but maybe once or twice a lifetime, if you're lucky. It's the chance to meet someone so smart, so courageous, who inhales life so fully that you'd swear he or she couldn't possibly be for real. For me, that person was Dr. Henry Bradford Washburn. He wouldn't have liked what I just called him. The doctor part. Or the Bradford part. Or God forbid, Mr. Washburn. "It's just Brad," he'd say, waving his free hand while shaking yours. In ancient times, Washburn would have been prowling the New World or inventing something to see new stars or leading pirates against the establishment.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | June 13, 2012
Former WWEsuperstar and Fox Newsfinancial analyst John “Bradshaw” Layfield, 45, begins his years-long project today to climb each continent's highest summit in an effort to raise money for underprivileged children at Family Centre in Bermuda. Though Layfield is from Texas, he now calls the island country his home. "I ran into a friend of mine who raised a ton of money for charity climbing the seven summits,” Layfield said in a phone interview Monday. "I wanted to raise money for my at-risk kids that I work with in Bermuda and I thought this was a great way to try and do it. " WWE jumped at the opportunity to partner up with Layfield in his project and decided to help in a big way. "I reached out to [WWE chairman and CEO]
TRAVEL
September 7, 2008
John McCain's choice for a running mate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, may have been a cold shock to some pundits, but her state has long been a hot tourist destination. Alaska's rustic beauty, from Mount McKinley to the Inside Passage, attracts adventurers, nature lovers, sports enthusiasts and more. The state offers glaciers, fjords, lakes, mountains, parks, Native American culture and wildlife, to name just a few of the tourist draws. Here are five things to do in and around Anchorage: 1 Visit Wasilla : Governor Palin's hometown - and the place where she served as mayor - is about a 45-minute drive from Anchorage.
TRAVEL
By Mercury News | April 8, 2007
Any suggestions for arranging a family trip to Alaska this summer? If you base yourself in Anchorage and rent a car, there are plenty of things to see and do for a family, especially if your kids enjoy hiking and observing wildlife. Make sure you visit the Alaska Native Heritage Center (alaskanative.net) in Anchorage, where your children will learn about Alaska's cultural groups through workshops, demonstrations and tours of exhibits and village sites. Flattop Mountain near Anchorage is a popular hike, about three miles round-trip, with panoramic views of the city, the Chugach Range and, on a clear day, Mount McKinley (also called Denali)
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 21, 2007
It doesn't happen but maybe once or twice a lifetime, if you're lucky. It's the chance to meet someone so smart, so courageous, who inhales life so fully that you'd swear he or she couldn't possibly be for real. For me, that person was Dr. Henry Bradford Washburn. He wouldn't have liked what I just called him. The doctor part. Or the Bradford part. Or God forbid, Mr. Washburn. "It's just Brad," he'd say, waving his free hand while shaking yours. In ancient times, Washburn would have been prowling the New World or inventing something to see new stars or leading pirates against the establishment.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2000
IS TRYING TO balance on a ladder in the same category for you as scaling the side of Mount McKinley -- because, quite frankly, you're not as young as you used to be? Help may be just a phone call away. Partners in Care, a nonprofit organization that assists elderly and disabled adults, has a Handyman Program that offers the elderly a solution to many household maintenance problems. "Next to transporting seniors and disabled individuals to medical appointments and to get groceries, which is our No. 1 service, the most important service we offer is the Handyman Program," says Maureen Cavaiola, volunteer coordinator for Partners in Care.
TRAVEL
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Candus Thomson and Ernest F. Imhoff and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | August 29, 1999
On the first day, we scaled a 3-foot pile of rocks that marks the rooftop of Rhode Island. At the end, we walked wind-blown for hours along a knife-edge ridge on a 5,267-foot mountain in the Maine wilderness.Call our quest "Into Thick Air."Highpointing -- hiking or driving or both -- to the top of each state is a hobby of collectibles. This time our goal was reaching the highest spot in each of the six New England states in six days.They weren't Mount McKinley, at 20,320 feet the nation's highest mountain, but they weren't the lowest points either (Florida, Delaware, Mississippi and Louisiana have that distinction)
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1998
The aging debate about whether Dr. Frederick A. Cook reached the top of Mount McKinley has warmed up again, with warring sides calling each other "vicious" and each other's supporting evidence "diversions."The Frederick A. Cook Society this month returned fire against naysayers who in July blasted as a giant hoax the doctor's contention that in 1906 he was the first to ascend Alaska's Mount McKinley.In a small Baltimore-based journal, Dio, critics printed almost 100 pages of detail and declared on the cover, "Dr. Cook-Mt.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2000
IS TRYING TO balance on a ladder in the same category for you as scaling the side of Mount McKinley -- because, quite frankly, you're not as young as you used to be? Help may be just a phone call away. Partners in Care, a nonprofit organization that assists elderly and disabled adults, has a Handyman Program that offers the elderly a solution to many household maintenance problems. "Next to transporting seniors and disabled individuals to medical appointments and to get groceries, which is our No. 1 service, the most important service we offer is the Handyman Program," says Maureen Cavaiola, volunteer coordinator for Partners in Care.
TRAVEL
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Candus Thomson and Ernest F. Imhoff and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | August 29, 1999
On the first day, we scaled a 3-foot pile of rocks that marks the rooftop of Rhode Island. At the end, we walked wind-blown for hours along a knife-edge ridge on a 5,267-foot mountain in the Maine wilderness.Call our quest "Into Thick Air."Highpointing -- hiking or driving or both -- to the top of each state is a hobby of collectibles. This time our goal was reaching the highest spot in each of the six New England states in six days.They weren't Mount McKinley, at 20,320 feet the nation's highest mountain, but they weren't the lowest points either (Florida, Delaware, Mississippi and Louisiana have that distinction)
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1998
The caption accompanying a photograph of Alaska's Mount McKinley, published on Page 8A yesterday in The Sun, failed to credit the photographer, Bradford Washburn. He took the picture of the knife-edged Hairy Ridge while flying in 1956 at 11,000 feet altitude with the famed Alaskan bush pilot Don Sheldon.The Sun regrets the error.BOSTON -- A 90-year-old controversy over whether Dr. Frederick A. Cook was the first to ascend Alaska's Mount McKinley is as relentless a phenomenon as the glaciers inching down North America's highest mountain.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1998
From Harper's Magazine, May 1907, by Frederick A. Cook:After a long siege, during which we were compelled to acknowledge several disheartening defeats, we have at last conquered the highest mountain of our continent. We were not days or weeks, but months, in desperate positions, fording icy glacial streams, pushing through thick underbrush, crossing life-sapping marshes and tundras, enduring the tortures of mosquitoes, camping on the top of wind-swept peaks, and being drenched from above and below with frigid waters; in snow-storms, on ice, in gloomy canyons and gulches; on ice cornices and precipices, always with torment and death before us.Exciting, no?
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