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By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2001
CHRIS WARNER, owner of Earth Treks Climbing Center in Columbia and the first Marylander to reach the summit of Mount Everest, drew on his experiences in delivering the keynote address to new students at Howard Community College last week. Using Mount Everest as a metaphor for any challenge, Warner, 37, advised students to adhere to the tenets of passion, vision, partnership and perseverance, principles that he applied to his education and that have contributed to his success in business.
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SPORTS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Ian Yarmus can spot them when he goes down to his favorite indoor climbing gym in Rockville or when he travels to Seneca Rocks in West Virginia, the place after which he named his now 3 -year-old daughter. "I remember being 100 feet up [at Seneca], and there was a guy up there who was freaking out, he was completely paralyzed with fear," Yarmus recalled. "He was in over his head. He didn't have the skills or the training to be in the situation he was in. I had to tell him everything to do, tell him where to put every piece of equipment and what part of his body to use and where to put it in the rock.A lot of these situations put rescue personnel at risk.
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SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 12, 1993
Reading Time: Two Minutes.They're gathering at the old watering spot in Katmandu this very moment to celebrate the 40th anniversary Friday of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norkay becoming the first to make it to the top of Mount Everest. A gent named Reinhold Messner did the entire 29,000-plus feet alone and for years climbers have been doing it without oxygen. Nepal now charges expeditions a fee of $50,000.* At press time today, hockey in Baltimore, East Coast Hockey League version, was hanging on by just a couple of fingernails.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | November 23, 2008
Chris Warner has cheated the death zone, where oxygen is thin and the weather brutal, to stand atop the world's two highest peaks, Mount Everest and K2 - the only Marylander to have done so. The Annapolis resident and certified Alpine guide owns Earth Treks, with climbing gyms in Columbia, Timonium and Rockville, and leads expeditions of business school students on team-building outings to the high peaks of South America and Africa. With Don Schmincke, a Maryland-based business consultant, Warner has written a book, "High Altitude Leadership: What the World's Most Forbidding Peaks Teach Us About Success."
NEWS
By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 11, 2008
Sir Edmund Hillary, the mountain-climbing New Zealand beekeeper who became a mid-20th century hero as the first person to reach the summit of Mount Everest, has died. He was 88. Sir Edmund, who made his historic climb to the top of the world's highest mountain with the Sherpa mountaineer Tenzing Norgay of Nepal, died yesterday at a hospital in Auckland, according to an announcement from the office of New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark. The cause of death was not immediately announced.
SPORTS
By Bill Jauss and Bill Jauss,Chicago Tribune | May 12, 1991
CHICAGO -- Football, baseball, wrestling and chopping down trees as a lumberjack. Those were some of Vic Mesco's activities during his pre- and post-World War II years at Tilden Tech, Michigan State, the U.S. Navy and Illinois Tech.As a senior citizen in training, Mesco furiously rode his $700 bike around a course he set up in St. Xavier Cemetary near his home in Evergreen Park, Ill. Thus prepared, he ran, swam and biked his way to national and international age group Triathlon titles.In a triathlon, by the way, a senior citizen rides a bike for 25 miles, swims nine-tenths of a mile, and runs 6.2 miles.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | May 11, 1993
LONDON -- Will Rebecca Stephens be the first British woman to climb Mount Everest?Sometime tomorrow the world may know, if the organizers of the 40th anniversary of the first scaling of the world's highest mountain keep to their schedule.Ms. Stephens, a 31-year-old London journalist and mountain climber, was to set off tomorrow from her base camp at 26,000 feet, hoping to reach the summit at 29,021 feet in about seven hours. Then she and her partner, John Barry, would return to their base camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
Mount Everest is in a strip shopping center in Parkville. Its exterior sign promises pizza and pasta, as well as Indian and Nepali. Once inside, we learn that the pizza and pasta are only on the take-out side. The spacious and serene dining room serves food from India and Nepal (home to part of the restaurant's namesake mountain). Owners and brothers Chandra and Lok Chhantyal have another Mount Everest restaurant on Frankford Avenue. It's 4 years old and serves mostly Indian food. The new restaurant, which opened in November, also serves mostly Indian food, but the brothers plan to serve more dishes from their native Nepal, says Lok Chhantyal, who is also the chef.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2008
The new Mount Everest restaurant in Nottingham looks like it's ready to serve a banquet. Located at the Fullerton Plaza shopping center, the restaurant is as big as a health club - a Spa Lady used to be there - and dozens of tables are set and waiting for hundreds of customers. It's pretty, though, with splashes of sherbet-y colors - mint-green chairs and raspberry cloth napkins that match the prettily painted drop ceiling. The dining room is divided in two lengthwise, but there is still the problem of having too many tables for too few diners, at least on the recent weeknight when we visited.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
The Rev. Jesse Jackson once said it was attitude, not aptitude, that ultimately determined altitude. But these days - because of the combined fortitude of a few educators -students from Howard County schools can ascend to the highest point in the world without leaving their desks. As part of a program called "Shared Summits," students at several county schools have been following online the exploits of Chris Warner, the veteran mountaineer from Oella who is scheduled to reach the peak of Mount Everest - the world's highest mountain - today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2008
The new Mount Everest restaurant in Nottingham looks like it's ready to serve a banquet. Located at the Fullerton Plaza shopping center, the restaurant is as big as a health club - a Spa Lady used to be there - and dozens of tables are set and waiting for hundreds of customers. It's pretty, though, with splashes of sherbet-y colors - mint-green chairs and raspberry cloth napkins that match the prettily painted drop ceiling. The dining room is divided in two lengthwise, but there is still the problem of having too many tables for too few diners, at least on the recent weeknight when we visited.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - At least nine climbers were reported dead yesterday on K2, the world's second-highest mountain, after an avalanche struck them on a steep gully at a height of about 27,000 feet, just below the summit, mountaineering officials said. Those who died included South Koreans and Nepalese, the Pakistani television station ARY reported. Serbian, Norwegian, Dutch and French climbers were also near the summit, according to ARY. Other climbers are believed missing. The accident occurred when a chunk of an ice pillar snapped Friday, breaking fixed ropes on the area of the peak just below the summit, known as Bottleneck, according to expedition organizers.
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | February 24, 2008
HEALTH What health-related steps should I take before I go? About two months before your trip, schedule an appointment with your doctor or a travel-medicine specialist. You may need to update your vaccines or get a vaccination you've not had before. Why so early? Some vaccines take time before they become effective. How do I know what I need? You can find out which vaccines and drugs are recommended or required for your destination at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Web site (cdc.
NEWS
By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 11, 2008
Sir Edmund Hillary, the mountain-climbing New Zealand beekeeper who became a mid-20th century hero as the first person to reach the summit of Mount Everest, has died. He was 88. Sir Edmund, who made his historic climb to the top of the world's highest mountain with the Sherpa mountaineer Tenzing Norgay of Nepal, died yesterday at a hospital in Auckland, according to an announcement from the office of New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark. The cause of death was not immediately announced.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
Ella Nora S. Clarke, an avid conservationist and former city schoolteacher, died July 13 of complications from dementia at Fairhaven Retirement Community in Sykesville. The longtime Beckleysville resident was 90. Born Ella Nora Shank, she attended city schools and graduated from Forest Park High School. She earned bachelor's degrees from Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College, and the Johns Hopkins University, and she earned a master's degree from Columbia University. She taught mathematics for 20 years, initially at Hamilton Junior High and then at her alma mater, Forest Park.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | July 6, 2007
Few women have husbands who punch the clock in the "Death Zone." But when Melinda Warner married Maryland's top mountaineer nearly three years ago, she knew a large portion of every year would be spent waiting for her spouse to return from on high. This week is no different as Chris Warner gets closer to his goal of adding K2, the world's second-highest mountain, to a resume that includes Mount Everest and other massive peaks. High winds and plummeting temperatures yesterday forced the climbers to retreat to base camp and await the next window of good weather.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
Mount Everest. Top of the world. Goddess of the sky. Theme park? It's hard to keep the players straight this year on the world's highest mountain. More than 500 people -- climbers and support staff -- are on Everest's slopes, sizing up the competition and trying to find a way to distinguish their assaults from those of the other 50 or so teams. There is no end to the hype, the attempts to be first at something, as if simply climbing a mountain with a "death zone" at its 29,035-foot summit weren't enough of an accomplishment.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | February 25, 2007
KATMANDU, NEPAL // The all-seeing eyes of Buddha stare blankly over Katmandu's Palace Square from a huge wooden portal. The door is shut tight. But standing here on the very day in November when Maoist rebels signed a peace accord ending 10 years of turmoil and isolation in Nepal, I could almost hear the giant door crack open, bidding visitors back. A Hindu adage says guests are like gods. But travelers have largely stayed away since 1996 when Maoist insurgents began a terror campaign.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | May 31, 2007
While most Marylanders kick back this summer and relax at the beach or the swimming pool, Chris Warner will be grappling with a mountain that chews up and spits out most adventurers. Twice, K2 has flicked away Warner's advances with a powerful display of biting cold, brutal winds and treacherous avalanches that earned the world's second-highest peak the nickname "The Savage Mountain." For a third time, the Maryland mountaineer is taking up temporary residence at its base, hoping to tag the top of Pakistan's 28,251-foot peak somewhere around July 4, using a route no one has conquered.
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