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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2011
Police have arrested a 38-year-old man and charged him with murder in the November killing of a 30-year-old man on a Mount Clare street corner, records show. According to charging documents, Kevin Mack, also known as "G-Black," and a second man entered the intersection of South Woodyear and Kuper streets with handguns and announced a street robbery. The victim, Kevin "Chuck" Anderson, had been standing on the corner with "known associates," records show. Anderson was found dead from a gunshot wound to the back, and police recovered a .9 mm shell casing at the scene.
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NEWS
September 3, 2014
I was happy to see Jacques Kelly give the Upton Mansion some much needed attention in "Upton Mansion awaits someone to revive it. " Still, it is unfortunate that Mr. Kelly focuses on Upton's value as a historic house along the lines of Mount Clare or Homewood. There has been a lot of debate in the preservation community about the need for more house museums. Why devote limited resources to yet another monument to Baltimore estate owners, many of whom made their fortunes off slavery or owned slaves?
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FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | June 26, 1994
Mount Clare Mansion has acquired an 18th-century portrait of barrister Charles Carroll painted by John Hesselius, one of the most important Colonial portraitists.The portrait, which shows the barrister as he appeared at the time he was building Mount Clare, his summer home on an 800-acre plantation, was donated by National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of Maryland.John Hesselius was one of few artists working in the middle Colonies whose training and background was exclusively American.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Mary Jane Trolinger, a retired registered nurse who was one of the original staffers of Johns Hopkins Hospital's Columbia Medical Plan, died Friday of pneumonia at her Ellicott City home. She was 89. The daughter of a newspaper advertising salesman and a homemaker, the former Mary Jane Garrison - she never used her first name, family members said - was born in Queens, N.Y., and raised in St. Petersburg, Fla., and Tampa. After graduating in 1940 from Henry B. Plant High School in Tampa, she earned a bachelor's degree in zoology in 1944 from Florida State College for Women, now Florida State University.
FEATURES
By Bethany Nikfar and Bethany Nikfar,Contributing Writer | July 30, 1995
The National Society of Colonial Dames of America has hired Sian B. Jones, a conservation consultant from Art Conservation and Technical Services, to finalize conservation plans for the Mount Clare Museum House. The NSCDA received a grant from the Maryland Historical and Cultural Museum Consultant Program of the Small Museum Association Inc. to aid in hiring Ms. Jones, who will concentrate on guidelines for restoring the museum. The house, located in Carroll Park, needs restoration and maintenance of paintings, furniture and decorative arts that date back to the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Crystal Williams | August 17, 2000
Beat the heat the way they did in the 18th century. This Saturday, the staff at Mount Clare Museum House will give tours showing how Colonial-era residents of the house kept cool during Baltimores summers. The hour-long tours will allow visitors to view the house and learn of the seasonal adjustments the owners had to make to it and to their way of dressing to keep cool. At the end of the tour, visitors can sample ice cream made from period recipes in the house's Colonial kitchen. Tours begin at 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday at the Mount Clare Museum House in Carroll Park, 1500 Washington Blvd.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1996
During his seven years as a Marine, Lewis Jackson learned a strict, physical discipline that he hoped would help in his planned career as a youth counselor.But soon after he began work as a counselor at Mount Clare House, a Southwest Baltimore facility that houses male teen-agers with drug and alcohol problems, he learned that his tender side worked just as effectively."He was like a father figure or big brother to them," said Jesse McClain, director of operations at Mount Clare House, where Mr. Jackson worked for about 18 months.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | September 10, 2009
City police were investigating the death of a man found Wednesday afternoon in the back seat of a van parked in the Mount Clare Junction shopping center in Southwest Baltimore. Detectives said he did not appear to be the victim of foul play. The man's feet appeared to be propped up in a back window, and blood appeared to be dripping from above the left rear tire of the large red van, which had handicapped-parking plates and was in a handicap space in front of the Family Dollar store. Steven Bruns, 45, said he was walking through the parking lot when he noticed the blood and looked inside, where he saw an older man who appeared to be tied up. A police spokesman said the man appeared to be in his 50s or 60s but did not immediately have additional information.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson | July 28, 1991
Steve Ashe rose in his stirrups, dug in the spurs on the heels of his knee-high cavalry boots and yelled, "Charge!"The curved blade of his saber glinted as he extended his right arm, and Knight, his 15-year-old Tennessee walking horse, burst into a gallop as if against a line of Rebel infantry.The 49-year-old Hampstead clockmaker, uniformed in the blue of the 2nd U.S. Cavalry, was demonstrating Civil War cavalry tactics to a small but interested group of spectators gathered on the lawn of the Mount Clare Mansion, in southwest Baltimore's Carroll Park.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | October 20, 2007
Perhaps we had better lower our voices. We've come to Mount Clare in Southwest Baltimore's Carroll Park to pay our respects to Charles Carroll the Barrister, framer of Maryland's Declaration of Rights, legislator and farmer, who died -- probably from malaria, a common malady in 18th- and 19th-century tidewater Maryland -- on March 23, 1783. Life came to a close for the prominent Marylander in his second-floor bedchamber in this house. He was 60. His black coffin, with the Carroll hatchment, his coat of arms, carefully arranged on its closed lid, rested on a bier in Mount Clare's elegant parlor.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Three men were shot in separate incidents Wednesday night across Baltimore, and they were expected to survive their injuries, police said. The first man was found lying in the street in the 1300 block of North Carey Street in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood. Police said the man suffered from a gunshot wound to his buttocks, and paramedics transported him to an area hospital. Detectives do not have a motive or suspect, police said. At 6:44 p.m., police responded to a shooting in the 500 block of North Glover St. in McElderry Park, where they found a man on the ground suffering from gunshot wounds to his lower back and hand.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
The state, city and CSX Transportation have tentatively selected the Mount Clare train yard in Southwest Baltimore for a roughly $90 million facility where containerized cargo would be transferred from trucks to trains, a project designed to improve the Port of Baltimore's efficiency. The project would help the port and CSX by allowing the railroad to bypass the more than century-old Howard Street Tunnel, which is too low for passage of trains with containers stacked two high. Such double-stacking of truck-sized shipping containers is the most cost-effective way to move them by rail.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
Temperatures climbed into the 50s and gentle winds buffeted those who had gathered outside Mount Clare Mansion to celebrate its reopening and affiliation with the B&O Railroad Museum. While bystanders waited for the official ribbon-cutting ceremonies to begin last week, they reveled in the spectacular view of Baltimore from atop the gently sloping hill where Mount Clare, built in 1760, stands overlooking Southwest Baltimore's Carroll Park. The Monumental City Fife and Drum Corps, dressed in colorful period costumes and wearing tricorn hats, serenaded those waiting with a selection of peppy 18th- and 19th-century airs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2011
Ina W. Hubard, a homemaker who had been an active member of the Daughters of the American Revolution throughout her life, died April 13 of heart failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Lutherville resident was 94. Ina Walker, the daughter of a career Navy officer and a homemaker, was born and raised in Annapolis. She attended the Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School and graduated from the old Gunston Hall School in 1934. Two years later, she married Randolph Bolling Hubard, a West Point graduate and career Army officer.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2011
Police have arrested a 38-year-old man and charged him with murder in the November killing of a 30-year-old man on a Mount Clare street corner, records show. According to charging documents, Kevin Mack, also known as "G-Black," and a second man entered the intersection of South Woodyear and Kuper streets with handguns and announced a street robbery. The victim, Kevin "Chuck" Anderson, had been standing on the corner with "known associates," records show. Anderson was found dead from a gunshot wound to the back, and police recovered a .9 mm shell casing at the scene.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 3, 2010
The closing of a supermarket in a Baltimore suburb is hardly big news; most of the people affected by it usually just drive to the next available store. In the city, the condition is more delicate; Baltimore is eager to attract new stores, not see them close. So, in that regard, I found it surprising that the only person to call me about the looming closure of the Safeway in Mount Clare, on the city's southwest side, was the guy who runs the check-cashing place next door. Robert Rombro, of the Cash Bar, worries he'll lose customers if the Safeway closes, but he also had this to say: "There are no other major supermarkets in the area, and the local residents will have to find transportation to the county; most don't drive.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1996
The Carroll Park Foundation has received grants totaling $150,000 to begin work on Carroll's Hundred, a "living history park" anchored by Mount Clare Mansion in Southwest Baltimore.A $125,000 federal grant will be used to begin archaeological excavations and for improvements on the property, which eventually will include a reconstructed 18th-century village that will depict life in Colonial Maryland.The money is part of $600,000 in "enhancement" funds awarded to Baltimore this year under the federal Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991.
NEWS
By D. Quentin Wilber and D. Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1997
Lisa Plumley drove her shovel into the hard ground and struck a centuries-old brick, sending a metallic echo over the sloping terraces below Mount Clare Mansion in Carroll Park.The 24-year-old archaeologist looked at not-so-distant Baltimore high-rises and then at the perfectly marked section of ground under her feet."I'm really interested in 18th-century life," said Plumley, who was digging to find the foundations of a period greenhouse. "The people who ran [the greenhouse] weren't the people living in the house.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | November 9, 2009
Months ago, a homeless man entered Dwayne Hess' West Baltimore coffeehouse. He took in the scene for a few minutes, had a warm beverage, then headed for the door. Before he left, the man turned toward Hess, whom he had never met before, and said something that continues to stick with the former Mennonite farmer. The man, disheveled and obviously down on his luck, spoke of being shunned at other places, some as unremarkable as gas stations, but welcomed without reservation at the coffeehouse.
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