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Moulin Rouge

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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 1, 2001
"Moulin Rouge" is a boy-meets-courtesan story set in turn-of-last-century Montmartre and dressed up in psychedelic corsets. It wants to be like no other movie you've ever seen. It's more like every movie you've ever seen, only shredded and reformed into bales of Day-Glo confetti. The Australian director, Baz Luhrmann ("Strictly Ballroom" and "William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet") has a penchant for the prolonged paroxysm. When the middle-class poet hero (Ewan McGregor) is sullen or melancholy, the lights go out all over Paris.
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By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Tribune Newspapers | December 13, 2009
'Paris Postcards: The Golden Age' Counterpoint, $24.95: For many years they were taken for granted, but to author and collector Leonard Pitt, hand-painted French postcards from the late 19th and early 20th centuries are "little works of art." They also serve as historical documents. In this gorgeous collection, Pitt has chosen postcards that show a Paris that no longer exists. The postcard, he writes, "revolutionized communication and created the first form of social networking equivalent to today's e-mail."
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | June 3, 2001
At first glance, Nicole Kidman resembles a delicate princess with alabaster skin and saintly grace, perched on a swing while gently descending upon her adoring masses in the new movie "Moulin Rouge." Then the camera pans to her bawdy black fishnet stockings. There's her glittery showgirl outfit, with a flap between the thighs that drips with swishy silver strands. Finally, we see the teasing, salacious smile on her face. And voila, fashion has a new pop princess. With its risque can-can dancers and corset-dresses galore, "Moulin Rouge" not only is a tantalizing visual orgy of a movie that's set in 1900 Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
By McClatchy-Tribune | July 2, 2009
It takes a while for John Leguizamo to get into sloth. "I've got to walk around the house a lot the day before, working on the lisp so that it's not too much, that it's just right," he says, demonstrating. Sloths have lisps, or didn't you know? The ancient ground sloths did, as Leguizamo interprets Sid the Sloth in the Ice Age animated films. "Sid's a vulnerable character, with a higher-pitched voice than you'd think. So I have to tighten up, get the voice up there so that he doesn't sound like a sloth who's been out partying all night.
TRAVEL
By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Tribune Newspapers | December 13, 2009
'Paris Postcards: The Golden Age' Counterpoint, $24.95: For many years they were taken for granted, but to author and collector Leonard Pitt, hand-painted French postcards from the late 19th and early 20th centuries are "little works of art." They also serve as historical documents. In this gorgeous collection, Pitt has chosen postcards that show a Paris that no longer exists. The postcard, he writes, "revolutionized communication and created the first form of social networking equivalent to today's e-mail."
NEWS
By Phil Perrier | March 24, 2002
LOS ANGELES -- Judging from this year's Academy Award nominees, you would think all of the male members of the academy had been knocked unconscious and locked in a basement. The contenders for Best Picture are A Beautiful Mind, Gosford Park, In the Bedroom, The Lord of the Rings and Moulin Rouge. Oprah Winfrey's book club could have made these choices. Not one movie about soldiers, gladiators or cowboys. Perhaps after decades of critics bemoaning the lack of quality small films being nominated, this is a makeup year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | May 20, 2001
CANNES, France -- A glamorous setting. A star in distress. Elements that can make the Cannes Film Festival about everything but film fell into place when Nicole Kidman came to the French Riviera. "Moulin Rouge," the audacious musical she carries as a can-can girl who wants to be an actress, opened the festival, which closes today, and will debut in Baltimore June 1. Kidman's real-life story is now playing in a tabloid near you. Despite personal turmoil, she smiled, smiled, smiled during the movie's three-day barnstorming here.
NEWS
March 17, 1992
Buchwald story idea gets him $150,000Paramount Pictures was ordered yesterday to pay Art Buchwald $150,000 and his partner $750,000 for their contributions to the hit 1988 Eddie Murphy movie "Coming to America."Judge Harvey Schneider, who ordered the award, had ruled in January 1990 that the movie was based upon a screenplay idea submitted by Mr. Buchwald.Mr. Buchwald and his producing partner, Alain Bernheim, had sought a joint award of $6.2 million. They said their legal fees exceeded $3 million.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 13, 2004
In the final decade of the 19th century, the bohemian quarter of Paris known as Montmartre was home to a remarkable community of avant-garde writers, artists and performers whose works would help change the course of modern art. Among them was a headstrong, rebellious painter of genius from a proud aristocratic family that traced its lineage back to the Crusades. Henri Toulouse-Lautrec was just 26 years old in 1891, when his first poster advertising Montmartre's racy night life suddenly appeared on walls all over Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
By McClatchy-Tribune | July 2, 2009
It takes a while for John Leguizamo to get into sloth. "I've got to walk around the house a lot the day before, working on the lisp so that it's not too much, that it's just right," he says, demonstrating. Sloths have lisps, or didn't you know? The ancient ground sloths did, as Leguizamo interprets Sid the Sloth in the Ice Age animated films. "Sid's a vulnerable character, with a higher-pitched voice than you'd think. So I have to tighten up, get the voice up there so that he doesn't sound like a sloth who's been out partying all night.
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 12, 2008
L ola Montes is the ultimate bird in a gilded cage movie, though celebrated filmmaker Max Ophuls built it around a bird who had one song and couldn't really flap her wings. If you wandered into the film not knowing anything about its history or its director, now obscure beyond film schools, you would wonder whom this dazzling visual artist was. You might also lament how cruel it was for fate to have plopped an inexpressive beauty into the center of a film that is otherwise a marvel of choreography and vision.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 13, 2004
In the final decade of the 19th century, the bohemian quarter of Paris known as Montmartre was home to a remarkable community of avant-garde writers, artists and performers whose works would help change the course of modern art. Among them was a headstrong, rebellious painter of genius from a proud aristocratic family that traced its lineage back to the Crusades. Henri Toulouse-Lautrec was just 26 years old in 1891, when his first poster advertising Montmartre's racy night life suddenly appeared on walls all over Paris.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 3, 2003
1. Rabbit-Proof Fence: Under Phillip Noyce's starkly poetic (and wonderfully unforced) direction, this tale of three Aboriginal girls walking across 1,200 miles of the Australian Outback simply to go home was everything a classic movie should be. Beautifully acted by a largely amateur cast, with a haunting score by Peter Gabriel, it served as a reminder that there's no substitute for a good story well told. 2. Chicago: Director Rob Marshall doesn't so much reimagine the movie musical (as Baz Luhrmann did in 2001 in Moulin Rouge)
NEWS
By Phil Perrier | March 24, 2002
LOS ANGELES -- Judging from this year's Academy Award nominees, you would think all of the male members of the academy had been knocked unconscious and locked in a basement. The contenders for Best Picture are A Beautiful Mind, Gosford Park, In the Bedroom, The Lord of the Rings and Moulin Rouge. Oprah Winfrey's book club could have made these choices. Not one movie about soldiers, gladiators or cowboys. Perhaps after decades of critics bemoaning the lack of quality small films being nominated, this is a makeup year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
When Nicole Kidman rose to accept her Golden Globe for the seizure-inducing Moulin Rouge last weekend, it was more than an impossibly gorgeous Aussie accepting a fake Oscar, it was high drama: Striking divorcee enjoys career high in aftermath of traumatic breakup, while ex-hubbie and his fiery Latina munchkin, whom he may have recently wed in Colorado (juicy, juicy!) are nowhere to be seen. We don't know Nicole, but we think we know her story, and in that is a lesson for us all. Three months ago, the cult of celebrity worship -- America's passion for knowing, or at least being fed, the iffy info about superstar private lives -- was predicted to perish.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | June 3, 2001
At first glance, Nicole Kidman resembles a delicate princess with alabaster skin and saintly grace, perched on a swing while gently descending upon her adoring masses in the new movie "Moulin Rouge." Then the camera pans to her bawdy black fishnet stockings. There's her glittery showgirl outfit, with a flap between the thighs that drips with swishy silver strands. Finally, we see the teasing, salacious smile on her face. And voila, fashion has a new pop princess. With its risque can-can dancers and corset-dresses galore, "Moulin Rouge" not only is a tantalizing visual orgy of a movie that's set in 1900 Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
When Nicole Kidman rose to accept her Golden Globe for the seizure-inducing Moulin Rouge last weekend, it was more than an impossibly gorgeous Aussie accepting a fake Oscar, it was high drama: Striking divorcee enjoys career high in aftermath of traumatic breakup, while ex-hubbie and his fiery Latina munchkin, whom he may have recently wed in Colorado (juicy, juicy!) are nowhere to be seen. We don't know Nicole, but we think we know her story, and in that is a lesson for us all. Three months ago, the cult of celebrity worship -- America's passion for knowing, or at least being fed, the iffy info about superstar private lives -- was predicted to perish.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 1, 2001
"Moulin Rouge" is a boy-meets-courtesan story set in turn-of-last-century Montmartre and dressed up in psychedelic corsets. It wants to be like no other movie you've ever seen. It's more like every movie you've ever seen, only shredded and reformed into bales of Day-Glo confetti. The Australian director, Baz Luhrmann ("Strictly Ballroom" and "William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet") has a penchant for the prolonged paroxysm. When the middle-class poet hero (Ewan McGregor) is sullen or melancholy, the lights go out all over Paris.
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