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By RASHOD D. OLLISON | November 2, 2006
Mama and Motown had grown up together; they were close friends with delicious secrets. As a child, I remember how the music would change her face, taking her off to another place. Smiling, with her eyes closed sometimes, Mama was transported to her happy teenage years of creamy skin and bouffant hair in the 1960s. The stress of holding down two full-time jobs and raising three very difficult children melted whenever Marvin moaned, the Temptations crooned or the Supremes chirped about the sting and glory of love.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
Paul W. "Scottie" Scott, a retired Maryland Transit Administration bus driver who was an ardent collector of Motown music and artifacts that earned him the sobriquet of "Mr. Motown," died Friday of bladder cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 78. Born to working-class parents in Baltimore, Paul Wesley Scott was raised in East Baltimore, where he graduated in 1953 from Dunbar High School. He joined the Navy in the mid-1950s, serving as a steward. "During his brief leaves, he loved to party to the sounds of Etta James, Ray Charles, Clyde McPhatter, Sam Cooke, the Coasters, Tina Turner, Otis Redding, Elvis, Chuck Berry, Billie Holiday, the Temptations, and the list goes on and on," said Sherrell Claiborne, a granddaughter, who lives in Owings Mills.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 1998
The Annapolis Chorale took us on a musical journey last weekend from Maryland Hall to the Salzburg of Mozart, conveying the delicacy and refinement of his music, then to the Detroit of Berry Gordy, nailing the beat and soul of Motown.The Annapolis Chamber Orchestra strings were heard in a sprightly, exhilarating "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik." The musicians brought depth and freshness to this familiar favorite of the Austrian composer.The orchestra expanded to include woodwinds and solo pianist Stefan Scaggiari in Mozart's Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 23 (K488)
NEWS
By Amy Watts | April 24, 2012
They start the show with a ridiculous graphic of Gavin in his rowboat on the dance floor, getting overwhelmed by a giant wave. Oh, silly dancing show, it's fun when you have a little bit of a big budget. It's Motown night and one can only hope that they've managed to rescue 71-year-old Fontella Bass for a performance on Motown night. That song is absolutely on my "Desert Island Jukebox. " Oh, cool - they've got a  spotlight replica of the Motown logo on the dance floor. And we start off with a performance from Smokey Robinson, "Tracks of My Tears" while the troupe dances.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 1, 1992
"Singles are the essence of rock and roll," writes Dave Mars in the introduction to his book, "The Heart of Rock & Soul." As he rightly points out, singles are "the stuff of our everyday conversations and debates about music, the totems that trigger our memories." And anyone who has ever been riveted by a song on the radio, or transported by unexpectedly hearing a favorite ,, oldie knows exactly what he means.As such, it would be hard to imagine a better synopsis of the Motown era than the one provided by "Hitsville U.S.A."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter M. Nichols and Peter M. Nichols,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 2003
Acouple of days ago, the Funk Brothers were on a bus outside Pittsburgh, about to head to a gig in Toronto. "We're loading up some Diet Pepsi, but it should be Diet Coke," joked the percussionist Jack Ashford by cell phone. In Paul Justman's documentary Standing in the Shadows of Motown, now available in a DVD special edition from Artisan, the brothers travel by station wagon. Justman's film dramatizes those early tours by the now recognized but then unknown (and unrelated) group of studio jazz and R&B artists who laid down the extraordinary rhythm for Motown stars like Marvin Gaye, Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross and the Supremes and the Temptations.
NEWS
November 14, 1999
Gwendolyn Gordy Fuqua, 71, who helped her music mogul brother Berry Gordy Jr. form Motown Records, died of cancer Monday in San Diego. Mrs. Fuqua and her sister, Anna, led Motown's famous artist development department, where Mrs. Fuqua helped guide such Motown stars as the Supremes, Martha and the Vandellas, and the Temptations.Robert Kramer,60, an American movie director who devoted his career to capturing dissident movements from Vietnam war protesters to Latin American guerrillas, died Wednesday at Rouen Hospital in Normandy from meningitis, French news media reported.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 7, 1991
Did he, or didn't he?Did the late David Ruffin sing on the Temptations single "Cloud Nine," as my appreciation last Sunday said? Or was it Dennis Edwards doing the singing, as the "Cloud Nine" album notes (and many Sun readers) claim?And why would there be any doubt over who sang what in the first place?To answer the last question first, let's go back to Saturday afternoon when I first heard that Ruffin had died of an apparent overdose. Given two hours to write my article, I turned to my reference library - in particular to Nelson George's "Where Did Our Love Go?"
NEWS
February 5, 2007
Joe Hunter, 79 Motown bandleader Joe Hunter, a three-time Grammy winner with the Funk Brothers, died Friday in Detroit. The first hire of Motown legend Berry Gordy Jr., he backed up acts such as Smokey Robinson and the Miracles on piano in the late 1950s. Mr. Hunter also served as Motown's first bandleader in the early days. The Funk Brothers - celebrated in the 2002 documentary film Standing in the Shadows of Motown - played backup on many Motown recordings. Mr. Hunter's piano work was an integral part of such songs as Martha and the Vandellas' "Heat Wave" and Marvin Gaye's "Pride and Joy."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Staff | August 28, 2003
The name Leon Ware probably doesn't ring any bells right away. But you've heard his music before, have probably been pulled under by its heated sensuality. Few know that Marvin Gaye's 1976 bedroom classic I Want You (the bulk of it, anyway) was actually Leon's album before Marvin recorded it and made it a smash. Universal Records has just reissued a two-disc deluxe edition of that album and Musical Massage, Leon's overlooked funk-and-candlelight masterwork from '76. A songwriter at Motown, Leon had written hits for such label artists as the Miracles and Michael Jackson.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | September 30, 2011
Just as the Supremes climbed their way to the top of the pop music charts in the early 1960s, the suspiciously similar soul trio called the Dreams claws its way to the top in Michael Bennett's 1981 Broadway musical "Dreamgirls. " These biographical connections are made loud and clear in the crowd-pleasing production of "Dreamgirls" at Toby's Baltimore Dinner Theatre. Everything is made loud, if not always clear, in a staging whose sound levels take an already-boisterous show into decibel-elevated territory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2011
"I'm having a little difficulty absorbing the news I just got," said Martha Reeves, after hearing that Gladys Horton, the original lead singer of the Marvelettes, had died at 66 in a California nursing home. Though she hadn't spoken with Horton in 30 years — she had stayed in Detroit, while Horton moved to California — news of her death hit Reeves hard. Without the Marvelettes, Martha and the Vandellas would not have been. "They were our pioneers," she said. In recent years, many of Motown's stars have died.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
Stephanie Beattie called her upset win in the $100,000 William Donald Schaefer Stakes the highlight of her career, and it was the first of back-to-back victories for female trainers Saturday during Preakness Day at Pimlico Race Course. Beattie's No Advantage, at 12-1 odds, charged past two horses down the stretch to win the Grade III race by 2 3/4 lengths. No Advantage pressed pacesetters Real Merchant and Crimson Comic to the far turn before charging past them on the outside to gain control.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | October 9, 2007
ICAN'T listen to too much Wagner, ya know? I start to get the urge to conquer Poland," said the perspicacious Woody Allen. (Just had to use that, although it has nothing to do with what follows except it's about music.) I am one of those old softies who did and still do love Motown! Now, coming on Nov. 13, Boyz II Men, one of the most successful R&B groups of all time, will return as a threesome - Nathan Morris, Wanya Morris and Shawn Stockman - with a new CD called Motown: A Journey Through Hitsville USA. Motown returns these guys to the limelight, features songs that turned us all on in the past and even includes a track produced by Brian McKnight.
BUSINESS
By Detroit Free Press | March 1, 2007
WASHINGTON -- If there's an eternal optimist still floating around the offices of Detroit's automakers, it might be wise to keep him away from Consumer Reports' latest overview of the best and worst cars and trucks. Sure, the bible of consumer reviews had some positive words in its annual auto issue released yesterday for Ford Motor Co.'s mid-size sedans, and it noted some improvement in the fit and finish on General Motors Corp.'s newest models. But, as occurred last year, no Detroit vehicle ranked in the magazine's 10 Top Picks, in which Toyota Motor Co. and Honda Motor Co. had seven models.
NEWS
February 5, 2007
Joe Hunter, 79 Motown bandleader Joe Hunter, a three-time Grammy winner with the Funk Brothers, died Friday in Detroit. The first hire of Motown legend Berry Gordy Jr., he backed up acts such as Smokey Robinson and the Miracles on piano in the late 1950s. Mr. Hunter also served as Motown's first bandleader in the early days. The Funk Brothers - celebrated in the 2002 documentary film Standing in the Shadows of Motown - played backup on many Motown recordings. Mr. Hunter's piano work was an integral part of such songs as Martha and the Vandellas' "Heat Wave" and Marvin Gaye's "Pride and Joy."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 18, 1995
There's a song on Michael Jackson's new album, "HIStory," in which he asks, "Have you seen my childhood?"No, but we sure did hear it.Michael Jackson has been a part of the national consciousness from the moment the Jackson 5's "I Want You Back" first crackled across the radio in December 1969. He may only have been 11 years old, but he sang with greater skill and conviction than competitors two or three times his age; even better, his boyish good looks left adults doting and other children dazzled.
NEWS
February 1, 2000
Betty Macdonald Batcheller, 92, an original member of Martha Graham's first dance company in the 1920s, died Jan. 15 in Greenwich, Conn. She joined two dancers to perform in Miss Graham's first independent program as a choreographer at the 48th Street Theater in Manhattan in April 1926. Friedrich Gulda, 69, widely considered one of Austria's foremost classical and jazz pianists, died Thursday in Vienna, Austria, of an apparent heart attack. He was praised by music critics for his interpretation of the piano music of Beethoven, Bach and Mozart.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | December 21, 2006
Is Deena Jones Diana Ross? Are the Dreamettes really the Supremes? Dreamgirls, the much-buzzed-about movie version of the 1981 hit Broadway musical, doesn't say so flat out. But the costumes in the film (in theaters nationally Christmas Day) -- from the many extravagant gowns to those used for the transformation of the once-meek lead character into a fabulous, fashionable diva -- say it all too well. "This is pure, unadulterated glamour," says Jacqui Stafford, executive style director for Shape magazine, about the outfits worn in the film by Deena Jones (Beyonce Knowles)
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | November 2, 2006
Mama and Motown had grown up together; they were close friends with delicious secrets. As a child, I remember how the music would change her face, taking her off to another place. Smiling, with her eyes closed sometimes, Mama was transported to her happy teenage years of creamy skin and bouffant hair in the 1960s. The stress of holding down two full-time jobs and raising three very difficult children melted whenever Marvin moaned, the Temptations crooned or the Supremes chirped about the sting and glory of love.
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