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BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | August 24, 2006
CHICAGO -- Remember the Knack? A monster hit called "My Sharona" catapulted the band to fame in the late 1970s - briefly. The Knack couldn't follow up, and quickly descended to trivia fodder. The flubbed follow-up? The business world is littered with them. Motorola Inc., of Schaumburg, Ill., knows this only too well: Its StarTAC mobile phone in the late 1990s was a smash, setting a new design standard. But Motorola couldn't sustain the momentum, and went into a tailspin that ended only within the past two years.
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NEWS
August 17, 2008
DONALD ERB, 81 Electronic composer Donald Erb, a composer with a strong interest in electronic music who was prominent on the avant-garde scene of the 1960s and 1970s, died last week at his home in Cleveland Heights, Ohio. His death Tuesday came after a long illness, said his wife, Lucille Erb. Mr. Erb, who was professor emeritus of composition at the Cleveland Institute of Music, composed Reconnaissance, one of the first chamber works for live synthesizer and acoustic instruments. It had its premiere in New York in 1967 with Robert Moog, a pioneer of the synthesizer, playing that instrument.
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BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | December 4, 2005
I've owned Motorola Inc. shares for five years. I've been happy with them for a while, but remember when they weren't so hot and worry if this could happen again. What do you think? - K.C., via the Internet Performance lately has been sharp as a razor. Sales of the ultra-slim, upscale Razr cell phone helped profits more than triple, to $1.75 billion in the most recent quarter. New Razr-style models also appear promising. Motorola says its global share of the rapidly growing cell-phone market has risen to 18.6 percent, compared with 13.3 percent about a year ago. That ranks second, behind Nokia Corp.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 7, 2007
SHANGHAI, China -- After concerns over pet food, toothpaste, seafood and defective tires, China may now have to cope with another consumer product disaster: exploding batteries in mobile phones. Chinese regulators in southern Guangdong province, one of the world's biggest electronics manufacturing centers, said this week that they had found Motorola and Nokia mobile phone batteries that failed safety tests and were prone to explode under certain conditions. The batteries were said to be manufactured at the Beijing operations of Motorola and Sanyo of Japan, and were being distributed by companies based in Guangdong province, which is near Hong Kong and is one of China's biggest export centers.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | September 2, 1995
NEW YORK - AT&T Corp. and Motorola Inc. won a $1 billion contract to supply wireless equipment to a venture formed by three regional Bell companies and AirTouch Communications Inc.Under the agreement, AT&T Network Systems, a unit of AT&T, and Motorola will supply equipment to PCS PrimeCo, an alliance of Nynex Corp., Bell Atlantic Corp., U.S. West Inc. and AirTouch. With the equipment, PCS PrimeCo will provide the next generation of wireless voice and data services, known as personal communications services, or PCS.The contract, expected to be one of the largest awarded, gives the edge in supplying PCS equipment to AT&T and Motorola.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 7, 1993
Kaleida Labs Inc., Motorola Inc. and Scientific-Atlanta Inc. said yesterday that they had agreed to jointly develop software and hardware for the delivery of interactive and multimedia services to homes through cable television networks.The new alliance would pose a challenge to Intel Corp., Microsoft Corp. and General Instrument Corp., which earlier this spring announced an alliance to develop a set-top device.Under the agreement, Kaleida -- a joint venture of Apple Computer Inc. and IBM -- would supply its multimedia software, ScriptX, for use in set-top devices and network equipment.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | October 26, 1994
Carroll County received only one bid by the Oct. 19 deadline on a project to upgrade its antiquated radio dispatch system, according to county officials.The Emergency Services Operations agency wants to establish a new, 800 megahertz, high-tech communications system for police, fire and medic units and other government agencies. The system is expected to cost about $6 million, officials say.The bid was received from Motorola Corp. Two other companies that initially showed an interest in bidding for the contract did not present their bids on time and requested an extension until December, according to J. Michael Evans, director of the county's Department of General Services.
BUSINESS
By Anthony Ramirez and Anthony Ramirez,New York Times News Service | February 11, 1992
NEW YORK --Two of the world's largest telecommunications companies, Northern Telecom Ltd. of Canada and Motorola Inc. of the United States, said yesterday that they planned to market their equipment jointly to large operators of cellular telephone systems, many of which have been buying equipment from rivals such as AT&T and LM Ericsson AB of Sweden.The move is intended to strengthen the competitiveness of both companies, which had competed directly in some digital switches, the giant multimillion-dollar computers that can field thousands of calls.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 26, 1993
CHICAGO -- Like many business people, Wanda Melton has never worried that using a portable cellular telephone would cause her health problems."I'm not aware of any health-related risks from using my car phone," said Ms. Melton, a real estate agent in Annapolis, Md. "There are five or six agents in our office who use car phones, and I don't think any of them are concerned about their safety."In fact, cellular telephone manufacturers are in the middle of a growing battle about the safety of the devices, as questions arise about the high-frequency electromagnetic waves used in cellular technology.
BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | September 20, 2006
Motorola Inc. said yesterday that it would pay $3.9 billion in cash for Symbol Technologies, the leading maker of bar code readers and rugged mobile computers. The deal is expected to be completed late this year or early in 2007. It's Motorola's biggest acquisition since its $17 billion buyout of cable TV equipment maker General Instrument Corp. in 2000. Analysts generally praised the deal, saying it was priced fairly and should help Motorola broaden its customer base. "It's ultimately a good strategic move," said Bill Choi, an analyst at Jefferies & Co. Motorola's stock fell 2 cents yesterday, closing at $24.93.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | May 5, 2007
NEW YORK -- Carl C. Icahn, the billionaire investor seeking a spot on Motorola Inc.'s board, has won the support of ClearBridge Advisors, gaining one of the phone maker's biggest shareholders as an ally. ClearBridge, which owns 54 million Motorola shares, plans to vote for Icahn at Monday's annual meeting, according to a statement by the firm yesterday. ClearBridge, owned by Legg Mason Inc. of Baltimore, is the largest shareholder to back Icahn so far. ClearBridge's support may help Icahn put more pressure on Motorola Chief Executive Officer Edward N. Zander, at the helm as the world's second-biggest phone maker posted its first sales decline in almost four years amid price cuts.
BUSINESS
By David Ho .. and David Ho ..,Cox News Service | March 29, 2007
ORLANDO, Fla. -- The coming debut of the pricey Apple iPhone loomed over the wireless industry's annual show, but executives from its carrier, AT&T Inc., were smiling about a different kind of handset - one that will cost a mere $20. The Motorola C139 is part of the Go Phone line of prepaid cellular handsets, a market that is a "golden opportunity," said Glenn Lurie, president of national distribution for AT&T's Atlanta-based mobile division, which is...
BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | March 22, 2007
CHICAGO -- Frank Hernandez usually doesn't carry a wallet when he strolls through Discover Financial Services' sprawling headquarters in north suburban Riverwoods, Ill. Even when he recently stopped at a canteen to buy a morning snack - Gatorade and a rice crispy bar - there was no wallet in sight. No cash or plastic either. He used his cell phone to pay, swiping it over an electronic reader. Hernandez is one of almost 100 Discover employees testing what the credit-card industry hopes will become a household staple: the wallet phone.
BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | January 20, 2007
Lopping 3,500 jobs will be easy for Motorola Inc. as it tries to regain its lost momentum. But coming out with new chart-topping mobile phones -- and getting premium numbers like the Razr once did -- will be a lot tougher, analysts say. Motorola executives laid out plans to cope with a shortfall in profits in a meeting yesterday with Wall Street analysts in New York. Cost cutting, including shedding about 5 percent of its global work force, or 3,500 jobs, should save Motorola $400 million over two years, they said.
BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | September 20, 2006
Motorola Inc. said yesterday that it would pay $3.9 billion in cash for Symbol Technologies, the leading maker of bar code readers and rugged mobile computers. The deal is expected to be completed late this year or early in 2007. It's Motorola's biggest acquisition since its $17 billion buyout of cable TV equipment maker General Instrument Corp. in 2000. Analysts generally praised the deal, saying it was priced fairly and should help Motorola broaden its customer base. "It's ultimately a good strategic move," said Bill Choi, an analyst at Jefferies & Co. Motorola's stock fell 2 cents yesterday, closing at $24.93.
BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | August 24, 2006
CHICAGO -- Remember the Knack? A monster hit called "My Sharona" catapulted the band to fame in the late 1970s - briefly. The Knack couldn't follow up, and quickly descended to trivia fodder. The flubbed follow-up? The business world is littered with them. Motorola Inc., of Schaumburg, Ill., knows this only too well: Its StarTAC mobile phone in the late 1990s was a smash, setting a new design standard. But Motorola couldn't sustain the momentum, and went into a tailspin that ended only within the past two years.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 12, 1994
TOKYO -- Motorola Inc. and a Japanese company have reached a basic agreement that will expand Motorola's access to Japan's cellular telephone market, a Motorola official said yesterday.The agreement with Nippon Idou Tsushin Corp. is likely to avert threatened sanctions by the United States against Japan by removing one dispute between the countries. But the cellular telephone issue is separate from a broader disagreement over the comprehensive trade talks that broke down last month.Government and industry officials from both nations said they expected a formal announcement early next week, though it could come as soon as today.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 9, 2002
SCHAUMBURG, Ill. - Motorola Inc., the second-largest maker of mobile phones, will fire about 20 percent of its top 600 executives this quarter as the company eliminates almost a third of its work force over two years. Chief Executive Officer Christopher B. Galvin decided to make the cuts because the company "can't justify the number of executives we have in our ranks," spokeswoman Margot Brown said. The number of top managers, with titles of vice president or higher, had been constant through a sales decline.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | December 4, 2005
I've owned Motorola Inc. shares for five years. I've been happy with them for a while, but remember when they weren't so hot and worry if this could happen again. What do you think? - K.C., via the Internet Performance lately has been sharp as a razor. Sales of the ultra-slim, upscale Razr cell phone helped profits more than triple, to $1.75 billion in the most recent quarter. New Razr-style models also appear promising. Motorola says its global share of the rapidly growing cell-phone market has risen to 18.6 percent, compared with 13.3 percent about a year ago. That ranks second, behind Nokia Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN CARPENTER and SUSAN CARPENTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 10, 2005
Tired of that boring white iPod? How about that bottom-of-the-line phone you got with your wireless plan? Maybe you should put some bling on that thing. You know, ice it with a little python skin or dress it up with a Christtian Dior antenna trinket. "Pimped," "iced," "blinged out." Whatever you want to call them, decked-out gadgets -- as well as couture and luxury models -- are reaching ever-escalating heights of outrageousness. From Gucci iPod cases to emerald-laden Treos, they've gone far beyond the Swarovski crystal-encrusted cells made famous by status-obsessed starlets such as Paris Hilton.
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