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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
If a rider needed to know what bus to take and where to catch it, John W. Linnemann Jr., a retired state Mass Transit Administration information services operator, had the answers."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Carvey G. Davis Jr., a former Baltimore Transit Co. motorman who never lost his affection for streetcars and was a longtime supporter and benefactor of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of bone cancer Saturday at his Glen Burnie home. He was 90. "Some of Carvey's fondest memories were running and riding streetcars," said John O'Neill, longtime Baltimore Streetcar Museum president, who lives in Jarrettsville. "He was the ultimate rail fan and the last link for all of us to the great era of Baltimore streetcars," said Martin K. Van Horn, a Pennsylvania Railroad historian and streetcar museum member.
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NEWS
November 16, 2006
Grover C. Overcash, a retired MTA bus driver and former streetcar motorman, died of Alzheimer's disease Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 90. Mr. Overcash was born and raised in Mooresville, N.C. After graduating from high school in 1934, he worked in the highway and roads division of the North Carolina Department of Public Works. In 1942, he moved to Baltimore and took a job as a sheet metal worker at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River, building airplanes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
William E. Mosley, a retired Maryland Transit Administration subway motorman and World War II veteran, died June 8 of undetermined causes at Manor Care Health Services — Woodbridge Valley in Catonsville. He was 90. William Edward Mosley was born and raised in West Baltimore. After graduating in 1942 from George Washington Carver Vocational-Technical High School, he enlisted in the Army. Mr. Mosley served with the infantry in Africa, Corsica, Italy and France, and was in the second wave of troops landing at Normandy on June 6, 1944.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Carvey G. Davis Jr., a former Baltimore Transit Co. motorman who never lost his affection for streetcars and was a longtime supporter and benefactor of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of bone cancer Saturday at his Glen Burnie home. He was 90. "Some of Carvey's fondest memories were running and riding streetcars," said John O'Neill, longtime Baltimore Streetcar Museum president, who lives in Jarrettsville. "He was the ultimate rail fan and the last link for all of us to the great era of Baltimore streetcars," said Martin K. Van Horn, a Pennsylvania Railroad historian and streetcar museum member.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | May 22, 2008
Oliver W. Green Sr., a former streetcar motorman who became the first African-American international secretary-treasurer of the Amalgamated Transit Union in Chevy Chase, died Sunday of complications after a stroke at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The longtime Northwood resident was 77. "Oliver Green was truly one of the great ATU international officers of the 20th century. His devotion to the causes of the transit worker and labor was unparalleled, and the kindness and compassion he showed in his service was appreciated by everyone he worked with, particularly International Headquarters," Warren S. George, international president of the ATU, said in a statement released yesterday "He was a trailblazer who fought for the rights of minorities in the labor movement."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
William E. Mosley, a retired Maryland Transit Administration subway motorman and World War II veteran, died June 8 of undetermined causes at Manor Care Health Services — Woodbridge Valley in Catonsville. He was 90. William Edward Mosley was born and raised in West Baltimore. After graduating in 1942 from George Washington Carver Vocational-Technical High School, he enlisted in the Army. Mr. Mosley served with the infantry in Africa, Corsica, Italy and France, and was in the second wave of troops landing at Normandy on June 6, 1944.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service TC | May 12, 1993
NEW YORK -- Keron Thomas' obsession with subway trains did not begin in early childhood because in early childhood he was in Trinidad, and Trinidad does not have trains.But, oh, when he got to New York.He fell in love with the cruising, squealing monsters. Keron, 16, sometimes rode them just for fun. He hung around subway stations and learned the lingo of the motorman. He got his hands on the Transit Authority's book of rules and regulations and thumbed it until its cover was creased. He hung Transit Authority posters in his room.
NEWS
January 21, 2004
Grace W. Hastings, a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. operator, died of heart failure Thursday at Frederick Villa Nursing Center in Catonsville. She was 98. She was born and raised Grace Lemmon on her family's Lisbon farm. She was a graduate of Howard County public schools and went to work for C&P in 1928 as a switchboard operator. She retired in 1963. A longtime resident of Baker Avenue in Catonsville, she was married in 1932 to Clifton Hastings, a Baltimore Transit Co. streetcar motorman who died in 1975.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
John J. Diefenbach Jr., a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. draftsman who enjoyed sharing his affection and extensive knowledge of streetcars with visitors to the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of pneumonia Tuesday at St. Agnes HealthCare. The longtime Catonsville resident was 78. Mr. Diefenbach was born in Baltimore and reared on Arunah Avenue, the son of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad clerk. "His dad did a lot of traveling by train, and he'd take him along once in a while. The family also took vacations by train, so he grew up riding them and streetcars, which were his first love," said his wife of 53 years, the former Jane Dowling.
NEWS
April 21, 2013
An article in the April 19, 1913, edition of The Argus announced the return of familiar face on the rail cars . Not content with sitting on a slow-moving auto truck, Charles Bujac of Catonsville, one of the oldest motormen in the employ of the United Railways, is back again on the cars and will probably remain in that position for the rest of his active days. The lure of the old "Speeders" proved too strong for "Uncle Charlie," as he is known by all the men on the line, and so, to the great delight of his many co-laborers and friends, he may be seen traveling to and from Towson to Catonsville Junction on the back of a United States mail car. He is no longer guardian of the brakes which he so greatly loved, but rides on the back of the car in charge of the bell.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
J. Edward Naylor Sr., a retired Maryland Transit Administration employee who once had top seniority among his peers as a streetcar and bus operator, died of respiratory failure Nov. 29 at the Village of Harbor Point Assisted Living in Salisbury. The former Medfield-area resident was 95. Born in Upperco and raised in White Hall in Northern Baltimore County, he was the son of farmers Clearfield and Elsie Naylor. Family members said he attended Hereford High School and worked on neighboring farms as a young man. Mr. Naylor moved to Baltimore and took a job at the Greenspring Dairy in 1937.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | May 22, 2008
Oliver W. Green Sr., a former streetcar motorman who became the first African-American international secretary-treasurer of the Amalgamated Transit Union in Chevy Chase, died Sunday of complications after a stroke at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The longtime Northwood resident was 77. "Oliver Green was truly one of the great ATU international officers of the 20th century. His devotion to the causes of the transit worker and labor was unparalleled, and the kindness and compassion he showed in his service was appreciated by everyone he worked with, particularly International Headquarters," Warren S. George, international president of the ATU, said in a statement released yesterday "He was a trailblazer who fought for the rights of minorities in the labor movement."
NEWS
November 16, 2006
Grover C. Overcash, a retired MTA bus driver and former streetcar motorman, died of Alzheimer's disease Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 90. Mr. Overcash was born and raised in Mooresville, N.C. After graduating from high school in 1934, he worked in the highway and roads division of the North Carolina Department of Public Works. In 1942, he moved to Baltimore and took a job as a sheet metal worker at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River, building airplanes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
John J. Diefenbach Jr., a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. draftsman who enjoyed sharing his affection and extensive knowledge of streetcars with visitors to the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of pneumonia Tuesday at St. Agnes HealthCare. The longtime Catonsville resident was 78. Mr. Diefenbach was born in Baltimore and reared on Arunah Avenue, the son of a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad clerk. "His dad did a lot of traveling by train, and he'd take him along once in a while. The family also took vacations by train, so he grew up riding them and streetcars, which were his first love," said his wife of 53 years, the former Jane Dowling.
NEWS
January 21, 2004
Grace W. Hastings, a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. operator, died of heart failure Thursday at Frederick Villa Nursing Center in Catonsville. She was 98. She was born and raised Grace Lemmon on her family's Lisbon farm. She was a graduate of Howard County public schools and went to work for C&P in 1928 as a switchboard operator. She retired in 1963. A longtime resident of Baker Avenue in Catonsville, she was married in 1932 to Clifton Hastings, a Baltimore Transit Co. streetcar motorman who died in 1975.
NEWS
May 31, 1991
Stella Brannan, a retired member of the housekeeping staff at the main offices of the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., died Wednesday of heart failure at the Meridian-Catonsville Nursing Center.She was 88 and had been a Drew Street resident for many years.Services for Mrs. Brannan were being held today at the Charles S. Zeiler & Son Inc. funeral establishment, 6224 Eastern Ave.She retired about 30 years ago after working many years in BG&E's downtown offices. Before moving to Drew Street in the early 1940s, she had lived near Patterson Park, where she often provided snacks for neighborhood youths playing baseball and other sports in the park.
NEWS
April 21, 2013
An article in the April 19, 1913, edition of The Argus announced the return of familiar face on the rail cars . Not content with sitting on a slow-moving auto truck, Charles Bujac of Catonsville, one of the oldest motormen in the employ of the United Railways, is back again on the cars and will probably remain in that position for the rest of his active days. The lure of the old "Speeders" proved too strong for "Uncle Charlie," as he is known by all the men on the line, and so, to the great delight of his many co-laborers and friends, he may be seen traveling to and from Towson to Catonsville Junction on the back of a United States mail car. He is no longer guardian of the brakes which he so greatly loved, but rides on the back of the car in charge of the bell.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
If a rider needed to know what bus to take and where to catch it, John W. Linnemann Jr., a retired state Mass Transit Administration information services operator, had the answers."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service TC | May 12, 1993
NEW YORK -- Keron Thomas' obsession with subway trains did not begin in early childhood because in early childhood he was in Trinidad, and Trinidad does not have trains.But, oh, when he got to New York.He fell in love with the cruising, squealing monsters. Keron, 16, sometimes rode them just for fun. He hung around subway stations and learned the lingo of the motorman. He got his hands on the Transit Authority's book of rules and regulations and thumbed it until its cover was creased. He hung Transit Authority posters in his room.
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