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By Sarah Hainesworth, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Fabrics in pink, green, yellow and a black-and-purple Ravens pattern dance across the table as students at the Maryland School for the Blind create dog toys as part of a fundraiser that also teaches them motor skills. The school, which serves 185 blind and visually impaired students on its Parkville campus, has teamed with the Happy Hands, Happy Dogs fundraiser in which students make "Knots of Fun" toys for dogs and sell them on the campus. The proceeds benefit the school. "It's a project that can be done by all our students here at school," said Dareen Barrios, the school's assistant principal and career coordinator.
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NEWS
By Sarah Hainesworth, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Fabrics in pink, green, yellow and a black-and-purple Ravens pattern dance across the table as students at the Maryland School for the Blind create dog toys as part of a fundraiser that also teaches them motor skills. The school, which serves 185 blind and visually impaired students on its Parkville campus, has teamed with the Happy Hands, Happy Dogs fundraiser in which students make "Knots of Fun" toys for dogs and sell them on the campus. The proceeds benefit the school. "It's a project that can be done by all our students here at school," said Dareen Barrios, the school's assistant principal and career coordinator.
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NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | April 19, 1992
Bobbi Dull and Ricky Holwek have been selected bowlers of the month at Thunderhead Lanes in Taneytown.Dull lives in Westminster and bowls tenpins in the Friday Mixer League at Taneytown. She carries a 135 average and started her bowling career in 1984.The county government secretary throws an 11-pound, cranberry-colored bowling ball; her high game is 205 and her high set is 532.That 532 was the set that she threw in March for the 130-pins-over-average to become bowler of the month. Her three games were 186, 201 and145.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Diaz and Sam Diaz,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 2002
It's a parent's worst nightmare: A toddler with a milk bottle in one hand and a crayon in the other quietly sits down in front of a $1,500 computer and, in a matter of minutes, figures out how to short out the keyboard, draw whiskers on the mouse and erase the contents of the hard drive. It's an exaggerated scenario but one that many parents can't help but imagine as their child's interest in computers and technology grows. And it leads to the bigger question: What age is the most appropriate to expose a child to a computer and maybe buy one of her own?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Diaz and Sam Diaz,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 2002
It's a parent's worst nightmare: A toddler with a milk bottle in one hand and a crayon in the other quietly sits down in front of a $1,500 computer and, in a matter of minutes, figures out how to short out the keyboard, draw whiskers on the mouse and erase the contents of the hard drive. It's an exaggerated scenario but one that many parents can't help but imagine as their child's interest in computers and technology grows. And it leads to the bigger question: What age is the most appropriate to expose a child to a computer and maybe buy one of her own?
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2002
It is a preschooler's dream: a ball pit, bikes and an indoor playground. The Regional Early Childhood Center (RECC) at Bollman Bridge Elementary looks like a typical nursery classroom in many ways. The Jessup preschool has bulletin boards with calendars, vocabulary words and children's artwork. But equipment such as the swing hanging from the ceiling is there for more than just fun -- it is meant to help pupils work on their motor skills. RECC centers at 15 Howard County elementary schools are part of the Office of Early Intervention Services, a program of the county's public school system.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | May 17, 2001
IF YOU'RE looking for an inspirational story, it's hard to beat the one Marc DeSimone is living this spring. Two days from now, DeSimone will climb the stage at the Baltimore Arena with 770 other young men and women during Loyola College's commencement exercises. That he is only 19, and most of the other graduates 22, is remarkable in itself. Now add the fact he was diagnosed with ataxic cerebral palsy, and probable mental retardation, before he was 2. And that his parents were told by doctors to institutionalize him. And that his mother, a Ph.D.
NEWS
January 18, 2006
Earnest Hargett, Kenwood SPORT BASKETBALL BOYS STATS -- The Bluebirds won their first 10 games for the first time in school history, and Hargett, who stars as a point guard and guard, is a big reason why. Hargett, 5 feet 10, averaged 11.3 points and three assists during that span. His biggest game came in a victory over Perry Hall when he scored 20 of his 28 points in the first half, and had four steals and four assists. SIDELINES -- Hargett excels in the classroom. As part of his sports science academy, Hargett works with the elderly on their motor skills, as he takes them through a variety of calisthenics.
NEWS
December 27, 1990
The Anne Arundel County Department of Recreation and Parks' School-Aged Child Care program has openings throughout the county for children in grades one through six. After-school child care is provided through the Recreation and Parks Department in Severn elementary schools.The state-licensed child care programs provide a wide variety of activities which are supervised by certified staff. Children are involved in daily activity programs which include indoor and outdoor games, arts and crafts activities, special events, quiet/study time, individual and group activities and large/small motor skills activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | August 23, 2001
Kindermusik helps child's development Debbie Henning, the director of Kindermusik of Carroll County, will present a sneak peek into her music-education program's four levels at the Westminster Branch Library tomorrow. The program is based on a theory that music and movement help foster a child's intellectual, physical and social development. "There are a lot of studies done on early-childhood learning that show music helps prepare the brain for reading and math," says Henning, who's been teaching the Kindermusik way for 10 years.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2002
It is a preschooler's dream: a ball pit, bikes and an indoor playground. The Regional Early Childhood Center (RECC) at Bollman Bridge Elementary looks like a typical nursery classroom in many ways. The Jessup preschool has bulletin boards with calendars, vocabulary words and children's artwork. But equipment such as the swing hanging from the ceiling is there for more than just fun -- it is meant to help pupils work on their motor skills. RECC centers at 15 Howard County elementary schools are part of the Office of Early Intervention Services, a program of the county's public school system.
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | April 19, 1992
Bobbi Dull and Ricky Holwek have been selected bowlers of the month at Thunderhead Lanes in Taneytown.Dull lives in Westminster and bowls tenpins in the Friday Mixer League at Taneytown. She carries a 135 average and started her bowling career in 1984.The county government secretary throws an 11-pound, cranberry-colored bowling ball; her high game is 205 and her high set is 532.That 532 was the set that she threw in March for the 130-pins-over-average to become bowler of the month. Her three games were 186, 201 and145.
TRAVEL
May 9, 2010
Delaware Children's Museum Where: Riverfront Wilmington, 550 Justison St., Wilmington, Del. When: 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily What: The state's first and only museum dedicated to children, opened its doors April 24. The $11 million, 37,000-square-foot facility is located in the "Big Yellow Building" on the Christiana River. The museum features exhibits aimed at ages from toddlers to preteens. For example, the Stratosphere is a 30-foot-diameter climbing structure that allows children to reach a platform at the top that overlooks the museum lobby.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 29, 2012
Minority toddlers have more language, communication and gross motor skill delays than white toddlers, according to a new study from Kennedy Krieger Institute . Previous research concluded that children of African American, Hispanic and Asian descent with autism are not getting the same early diagnosis as while children. “We found the toddlers in the minority group were significantly further behind than the non-minority group in development of language and motor skills and showed more severe autism symptoms in their communication abilities,” said Dr. Rebecca Landa, director of the Center for Autism and Related Disorders at Kennedy Krieger Institute, in a statement.
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