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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
Jury selection and more pretrial motions are expected to take most – if not all – of Wednesday when the prosecution of Travers and Tremaine Johnson, twins charged with animal cruelty, resumes in a Baltimore courtroom. Much of Monday was taken up with motions on what evidence and testimony jurors will be allowed to consider. Baltimore City Circuit Court Judge Lawrence P. Fletcher-Hill ruled that a woman who identified the brothers to police can testify. In addition, prosecutors may use a statement by Travers Johnson to police as well as a city surveillance video.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Attorneys for a Baltimore police officer accused of slitting the throat of a shar-pei in June took the rare step Wednesday of writing an outside-the-court letter directly to Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein, asking him to drop the case. The attorneys for Officer Jeffrey Bolger argue the case was filed prematurely amid a storm of public criticism and a pre-investigatory rush to react by police and prosecutors, and that information uncovered since clears Bolger of wrongdoing.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
The criminal case against a Naval Academy midshipman accused of sexually assaulting a classmate is expected to move forward to a March 14 court-martial after a military judge denied two motions this week related to the case. Midshipman Joshua Tate is charged with aggravated sexual assault and making a false statement, in a high-profile case that stems from a 2012 off-campus party. The judge, Marine Col. Daniel Daugherty, denied two motions this week from Tate's lawyers, one seeking to bar some of Tate's statements from being used in court and another seeking to dismiss the case on the grounds that he has been selectively prosecuted.
SPORTS
By Cody Goodwin, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Connor Joyce stood inside the Ravens' team locker room on Thursday morning, smiling and taking pictures in front of a locker with his name on it. A wrestling singlet and baseball and soccer jerseys hung on display in that locker, representing the sports Joyce, a senior, played at Broadneck. Joyce and 12 other high-school student athletes were invited to M&T Bank Stadium for a luncheon in their honor on Thursday. The 13 prep stars - four of whom are from the Baltimore metropolitan area - were awarded Minds In Motion Scholarships by the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association and Allstate Foundation.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 30, 2003
Motions in the murder case of Ryan T. Furlough, the Centennial High School senior accused of fatally poisoning a classmate by spiking his soda with cyanide, were postponed yesterday after his lawyers said they are waiting for a psychological evaluation of their client. The evaluation will help attorneys decide whether an insanity plea is warranted, but it has been held up because the psychiatrist retained for the case has been in poor health, said Joseph Murtha, one of two attorneys representing Furlough.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1996
Anne Arundel County prosecutors rushed to file motions yesterday to prevent charges from being dismissed against 11 juveniles whose court dates were postponed because of this week's blizzard.Juvenile cases must be brought to court within 60 days of the citation by police, said Kristin Riggin, a spokeswoman for the county state's attorney. And the courthouse in Annapolis was closed Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday because of the storm, which dumped nearly 2 feet of snow on the region.The motions were filed to beat the 60-day deadline in cases ranging from drug violations to battery and disorderly conduct charges, she said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 30, 2003
Motions in the murder case of Ryan T. Furlough, the Centennial High School senior accused of fatally poisoning a classmate by spiking his soda with cyanide, were postponed yesterday after his lawyers said they are waiting for a psychological evaluation of their client. The evaluation will help attorneys decide whether an insanity plea is warranted, but it has been held up because the psychiatrist retained for the case has been in poor health, said Joseph Murtha, one of two attorneys representing Furlough.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- A Circuit Court judge is scheduled to hear motions tomorrow on evidence to be used in the trial of a 19-year-old Eldersburg man who has been behind bars for two months awaiting trial on attempted murder and drug charges.Gordon L. Cartnail has been jailed at the Carroll County Detention Center. He faces a life term in state prison.Cartnail faces more than 14 charges, including attempted murder and numerous drug offenses in connection with a December drive-by shooting.While out on bail in that case, he was arrested and charged with drug possession and distribution charges in March.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | November 8, 1999
It was not entirely clear from your review of the Microsoft Intellimouse Explorer whether it would be an improvement for people suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. Would an Intellimouse be easier on the wrists and fingers than a regular mouse?When asking me for medical advice, keep in mind that while I am more than eager to offer it, I am even less than a quack; I am a newspaper reporter posing as something I am not.That said, I believe this slick new laser-light-driven pointing device may be a boon to the hordes of computer users who have been injured by repeating the same motions over and over.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
In the days before state police investigators arrested Michael C. Bryson Sr. in the murder of Melrose hardware store owner Charles W. Therit, their search for the killer led to three dead ends.None of the dead ends led investigators anywhere near Mr. Bryson, who was arrested April 6 after a set of fingerprints found at the slaying scene was identified as his. Mr. Bryson was in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court yesterday, as his attorneys and prosecutors argued over more than 30 pretrial motions in the death penalty case.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Documents filed Friday in the University of Maryland's legal battle with the Atlantic Coast Conference show that subpoenas have been issued to at least 10 ACC schools - plus various broadcast media partners - seeking information about the ACC's $52 million exit fee and a number of other topics. In accompanying court filings, Maryland, which is contesting the exit fee as it prepares to join the Big Ten Conference in July, accuses the ACC of seeking to withhold information, along with more than $20 million in shared conference revenue.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
The criminal case against a Naval Academy midshipman accused of sexually assaulting a classmate is expected to move forward to a March 14 court-martial after a military judge denied two motions this week related to the case. Midshipman Joshua Tate is charged with aggravated sexual assault and making a false statement, in a high-profile case that stems from a 2012 off-campus party. The judge, Marine Col. Daniel Daugherty, denied two motions this week from Tate's lawyers, one seeking to bar some of Tate's statements from being used in court and another seeking to dismiss the case on the grounds that he has been selectively prosecuted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
A tiny water view painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir is finally headed back to the city where a judge has ruled that it belongs — 62 years, one month and 24 days after it was reported stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art . During a hearing Friday, Judge Leonie M. Brinkema of the U.S. District Court in Eastern Virginia granted the museum's request to throw out Marcia "Martha" Fuqua's ownership claim for the 1879 artwork, "Paysage Bords de...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 28, 2013
The 1970s corruption investigation known as Abscam, celebrated in "American Hustle," one of the holiday season's hottest movies, had its roots in Baltimore. It was in Charm City that the FBI tested the sting-style operation that marked Abscam as a particularly theatrical and effective form of undercover investigation. Baltimore FBI agents later trained those who carried out the Abscam sting. Abscam famously featured FBI agents posing as Arab sheiks, along with an accomplished con artist (played by Christian Bale in "American Hustle")
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, For The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Take 10 is a series of occasional features on prominent local residents and the possessions they treasure. Having - and sharing - adventures is the main theme in the life of Jim Seay, the 53-year-old president and owner of Premier Rides, a Baltimore-based company that makes theme park rides. The items he treasures most reflect that, whether it's one of his many past Super Bowl tickets or the photo commemorating the time he spent floating in zero gravity with famed physicist Stephen Hawking.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 30, 2013
A federal judge has denied - for now, at least - Blue Water Baltimor e's bid to intervene in the city's effort to delay its court-decreed deadline for fixing the pervasive sewage leaks that foul local streams and Baltimore's harbor. In a brief five-sentence ruling filed earlier this month, U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz declared "untimely" the environmental group's motion to participate in talks between city officials and federal and state regulators over the 2002 consent decree requiring Baltimore to fix its largest sewage overflows.  The city  has estimated it would spend $1 billion upgrading the sewer system by the deadline, 2016.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 30, 2001
Lawyers for a 43-year-old Dorsey man accused of killing his wife, who disappeared almost five years ago, withdrew motions in the case yesterday, saying they found no pretrial issues to argue in more than 7,000 pages of discovery. Paul Stephen Riggins is charged with the first-degree murder of his wife, Nancy Lee Riggins, whose body was never found. During a brief hearing in Howard County Circuit Court yesterday, defense attorney Joseph Murtha said there were no issues with the way tape recordings were done or the way two search warrants were executed in the case.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | August 13, 1991
When his lawyer told him that a jury had awarded him $690,000 in his case against two asbestos makers, Kenneth Perkins thought he might actually see that money. That was more than a year ago.Now he's not so sure. The $690,000 award, part of an $11 million settlementwith 10 shipyard workers, is still tied up after a year in post-trial motions in city Circuit Court.Once Judge John Carroll Byrnes rules on those motions, possibly in September, the defendants can begin an appeal of the case.Even if the award stands after the post-trial motions and the almost-inevitable appeal, Perkins, who turned 78 yesterday, will face the onerous task of actually getting the money from the Manville Corp.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
The Baltimore County police union is asking a judge to hold in contempt County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and his budget director, arguing that the county has not complied with an order to return money to hundreds of retirees who overpaid health care premiums. The petition comes more than a month after a Baltimore County circuit judge ordered the repayment of nearly $573,000, plus interest, to more than 400 retirees. The payment was supposed to have been issued within 20 days, but the county is challenging the decision and has not paid.
FEATURES
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
An environmental advocacy group filed legal action against the city of Baltimore Wednesday, alleging that the city has not complied with a 2002 agreement to lessen sewage outflows that pollute area waterways. The group Blue Water Baltimore filed a motion in federal court to join an existing federal enforcement action that required the city to take a number of steps to address alleged violations of the Clean Water Act. In the motion, the group claims federal authorities "failed to adequately enforce" the water cleanup agreement, called a consent decree, they and the city reached in 2002.
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