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Motion Sickness

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NEWS
September 28, 2012
  What can I do to prevent my dog from getting carsick? She is fine for a short trip, but after 20 minutes, she gets sick. Motion sickness is one of the undertreated problems that we see in pets. This can make a road trip a nightmare for the pets and their companions. Before trying to fix the problem, it is important to figure out what's making them to throw up in the car. Two main reasons for this are fear of the car ride and true motion sickness. The first is especially common in younger pets or newly adopted pets that have not had a lot experience in cars.
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NEWS
September 28, 2012
  What can I do to prevent my dog from getting carsick? She is fine for a short trip, but after 20 minutes, she gets sick. Motion sickness is one of the undertreated problems that we see in pets. This can make a road trip a nightmare for the pets and their companions. Before trying to fix the problem, it is important to figure out what's making them to throw up in the car. Two main reasons for this are fear of the car ride and true motion sickness. The first is especially common in younger pets or newly adopted pets that have not had a lot experience in cars.
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FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | June 25, 1991
AS NURSE, chef and purser aboard a 160-foot motor yacht called the Michaela Rose, Sheila Moore knows about motion sickness. In one particularly brutal North Atlantic storm, she recalls, a crewman from the Philippines threatened to jump overboard and swim home to escape the cold sweats, nausea and retching that gripped him. During another rough stretch along the coast of Morocco, Moore prepared a sumptuous shipboard Thanksgiving dinner for 10, only to...
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 13, 2010
I don't really like boats, so don't surprise me with one, unless the surprise you're looking for is "Oh, wow! Just what I never wanted!" I think it's because I have always suffered from motion sickness. Even as a child riding the Fire Island ferry during the summer — a brief trek across the Great South Bay that more resembles a water-taxi route than a sea journey — I would race to claim a seat in the open area up top, away from the strong smell of fuel that increased my discomfort with the tilting of the horizon.
FEATURES
By Sheridan Warrick and Sheridan Warrick,Excerpted from In Health magazine | April 23, 1991
For a time in 1947, the Baltimore woman's life seemed just about unbearable. She was pregnant, which was trouble enough. But then her skin broke out with itchy, swollen red patches -- hives, she called it. Allergic "urticaria" in her doctor's words. She sought treatment at Johns Hopkins Hospital. A trip there, however, meant a trolley ride, and that meant even more punishment. All her life, any travel had brought on waves of motion sickness.At Johns Hopkins, luck ran her way. The allergy clinic had just begun tests of a new antihistamine dubbed "Compound 1694."
FEATURES
By Rick Weiss and Rick Weiss,New York Times News Service | April 29, 1992
It can happen in the back seat of an automobile or in the first class cabin of a trans-Atlantic flight. Wherever it strikes, an estimated 90 percent of American adults at some point in their lives meet that bane of travel: motion sickness.For the 10 million to 15 million adults who encounter it regularly when they travel, dream vacations turn into nightmares. And the syndrome's debilitating symptoms are a constant threat to pilots, Navy crews and astronauts.But now help is on the horizon.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Elaine Tassy and Diana K. Sugg and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
Physicians are blaming one ingredient in a street drug cocktail for side effects that have sent dozens to hospitals and killed three people in Baltimore.The ingredient, scopolamine, is used in small amounts to treat motion sickness. But it has shown up in concentrations hundreds to thousands of times stronger in the capsules being sold as heroin, said Dr. Richard Zane, chief resident of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital.High doses of the prescription drug can cause vivid, terrifying hallucinations, convulsions and lethal heart arrhythmias.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
OVER THE GULF OF MEXICO - Four turbojet engines howl as the KC-135 rockets upward into a clear blue sky 200 miles south of Houston. In the heavily padded cabin of the former aerial tanker, Michael Sharma braces himself for an experience that few earthlings will ever share - weightlessness. Is he excited? Proud? Jittery? "Queasy," groans the Johns Hopkins University junior as the blood drains from his face. Such is the human cost of conducting research in one of the world's most unusual laboratories - and exclusive thrill rides.
NEWS
By Darryl E. Owens and Darryl E. Owens,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 29, 2001
You finally book your dream cruise to that tropical Eden with the sugar-sand beaches and azure waters as intoxicating as the rum-spiked drinks served at the bar. You can see it now: You're standing tall at the bow, cocktail in hand, sultry trade winds kissing your face, and you marvel at the undulating waters. You're the king of the world! Too often, however, the gut-wrenching reality of motion sickness intrudes on that dream sequence. For some 50 million Americans, motion sickness is the killjoy that threatens to turn a dream vacation into a gastrointestinal nightmare.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 13, 2010
I don't really like boats, so don't surprise me with one, unless the surprise you're looking for is "Oh, wow! Just what I never wanted!" I think it's because I have always suffered from motion sickness. Even as a child riding the Fire Island ferry during the summer — a brief trek across the Great South Bay that more resembles a water-taxi route than a sea journey — I would race to claim a seat in the open area up top, away from the strong smell of fuel that increased my discomfort with the tilting of the horizon.
TRAVEL
By Hugo Martin and Hugo Martin,Los Angeles Times | February 8, 2009
At some point, almost every traveler experiences seasickness or some other form of motion sickness. Mal de mer, as the French call it, is so common on cruise ships that some lines dispense anti-nausea pills free of charge. Remember, your vulnerability to seasickness is not a reflection of your fortitude or machismo. Even actor George Clooney was stricken during the filming of the seafaring saga The Perfect Storm. Doctors think motion sickness stems from conflicting signals from your brain and body.
FEATURES
By HOLLY SELBY | November 22, 2007
For many Americans, the holiday season begins today with a journey -- perhaps in a car crammed with pies, kids and the family dog or on an overbooked flight. Unfortunately, for some, the trip to Grandma's or Uncle Joe's or sister Sue's may be marred by motion sickness. About one-third of the general population may be affected by motion sickness on a regular basis, says Dr. Russell Wright, otolaryngologist and president of the medical staff at St. Joseph Medical Center. Though motion sickness is not considered medically serious, if you are the one suffering from the condition, it can feel serious indeed.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | March 2, 2007
I recently had dinner at a friend's home. After dinner, my friend put the dishes on the floor for the dog to lick. Needless to say, I was horrified. My friend does not have a dishwasher and washes dishes by hand. Now I do not want to eat there again unless I bring my own dishes. Can humans get germs from dogs this way? (I have a suppressed immune system.) How would you handle this situation and still keep your friend? Dogs can harbor germs such as Bordetella bronchiseptica (kennel cough)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur and Ann McArthur,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2005
After the kazoo wah wah wahs the national anthem, all the vehicles' brakes are tested, and contestants get their feet blessed by a monk, a man in a top hat wearing overalls and a cape will make a speech and sound a bullhorn signaling the start of the American Visionary Art Museum's seventh annual Kinetic Sculpture Race on Saturday. This is not your typical 15-mile dash. At least 20 human-propelled creations will creep at about 4 mph through water, sand and mud to vie for the top prize - which, as it turns out, is for the finisher not at the top, but smack-dab in the middle - in this event billed as a collision of art and engineering.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
OVER THE GULF OF MEXICO - Four turbojet engines howl as the KC-135 rockets upward into a clear blue sky 200 miles south of Houston. In the heavily padded cabin of the former aerial tanker, Michael Sharma braces himself for an experience that few earthlings will ever share - weightlessness. Is he excited? Proud? Jittery? "Queasy," groans the Johns Hopkins University junior as the blood drains from his face. Such is the human cost of conducting research in one of the world's most unusual laboratories - and exclusive thrill rides.
NEWS
By Darryl E. Owens and Darryl E. Owens,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 29, 2001
You finally book your dream cruise to that tropical Eden with the sugar-sand beaches and azure waters as intoxicating as the rum-spiked drinks served at the bar. You can see it now: You're standing tall at the bow, cocktail in hand, sultry trade winds kissing your face, and you marvel at the undulating waters. You're the king of the world! Too often, however, the gut-wrenching reality of motion sickness intrudes on that dream sequence. For some 50 million Americans, motion sickness is the killjoy that threatens to turn a dream vacation into a gastrointestinal nightmare.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | November 18, 1997
I recently wrenched my back, but I can't take anti-inflammatory medicines. An advertisement for a painkiller that contains no drugs or narcotics caught my eye. They say it is as effective as morphine and contains phenylalanine. It sounds like a miracle, but is it really safe and effective?An amino acid, d-phenylalanine, has been shown to relieve acute back pain and might be worth a try for you. It interferes with an enzyme that breaks down the brain's natural pain relievers. Expecting it to work as well as morphine could set you up for disappointment, though.
TRAVEL
December 19, 1999
Skiing reports just seconds awayFew things equal the intensity of anticipation as you head off a for a schussing good time on your ski getaway -- except maybe the strength of the disappointment in getting there and finding mud puddles instead of a carpet of white. Avoid chance by checking out the weather before you head out.Yahoo researches ski conditions around the world, printing a searchable master list on its skiing-headquarters Web site: snow. yahoo.com. Here you can read up on the latest equipment and link to sellers, or check out conditions from Vermont to New Zealand.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 1998
My wife and I tried your golden raisins and gin for arthritis and we were unimpressed. We have discovered something else, though.Take two teaspoons of Certo dissolved in three ounces of grape juice. Do this three times a day. We have been told to cut back to one teaspoon of Certo in grape juice twice a day after the joints quit aching.We buy Certo in the grocery store near the canning jars. It's simple and cheap and seems to be helping.I am on Coumadin so I can't take anti-inflammatory drugs like Advil or Aleve.
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