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NEWS
May 18, 2008
SANDY HOWARD, 80 Film and TV producer Sandy Howard, a film and television producer whose credits include The Island of Dr. Moreau and the 1970s Western A Man Called Horse, died Friday at the Motion Picture and Television Fund's hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif., of complications from Alzheimer's disease, spokeswoman Jaime Larkin told the Associated Press. Mr. Howard had been a resident of the hospital's Alzheimer's and Dementia Care Facility, Harry's Haven, for 10 years. Born in the Bronx, N.Y., Mr. Howard started his career as a publicist for Broadway shows before directing TV's Howdy Doody at age 19, according to the Motion Picture and Television Fund.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
Julia Louis-Dreyfus won a top SAG Award Saturday night for her work in Baltimore-made "Veep. " TV's all-time leader in comedy Emmys was honored for outstanding performance by a female actor in a comedy series by the Screen Actors Guild for her portrayal as Vice President Selina Meyer in the HBO political satire. Other TV winners Saturday were AMC's "Breaking Bad" for outstanding ensemble performance in a drama, and the series' star, Bryan Cranston, for outstanding performance by a male actor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 8, 1999
'The Matrix'Music from the Motion Picture (Maverick 47390)It used to be that sci-fi soundtracks emphasized music that was eerie and otherworldly, evoking the mysteries of outer space with moans and all sorts of atonal creepiness.Not anymore. Today's S.F. films believe that techno music is the sound of the future -- particularly if the action takes place not in outer space but cyberspace. Rock and roll may be great for evoking the sweaty exuberance of flesh-and-blood heroes, but it takes the cool, clockwork precision of techno's synths and sequencers to convey the cold, electronic world of computer logic.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 28, 2013
The 1970s corruption investigation known as Abscam, celebrated in "American Hustle," one of the holiday season's hottest movies, had its roots in Baltimore. It was in Charm City that the FBI tested the sting-style operation that marked Abscam as a particularly theatrical and effective form of undercover investigation. Baltimore FBI agents later trained those who carried out the Abscam sting. Abscam famously featured FBI agents posing as Arab sheiks, along with an accomplished con artist (played by Christian Bale in "American Hustle")
NEWS
December 16, 2005
Seeking to stop the illegal distribution of its movies over the Internet, Disney Enterprises filed a copyright infringement lawsuit yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against a Beltsville man who is accused of illegally swapping films online. The suit alleges that Wajahat Saleem downloaded a copy of The Incredibles and used an online media distribution system to make the movie available to others. Efforts to reach Saleem for comment yesterday were unsuccessful. The court filing is part of a broader campaign by the Motion Picture Association of America to fight film piracy and raise awareness about the consequences of illegal file-swapping.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 9, 1995
Not being one to be scared away by anything as piddling as a major motion picture (especially one that died a quick death), Fell's Point Corner Theatre is presenting Phyllis Nagy's theatrical adaptation of Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter," beginning tomorrow. Barry Feinstein directs a cast headed by Mary Anne Perry as Hester Prynne.Show times at Fell's Point Corner, 251 S. Ann St., are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, with matinees at 2 p.m. Sundays, through Dec. 17. Tickets are $10 and $11. Call (410)
NEWS
December 13, 1993
It was appropriate for Attorney General Janet Reno to suggest recently that unless TV executives exercised a reasonable degree of self-restraint in depicting violence the government might be forced to step in. Ms. Reno implied that television should follow the example of the motion picture industry, which voluntarily adopted standards for rating the sex and violence content of films.So far, so good. But the movie industry may not always be the model of "reasonableness." While Hollywood generally has adhered to the standards it set for itself in the 1970s, the ratings can cover a multitude of sins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2003
With major media fanfare, Hollywood studios have announced a big advertising campaign designed to curb film piracy. But behind the scenes, studio executives are wondering how much their own Oscar campaigns - in which thousands of "for your consideration" DVDs are mailed to voters and opinion-makers - are feeding the lucrative underground market. While Academy Awards season is still months away - and not even on the radar screen of the general public - the Motion Picture Association of America is in talks with the seven major studios on how to minimize the potential harm caused by Oscar mailers, known in the industry as "academy screeners."
NEWS
September 28, 1990
It was 22 years ago that the motion picture industry adopted a rating system to set standards for films shown in mainstream theaters. The ratings -- "G," "PG," "R" and "X" -- were intended to guide viewers in their selection of films and represented a kind of voluntary self-censorship on the part of an industry alarmed by calls for government restrictions on the portrayal of sex and violence in the movies.The system generally has worked well -- except in regard to the "X" rating, originally intended to designate material suitable for adults only.
NEWS
January 24, 2003
Linda Goldenberg, a motion picture marketing and publicity executive and former Baltimore resident, died of cancer Monday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif. She was 57. Mrs. Goldenberg, a Los Angeles resident, had been president of marketing for the Premiere Marketing and Distribution Group there since 2001. Born Linda Schwartz in Philadelphia and raised in Baltimore, she was a 1959 graduate of Forest Park High School. She began her career as a secretary for Jack Fruchtman Sr., owner of JF Theaters, one of the largest movie chains in Maryland.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2013
After Maryland was included Sunday in the newly released AP Top 25 -- just making it in, at No. 25 -- it was more than fair to ask: when was the last time the Terps were actually ranked in the poll during the season? The team was voted No. 23 in the final AP Top 25 of the 2010 season, a nice parting gift for the outgoing Ralph Friedgen and the Military Bowl champion Terps . But to find their last regular-season appearance, you have to go back even further: Nov. 16, 2008 . It was a short-lived distinction.
NEWS
May 18, 2008
SANDY HOWARD, 80 Film and TV producer Sandy Howard, a film and television producer whose credits include The Island of Dr. Moreau and the 1970s Western A Man Called Horse, died Friday at the Motion Picture and Television Fund's hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif., of complications from Alzheimer's disease, spokeswoman Jaime Larkin told the Associated Press. Mr. Howard had been a resident of the hospital's Alzheimer's and Dementia Care Facility, Harry's Haven, for 10 years. Born in the Bronx, N.Y., Mr. Howard started his career as a publicist for Broadway shows before directing TV's Howdy Doody at age 19, according to the Motion Picture and Television Fund.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | January 27, 2008
Barry Louis Polisar and his family settled into their seats at a Bethesda movie theater as the overhead lights dimmed and the stream of movie previews gave way to soft-drink slurps and the munching of buttered popcorn, just before the movie's opening number. "You should tell them you wrote the song," said his wife, Roni. "Maybe they'll give us free tickets." "Shhhh!" said the couple's 20-something twins, Evan and Sierra, perhaps recognizing their father's urge to be incognito. He worried about how his 1977 song "All I Want Is You" would be featured in the then-newly released motion picture, Juno - and whether more than 30 years as a children's author and entertainer would be tarnished by a momentary mocking of his work on the big screen.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | December 20, 2006
Christopher Saah's atmospheric photographs of Hollywood at night, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, clearly are inspired by the luxuriantly decadent cinematography of film directors such as David Lynch and Quentin Tarantino. Saah's Hollywood, with its aura of sex and violence, pays homage to the B-movie version of Hollywood in most people's minds. But it hardly resembles the glamorous movie capital fans imagine when they think of the home of the stars. That Hollywood, if it ever existed, is long gone, having been replaced by a gritty, somewhat tattered urban environment that's a mere ghost of its storied past.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 29, 2006
We established loyalties during the childhood Saturdays spent at the neighborhood and downtown movie houses. My own allegiances went to the Waverly, Boulevard, Parkway and Aurora, all still standing, but all out of the motion picture business. I miss them all and the sense they imparted of a neighborhood coming out for a good time. I am indebted to author Robert K. Headley, who in his comprehensive tribute to Baltimore's theaters, Motion Picture Exhibition in Baltimore, An Illustrated History and Directory of Theaters, 1895-2004, takes us from the Alpha (Catonsville)
NEWS
December 16, 2005
Seeking to stop the illegal distribution of its movies over the Internet, Disney Enterprises filed a copyright infringement lawsuit yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against a Beltsville man who is accused of illegally swapping films online. The suit alleges that Wajahat Saleem downloaded a copy of The Incredibles and used an online media distribution system to make the movie available to others. Efforts to reach Saleem for comment yesterday were unsuccessful. The court filing is part of a broader campaign by the Motion Picture Association of America to fight film piracy and raise awareness about the consequences of illegal file-swapping.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | June 13, 1996
The Cable GuyOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (Work 67654)Because the track listing includes bits of dialogue and an actual song performed by Jim Carrey, it may look as if the soundtrack to "The Cable Guy" offers more comedy than music. Guess again. From the growling guitars of Jerry Cantrell's "Leave Me Alone" to the grinding synths of Filter's "Hey Man Nice Shot," the songs on this soundtrack are far more interested in exploring the dark than in making light. Given the talent involved, though, that shouldn't come as a surprise.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 30, 1992
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- The military courtroom drama "A Few Good Men," starring Tom Cruise and Jack Nicholson, led in nominations for the 50th annual Golden Globe Awards, announced yesterday. The Rob Reiner-directed film received nods in five key categories, including best dramatic motion picture, actor, supporting actor, director and screenwriter.Walt Disney Pictures' animated feature "Aladdin" also received five nominations -- best motion picture comedy or musical category and four for its critically praised song score.
NEWS
By RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ AND MARY MCNAMARA and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ AND MARY MCNAMARA,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2005
As it attempts to halt the year's box office slide, Hollywood is bringing out the Howitzer for the holidays -- the turbocharged children's film. For the last five years, PG-13 has ruled the box office; it's the imprimatur of the top-grossing films of the year. Now kids' films, PG-rated and amped up with computer graphics, are trying to catch up. The gentle fantasy of C.S. Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, with its snowy landscapes and talking animals, gives way to a fight-to-the-death battle between loyal Narnians and the ghoul-filled army of the White Witch.
BUSINESS
By Lorenza Munoz and Jon Healey and Lorenza Munoz and Jon Healey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 13, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - One year after the Motion Picture Association of America began its highly publicized campaign against pre-Oscar piracy, the problem is even worse. There are significantly more Academy Award screeners - copies of films - available on the Internet for downloading than there were last year, according to Web sites that track online piracy, including all five films nominated for best picture. And because the Academy Award screeners are DVDs - not VHS videos, as they were last season - the quality of the copies is much better.
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