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By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2011
Moths have ruined all the wool clothes in my closet. They aren't the kind that fly around lights at night. They're tiny, and sometimes I only see larvae. I used a trap, which killed some. I also tried cedar balls, blocks and hangers. I bought a bomb, too, but it's so toxic I'm afraid to use it. I saw a commercial for something that plugs into an outlet and sends out a frequency to drive them away. What should I do next? Using mothballs and cedar are preventive measures against clothes moths.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
The eggs of a destructive foreign moth species that "poses a significant threat to our nation's forests and urban landscapes" were found aboard a carrier ship docked in Baltimore in mid-September, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said Monday. Customs agents discovered six masses of Asian Gypsy Moth eggs during a Sept. 16 inspection of the Columbia Highway, a vehicle carrier that had made port calls in Japan in June and July, the border agency said. Females of the species can travel 25 miles per day and "can lay egg masses that could yield hundreds of hungry caterpillars," the agency said.
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NEWS
May 3, 1992
Because of threats of rain last week, Aberdeen Proving Ground postponed aerial spraying for gypsy moths until today.The spraying will be conducted from 6 to 11 a.m., and will be repeated in five to 10 days.Residents are advised to stay indoors during the spraying, though the insecticide, called Bt, is not harmful to humans, scientists say. Cars and other automobiles should be washed after the spraying, to prevent color-spotting.About 3,000 acres of woodland at APG will be treated to prevent the voracious moths from defoliating trees, said APG officials.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2011
Moths have ruined all the wool clothes in my closet. They aren't the kind that fly around lights at night. They're tiny, and sometimes I only see larvae. I used a trap, which killed some. I also tried cedar balls, blocks and hangers. I bought a bomb, too, but it's so toxic I'm afraid to use it. I saw a commercial for something that plugs into an outlet and sends out a frequency to drive them away. What should I do next? Using mothballs and cedar are preventive measures against clothes moths.
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | January 6, 2007
Moths are flying in my house, and I'm worried about my woolens and rugs. How do I get rid of them? They're probably not clothes moths, which are tiny and rarely glimpsed. Indian meal moths, however, are common year-round. This pantry pest has a faint dark band across its dusty wings. It originates in pasta, spices, cereals and -- take note this time of year -- bird seed, among other sources. Call us or read our online publication, Pantry Pests, for simple measures you can follow to eradicate the moths.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1995
The weather warms. The eggs hatch. The creatures stir.They crawl up the trunks of oak trees to dine, and millions of dollars worth of Maryland hardwood starts to die.Bob Tichenor has the job of controlling the voracious leaf-eaters, which fatally weaken trees by defoliating them.It's man against gypsy moth.The annual struggle is set to begin. Thousands of state residents already have received letters alerting them to the coming bombing runs on bugs, by helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft flying 50 feet above the treetops.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2005
We have moths flying from the kitchen and little worms on the walls. We threw out all the dry goods, and cleaned and sprayed the cabinets with insecticide. Do these moths get into fabric? Your visitors are Indian meal moths and their larvae, common pantry pests. They eat grain products, dried fruit, nuts, spices, even dried flower arrangements, and love birdseed and dog food. They do not feed on clothing. Empty your food storage areas, vacuum all cracks and crevices, and wash with soapy water.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
Maryland's spraying program to control gypsy moths begins at dawn tomorrow despite concern about the long-range environmental impact of one insecticide used by the state to control the tree-killing insects.A three-year field study of the chemical Dimilin raises questions about wildlife safety in hardwood forests where that substance is sprayed, say West Virginia University scientists who participated in the $1 million federally funded project near Parsons, W.Va.Among their findings:* Though targeted for gypsy moths, Dimilin wipes out other creatures, including benign types of caterpillars, spiders and sawflies, some of which take years to recover.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | January 26, 2008
Are gypsy moths coming back? I didn't see any on my oaks last year. Gypsy moths never leave entirely, but their numbers were knocked down for years by a beneficial fungal disease, plus aerial spray programs. The fungus is not effective in dry weather, and last year we had a dry spring. Many parts of Maryland were hit hard with gypsy moth defoliation. If we have a dry spring this year, expect a huge increase in gypsy moths. To prepare, scout your property this winter for their tan felt-like 1 1/2 -inch egg masses.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk | May 3, 1991
Sleepyheads were awakened to the sounds of whirling blades this week, as the state began its aerial assault against the gypsy moth.Like a scene out of "Rambo" or highlights from the Desert Storm video, a helicopter crisscrossed Pasadena neighborhoods, spraying the treetops.I'm not really sure exactly how this bug juice works. It's not that I don't care. After spending last summer scraping caterpillars from tree trunks and listening to their munching, anything that will kill the little critters is fine with me.*The baseball season isalready in full swing, but that will not make a difference to the 200 youngsters getting ready to march in the annual Fort Smallwood Optimists Little League parade May 11.Marchers will assemble at VFW Post 2462, 1720 Bayside Beach Road, step off at 9 a.m. and proceed to Cory Park, adjacent to Fort Smallwood Elementary.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | October 5, 2008
Based on preliminary information from pest management officials with the state Department of Agriculture, the shade trees in your yard are less likely to fall victim to voracious caterpillars next year than in the recent past. The state reports that a naturally occurring fungus caused by wet spring weather, along with the Agriculture Department's effective suppression program, has resulted in a decline in gypsy moth defoliation this fall as compared with last year. State officials also expect less of an attack by the leaf-eating caterpillars next year.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | May 10, 2008
Maryland is doubling its effort to kill gypsy moths, an invasive Eurasian pest that defoliated tens of thousands of acres of trees across the state last year. Airplanes are spraying pesticides on about 100,000 acres of trees in Baltimore County, Western Maryland and elsewhere. It's a $4 million project that state officials hope will beat back an egg-laying spree last year by the leaf-munching menaces. "There are a lot of gypsy moths out there, and we are trying to suppress them so people don't have to deal with them in their parks or homes," said Steve Tilley, an entomologist at the Maryland Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Laura Smitherman and Bradley Olson and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporters | April 6, 2008
The General Assembly passed Maryland's $31.2 billion budget yesterday, capping a hectic day of debates and votes as lawmakers sought to put the finishing touches on a crush of legislation before they adjourn tomorrow. Although much of the day was taken up with debate over the repeal of the computer services tax, both legislative chambers sent bills to Gov. Martin O'Malley for his signature, including high-profile measures that would protect rural shoreline from further development and strengthen penalties against manufacturers of toys and other products containing lead.
NEWS
March 27, 2008
April showers not only bring May flowers, but they also can reduce the outbreak of gypsy moths. The winged invaders are on the upswing, and unless there's a wet spring to help spread a naturally occurring virus that attacks the moths at the caterpillar stage, state officials expect to spray about four times as much land with pesticide than they did just two years ago. Gov. Martin O'Malley has asked the legislature to approve $3.5 million so the Maryland...
NEWS
By Karen Heller | January 30, 2008
How, precisely, to dress for a recession? Modestly, resourcefully, with an eye toward vintage. Moth-eaten sweaters will stage a comeback. Holes are huge. Worn shoes, too. Hand-me-downs, share-arounds, what-was-I-thinking and if-it-still-fits-wear-it will out-Vogue Vogue. The old-money look will be the epitome of style - without, understandably, the money part. Slippers are a sound purchase, unlike stocks, as many Americans won't be traveling anywhere with their farcical dollars. We will be spending much, much more time at home, with the heat turned way, way down.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | January 26, 2008
Are gypsy moths coming back? I didn't see any on my oaks last year. Gypsy moths never leave entirely, but their numbers were knocked down for years by a beneficial fungal disease, plus aerial spray programs. The fungus is not effective in dry weather, and last year we had a dry spring. Many parts of Maryland were hit hard with gypsy moth defoliation. If we have a dry spring this year, expect a huge increase in gypsy moths. To prepare, scout your property this winter for their tan felt-like 1 1/2 -inch egg masses.
NEWS
March 27, 2008
April showers not only bring May flowers, but they also can reduce the outbreak of gypsy moths. The winged invaders are on the upswing, and unless there's a wet spring to help spread a naturally occurring virus that attacks the moths at the caterpillar stage, state officials expect to spray about four times as much land with pesticide than they did just two years ago. Gov. Martin O'Malley has asked the legislature to approve $3.5 million so the Maryland...
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | March 31, 1991
Fewer gypsy moths are expected to chew on fewer Carroll tree leaves this year than last, a state pest expert said.The state will spray about 1,400 fewer acres to suppress the insect in the county than it did last year, said Robert H. Tichenor Jr., chief of the Forest Pest Management Section of the Department of Agriculture.Surveys done last fall found fewer egg masses were laid in the county than last year, meaning the potential for damage is less this year, he said.The acreage sprayed will be in the southeast corner of the county, and about half the area will be in Patapsco State Park,said Betsie M. Handley, regional entomologist for the state in MountAiry.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | December 15, 2007
The lower leaves of my new Encore azalea are turning brownish. Is this variety partly deciduous, or do I have a disease problem? The plant was healthy all spring and summer and bloomed well. Healthy evergreen azaleas often exhibit color change in fall and winter. Depending on variety and site conditions, colors range from purple-reds to yellow-greens. They can be quite attractive in the winter landscape. Azaleas normally drop a few leaves in the fall, but the majority remain and green up in plenty of time for spring floral displays.
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