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May 10, 2010
While I totally respect Chris Bolgiano's right to decide "not to be" ("An overpopulated, over-consuming world needs people willing not to procreate", May 9) and truly admire her global motivation, as for me, I would rather see (and the world would surely need) a child created and nurtured by someone so intelligent and talented as she is, than 10 children born to others who are not. Marge Mitchell, Cub Hill
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck and The Schmuck Stops Here | October 13, 2014
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Don't let all the predictable denials fool you. The steady rain that postponed Game 3 of the American League Championship Series was just what the doctor ordered for an Orioles team that could use a little celestial intervention to cool off the sizzling Kansas City Royals. Who cares if it was a doctor of meteorology? The Royals have won six straight postseason games and seven straight overall dating back to the last day of the regular season, so anything that interrupts their biorhythms should be more than OK with the Orioles.
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FEATURES
By Gregory Lewis and Gregory Lewis,San Francisco Examiner | February 11, 1994
"Your mother is so ugly," said Alonzo "Hamburger" Longhorn on a recent Uptown Comedy Club TV show, "when she moved into her new apartment, the neighbors chipped in to buy her curtains."The lowdown, funky, nasty Dirty Dozens is back in vogue.The dozens is a game of verbal combat, played mostly by black males on street corners. It is designed to teach participants to maintain control and keep cool under adverse circumstances."We played the dozens for recreation, like white folks play Scrabble," H. Rap Brown once said.
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Montgomery County police investigators suspect a Clarksburg mother killed two young children who have been missing for more than a week, police said on Monday. Sarah Hoggle, 3, and Jacob Hoggle, 2, have been missing since Sept. 8. Authorities are investigating their mother, Catherine Hoggle, 27, in their possible deaths. Hoggle had also gone missing for a few days after her common-law husband became suspicious about the kids' whereabouts. "We keep a ray of hope that Sarah and Jacob will be reunited with their family," Police Capt.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
I'm not going to lie: Mother's Day has taken me by surprise this year. Maybe it's all the hoopla of returning to the office this week after maternity leave and getting this blog launched, but I'm definitely not ready. For the moms in my life, I'm sorry: Your presents have been ordered, but they won't be delivered in time for me to get them to you on Sunday. But you have my unending gratitude for all your love and support, especially through the challenges of the past year. And readers, thankfully, my colleagues have you covered.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 25, 2013
Moms are feeding their babies solid foods before their bodies are developed enough to handle it, a new study by the Centers For Disease Control has found. The American Academy of Pediatrics has long advised that babies don't get solid food until they are four to six months-old. But 40 percent of the nearly 1,300 mothers surveyed in the study said they introduced food before that. Babies are better developed at 4 to 6 months of age, including having the ability to hold their heads up and open their mouths for food.
NEWS
April 16, 2012
I have just one comment on the unfortunate Hillary Rosen's remarks concerning Ann Romney ("Strategist's Ann Romney remarks touch off a storm," April 13). Women who choose to stay at home not only raise their children and run their households are usually a strong supporter of their spouse, the wage earner. They continue to be aware of social and economic issues while working as homemakers. Many have given up careers, some permanently, but they do not stop learning, and they continue to be assets in our society.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | January 19, 2011
Unless you've been stuck in the house with sick kids or trapped there by snow, ice and school closings, you've probably heard about author Amy Chua and her memoir of raising two daughters in the Chinese way, with threats, taunts and unrelenting discipline. The book by the Yale Law School professor, titled "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother," has had the not-so-surprising effect of bringing down more anger and abuse on Chua than she ever visited on daughters Sophia and Louisa. And it awoke the dragon of the Mommy Wars from the cave where it had been sleeping since supermodel mother Gisele Bündchen was quoted saying breast-feeding should be mandatory.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
When Jim Bartlett last left the Mothers' Garden in Clifton Park on Friday evening, there were two short stone columns standing at the entrance from East 32nd Street, but no longer. By Saturday morning, when he arrived to prepare for a Mother's Day weekend celebration, one of the columns lay on its side, the apparent victim of an overnight car accident. The pile of fallen stone made as a good an illustration as any of why Bartlett was there at all, why he has devoted so much time in the past few months to creating an organization devoted exclusively to maintaining this enclave of stone paths, stone gazebo, arbor, footbridge, benches and landscaping that was established in 1926 to honor mothers.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Every working breastfeeding mother has had it happen at least once: You're on a break, ready to pump, when you discover you forgot a crucial piece of equipment.  Maybe it's a valve, a piece of tubing or a storage bag. You find yourself wondering if you can store milk in a water bottle or use butter as a nipple cream because there's no time to run home.  What can you do? Workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital can now purchase breastfeeding equipment from a vending machine -- believed to be the first of its kind.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Martin Weil and The Washington Post | September 13, 2014
Montgomery County police continue to speak with Catherine Hoggle, the 27-year-old woman who had been missing for days along with two of her children, but the children have not been located. “Catherine Hoggle remains in police custody while detectives continue to interview her,” Capt. Paul Starks, a police spokesman, said Saturday morning. “The welfare and location of the children remain our primary concern. They have not been located.” Hoggle was found late Friday, authorities said.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
She is the girl from a rundown neighborhood who became class president at a posh prep school. A quiet and driven Towson University student. An adoring mother. One of the unofficial leaders of the sisterhood of wives and girlfriends of Ravens teammates. Janay Ashley Rice is also a woman America has seen knocked unconscious by the man she loves. The grainy clip of her now-husband, former Ravens running back Ray Rice, punching her in an elevator has been played repeatedly on national media in the past week.
NEWS
By Casey Gwinn | September 8, 2014
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and the Baltimore Ravens have been taking a great deal of heat for their lenient treatment of running back Ray Rice for punching his then fiancée (now wife) in February 2014. Now, with the video of the actual assault circulating on the Internet, the heat has intensified, with the Ravens releasing him from the team, even though the facts of the case, already known to the Ravens and the NFL, have not changed. Ray Rice is seen in the video knocking Janay Palmer unconscious in an Atlantic City elevator and then dragging her lifeless body into the hall, where he eventually props her against a wall.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The mother of a 38-year-old man who police say sneaked a gun into a Baltimore police station and committed suicide said she doesn't believe the department's version of events. "I don't feel that my son committed suicide," Verdessa McDougald said. On Tuesday, police said officers from the Baltimore-area Warrant Apprehension Task Force picked up Woodson because they had a warrant for his arrest on suspicion of attempted murder in a recent shooting. He was taken to the Southwestern District police station.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Small Bites is a round-up of news and tidbits from Baltimore's dining scene The fun never stops for   Dead Rise Old Bay summer ale , the mammoth hit from Flying Dog Brewery. On July 31, Wit & Wisdom is hosting a Dead Rise party on its waterside patio to celebrate the release of the "The Dead Rise Old Bay Cookbook," which features recipes from the likes of Bryan Voltaggio, Spike Gjerde and Wit & Wisdom's own Zach Mills-- including grilled oysters with peaches, crab macaroni and cheese, catfish tacos, and Old Bay peanut brittle ice cream.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Baltimore is featured on the July 22 episode of "Drunk History" on Comedy Central, with Lutherville native Derek Waters and company re-enacting stories from the lives of  Edgar Allan Poe, Francis Scott Key and Abraham Lincoln. The episode, which includes portions filmed at Mother's Federal Hill Grille, is at its off-the-wall best in the Poe segment. Here's some of what I wrote about the episode, and an interview I did with Waters when he filmed in Baltimore. “I didn't choose Baltimore just because it's my hometown,” Waters said during an interview in January when he and his crew were here to film part of the episode in a jam-packed, loud and extra-boozy Mother's Federal Hill Grille.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
It was a bleak moment for Angela Bethea when she realized she couldn't have a child. But the child arrived nonetheless — born to a distant relative and left behind in the hospital. "We opened the door of our hearts as God saw fit, and in came Brea," said Bethea, holding the 23-month-old girl in her lap, husband Jerome Bethea beside her. "She has been a tremendous blessing." The city's Department of Social Services invited foster families such as the Betheas to a brunch Sunday, thanking them on Mother's Day for the care they give to city children birthed by others.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
Breast-feeding didn't come easy at first for Sharalyn Webre, who struggled through five months with her first child. But with more experience, patience and family support, feedings were less complicated with her next two children, including a baby girl born last week at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Now, for the first time, Maryland health officials are pushing all hospitals in the state to create policies to smooth the process for even more new mothers like Webre. They say breast milk is better for a baby's health and too many mothers are switching to formula feedings.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Rebecca Butchock's bed is feeling very empty this week, and her 2-year-old son, Liam, worries that everyone he loves who gets out of his sight may never come back. Their beloved dog, Ruby, got away from a friend during a walk earlier this week and they've mobilized a solid team of friends -- those they know in real life and some they only know on social media -- to find her. It's been a tragic month for the mother and son. “On the fourth of July,” says Butchock, “my boyfriend and Liam's father died very suddenly of a heart attack.” On the 12th, a friend offered to take Ruby for a hike at a farm in Glyndon to give Rebecca a bit of a break, but something spooked the terrier mix and she bolted, yanking her leash out of the friend's hand and vanishing into the woods.
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