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NEWS
June 13, 1995
America. Apple pie. Mom. And don't forget building moratoriums.Particularly in communities that have been rattled by growth and change, some folks put construction bans on the same lofty perch of honor with mom, pies from scratch and Uncle Sam. In Baltimore County, the administration of County Executive Dutch Ruppersberger is opposed to extending the county's five-year ban against development in neighborhoods where elementary schools are 20 percent above...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The comeback narrative is well-trodden pop-music territory: Disappear from public consciousness once the hits stop coming, toil away in the studio quietly for an extended period and then surprise everyone with a major splash of new material. In the rare case you do it right - like say, Justin Timberlake - chart domination can follow. But for countless others, the comeback trail is less forgiving. When Brandy returned to music from a nearly four-year hiatus in 2012, the R&B singer and actress seemed poised to regain her place among the genre's elite.
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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 8, 1992
Boston. -- My young friend will celebrate her first Mother's Day a little ahead of schedule, or at least ahead of her due date. It is going to be a prenatal event. Her table will be decorated with a sonogram, and her labors toasted with something decaffeinated.Like many women her age, 30, and this age, 1992, she has planned for this parenthood, although ''planned'' is far too lame a word. My friend has nested with more attention to detail than the robins on my walnut tree. Her child will come genetically tested, gender-known, prenamed, untouched by a drop of alcohol or single pesticide-infested piece of fruit.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 11, 2014
Just in time for Father's Day, I'd like to say happy Mother's Day to all the dads out there. It turns out, you are more like her than you knew. Long after the kids are grown and gone, a mother's body bears witness to pregnancy, childbirth and nursing. But researchers say the change may be most profound in her brain. From earliest times - and in primates and other mammals - females have become more focused as a result of having offspring. They are increasingly aware of the environment and the dangers it presents.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | October 28, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Tomorrow, that bastion of feminism (and for what it's worth, my alma mater), Barnard College, will host a conference on motherhood. Don't yawn. This is news. When I was a student at Barnard 20-odd years ago, the wish to become a mother was something one only whispered about. To admit such a thing openly was to mark yourself as a reactionary. The point of the women's movement, we were given to understand, was to free women from all that. Volumes of feminist literature detailed the drudgery, boredom and depression motherhood inevitably entailed.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 9, 2002
BOSTON -- If you ever find out who came up with the old saying about motherhood and apple pie, let me at 'em. Apple pie may be the bland and generic American dessert, but the idea that the mother 'hood is a placid suburb of agreement that thrives on a diet of platitudes doesn't fit my vision of the modern landscape. We may wake up Sunday with breakfast in bed and a bouquet in the vase, but this Mother's Day truce won't last as long as the flowers. Childbearing has become a fractious territory.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 7, 2002
BOSTON -- Unless you live in northern Texas, you might have missed the story. The dateline was Throckmorton, and it was only a paragraph long. A father killed his three children as he was returning them from a custodial visit to their mother. The deaths of Corie, Casey and Chase Smallwood didn't make the evening news. There are no debates on whether their father, James, was sane. No one will ask whether he deserves the death penalty for shooting his children -- because he administered that penalty to himself.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,Contributing Writer | September 11, 1992
Motherhood, it seems, dies hard.Three times a week, The Clay Menagerie in Pasadena becomes stomping grounds for women, most of whom have retired from the full-time rigors of raising children, dedicating countless hours to a new task: learning the exquisite art of crafting fancy porcelain baby dolls."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff | May 8, 2005
Toward the end of Anne Tyler's novel The Clock Winder, you learn that the lead character's name has changed. She used to be Elizabeth, a tomboyish woman who made her living as "handyman" to a Roland Park widow. Now, all of a sudden, she's married and a mother. Her former boss started calling her "Gillespie" after suffering a stroke, and now everyone does. She is someone completely new. It may not always be this dramatic, but motherhood transforms. Formal holiday or no, each mother has her own personal Mother's Days -- the days when something happens, in her head or in her heart, that tells her she is treading on new ground.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | May 12, 1991
No one could ever accuse Everett Thorner Rosenfeld of being a publicity hound.There he sleeps on a spring afternoon, curled up on a blanket in the backyard of his Brooklandville home, while his mother, WMAR-TV anchor Sally Thorner, tries everything from pacifiers to rattles to the lighthearted threat of ice cubes to arouse him for a photo session."
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| May 10, 2013
When Jill Smokler - more widely known as Scary Mommy - starts talking about motherhood, you'll hear a lot about sleepless nights, green snot and having kids walk into the master bedroom at the most inopportune times. Does she think her children are amazing and love them to death? Definitely. But mothering them didn't come naturally. As she says in her new book, "Motherhood Comes Naturally (and Other Vicious Lies)," what does come naturally is "Food. Sleep. Comfort. Privacy.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 28, 2010
Any mom worth her carpool car keys will recognize Elizabeth, the fraught and embattled mother in Anne Lamott's new book, "Imperfect Birds. " Every siren sends her imagination flying to the place on the road where she is certain her teen-age daughter, Rosie, lies bleeding. Every exchange with Rosie is likely to flare like a match and burn them both. And every mother whose heart has been wrung out like a dish rag by a daughter will recognize Rosie, a smart, athletic, beautiful lying machine on the cusp of college.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 19, 2008
Women are waiting longer to have children, and more women than ever are choosing not to have children at all, according to a new Census Bureau report. Twenty percent of women ages 40 to 44 have no children, double the level of 30 years ago, the report said; and women in that age bracket who do have children have fewer than ever - an average of 1.9 children, compared with the median of 3.1 children in 1976. "A lot of women are not having any children," said Jane Lawler Dye, a Census Bureau researcher who did the report, which looked at women of childbearing age in 2006.
NEWS
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and Sarah Kickler Kelber,Sun Reporter | May 11, 2008
I AM PLURAL. My husband and I are expecting a baby boy in mid-June, but because it took us so long to get to this point, for a while it didn't seem real. Several bloggers I read frequently have noted that when you get pregnant after a struggle with infertility, at first it can feel like you're just playing the role of a mother-to-be. It was like that for me, after two years of trying. Eight home pregnancy tests, properly doubling beta blood-test results and two early ultrasounds be damned: For weeks, I felt like I was starring in some elaborate masquerade.
NEWS
By Laura Ciolkowski and Laura Ciolkowski,Chicago Tribune | August 26, 2007
Embryo Culture Making Babies in the Twenty-First Century By Beth Kohl Sarah Crichton/Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 288 pages / $24 In 1978, an eternity ago as measured by advances in science and technology, the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, was born in England. Either a tiny blessing from heaven brought into the world with a little help from a team of miracle workers in white lab coats, or a suspicious "alien life-form" manufactured in the artificial light of a petri dish, Louise was for many a Rorschach test for the rapidly growing arsenal of modern reproductive technologies.
NEWS
By Carolyn Peirce and Carolyn Peirce,Sun Reporter | March 25, 2007
As a child, on the rare occasions when she wasn't reading, Jennifer Holm could be found roughhousing with her four brothers, playing tag on the family farm in Audubon, Pa., climbing trees or challenging them to spitting contests. Books were a favorite pastime, broadening her horizons, captivating her imagination, offering escape from reality. But in the end, it was the time she spent with her family that fueled her art. Holm, a children's writer, has drawn upon those family experiences again and again to inspire her professionally.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clare McHugh and Clare McHugh,Special to the Sun | May 2, 2004
Women authors writing about motherhood are like fundamentalist ministers, preaching black and white in a profoundly gray world. They typically have a single focus. There are those who believe that every mother should stay home and raise her own children -- anything less is a renouncement of her true feminine identity and duty. Others argue that no woman can find self-fulfillment, or sufficient economic security, if she throws over paid employment to stay home and take care of the kids full time.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | October 5, 2003
It used to be easier. Their mothers and grandmothers didn't think much about whether they would have children or not. That was what married women did. But today's women aren't just considering motherhood in terms of when, but if. Many are searching their souls about a role that used to seem natural. In the past 20 years, the number of American women not having children has almost doubled, and society has grown more accepting of that choice. But advances in medicine have also made it possible for older women to conceive, leaving motherhood a question to contemplate much later in life.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG AND DAVID SELIG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG AND DAVID SELIG,SUN REPORTERS | June 10, 2006
With all the talk of the young guns on the LPGA tour this year, it's easy to forget about some of the veterans who still have plenty of game. But 37-year-old Pat Hurst, a mother of two who won a major championship when Michelle Wie was just 8 years old, has been doing her best to change that this week at Bulle Rock. Hurst shot a first-round 66 Thursday, which at the time was a course record, then followed it up by birdieing her first two holes yesterday before a weather delay pulled the players off the course.
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