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Mother Teresa

NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 1997
ALTHORP HOUSE, Northamptonshire -- On a tiny island, set in a small lake, Diana, Princess of Wales was laid to rest yesterday at her ancient Northamptonshire home.The "People's Princess" was brought here in a hearse after the grand procession and funeral in London's Westminster Abbey. Buried with her was a rosary given to her by Mother Teresa.It took the cortege about two hours to cover the 68 miles from Central London to the gates of Althorp. People watched in towns and villages along the way. The fever of grief of the past week seemed to be abating.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and Christian Ewell and John Rivera and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jamie Stiehm contributed to this article | September 6, 1997
An East Baltimore neighborhood where drugs are rampant and violence commonplace remembered yesterday a visit by a small, stooped woman who offered a ray of hope and, perhaps, a miracle.It was at the intersection of Collington and Ashland avenues, near where a group of men were shooting a game of craps yesterday afternoon, that Mother Teresa came in May 1996 to visit her Missionaries of Charity at the Gift of Hope Convent. The Hopkins-Middle East neighborhood turned out in force to see what the fuss was all about.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
Cardinal William H. Keeler remembered Mother Teresa yesterday not just as the living saint that much of the world perceived her to be, but as someone of indefatigable energy, with a great sense of humor."
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Arthur Hirsch and Ken Fuson and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
To President Clinton, she was "one of the giants of our time." Other world leaders yesterday called her an "angel of mercy," "a symbol to the world."But Mother Teresa, who died yesterday of a heart attack, was more than a symbol to thousands around the world, individuals whose lives she touched through 50 years of work on behalf of the poor and suffering. Here are the recollections of five Marylanders who were touched by her spirit.It was 6 a.m., dawn in Calcutta, when Sean Callahan first met Mother Teresa.
NEWS
April 2, 1997
NEW YORK -- How's this for multiculturalism: An Albanian woman, born in Serbia, trained in Ireland, travels to India and becomes a teacher. After a time, she starts an organization dedicated to the poor, which then sets up 500 more shelters in 95 countries; for her work she is awarded a Nobel Peace Prize. After nearly 70 years of service she turns her operation over to another woman, an ethnic Indian.This may seem like a utopian World Federalist fantasy, but it's the story of Mother Teresa, who founded the Missionaries of Charity in 1950 and just last month, at age 86, stepped down from her post as superior general.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 6, 1997
THOUGH WE LIVE in a time of e-mail and voice-mail and faxes, newspaper columnists (yes, even this one) still get lots of regular mail.Basically, this mail can be divided into two categories: letters that make sense -- in which the columnist is recognized as a literary giant and clear-thinking visionary -- and letters from wackos, a wacko being anyone who disagrees with the columnist.An example of a good letter would be the following:Dear Sir,Your column on how Americans clutter their bathrooms was the funniest and most insightful ever written on the subject.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 13, 1997
Mother Teresa in a cinnamon bun in a coffeehouse in Nashville? No, no, no! That's not Mother Teresa. Bill and Pat Kelly, TJI readers in Northeast Baltimore, see it differently, and I think they're right. They slipped Disney's "Pocahontas" in the VCR Friday night, and suddenly it hit them: Grandmother Willow. It's not Mother Teresa in the bun, it's Pocahontas' spiritual adviser. Having a 4-year-old daughter and having seen "Pocahontas" about 20 times by now, I have to agree. There's a lot more Grandmother Willow than Mother Teresa in the bun. And this figures: Disney is Everywhere, overtly and subliminally seducing America with its marketing imagery.
NEWS
July 4, 1996
Group homes for the elderly make senseMaryland officials will soon decide whether they can find funds for a small pilot program of subsidies for residents of group homes. Let's hope they do.There are a significant number of elderly individuals in Maryland who need 24-hour supervision because of physical and mental ailments but who do not need skilled nursing care. Both skilled and unskilled care can cost a good deal, and these individuals can quickly exhaust their resources. Under the current system, many of these individuals are placed in nursing homes, with Medicaid -- read: taxpayers -- paying $70 day for their care.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
Reporter: I'm having lunch with Christopher Hitchens on Monday.Friend of Hitchens: Take your Alka-Seltzer.Reporter: Oh, I won't try to keep up with him.FOH: There's no question of one's keeping up with him.Reporter: I probably won't drink at all. I don't when I'm working.FOH: Then you won't have an authentic Christopher Hitchens experience.Reporter: Are you saying I should plan on taking the train, so I won't have to worry about driving back?FOH: I think that would be best. My authentic Christopher Hitchens experience begins in Timberlake's, an unpretentious place in Washington, where he has taught the bartender to make unassailable Tanqueray martinis.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
True story: Media critic Mark Crispin Miller has just begun to eat a gourmet take-out salad in The Sun lunch room when he finds a flat, round piece of cardboard among the tuna and greens."
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