Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMother Teresa
IN THE NEWS

Mother Teresa

NEWS
September 14, 1997
The following are excerpts from two eulogies at Mother Teresa' funeral:Cardinal Angelo Sodano, the Vatican secretary of state and Pope John Paul II's representative at Mother Teresa's funeral:"The hour has arrived for us to say a final farewell to the late Mother Teresa. We are coming here from many corners of the world to demonstrate our affection and gratitude and render a fitting homage. From the cold bier, the unforgettable and dear mother continues to speak to us and seems to repeat the Lord's words: 'It is more blessed to give than receive.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | September 14, 1997
THIS MONTH HAS claimed two of my favorite nuns, the fabled Mother Teresa of Calcutta and Sister Mary Sulpice, who at 105 succumbed in her monastery's infirmary in the western hills of Massachusetts.I saw Mother Theresa just once, the day she came to her Gift of Hope Convent on Collington Avenue in East Baltimore, which also houses a hospice for the terminally ill, often AIDS patients recently released from prison.A large crowd gathered, and she didn't disappoint as she climbed the steps of the church pulpit next door and spoke.
NEWS
By JOSEPH GALLAGHER | September 14, 1997
Mother Teresa once joked that if you want to give God a laugh, tell him your plans. Her plans, fulfilled and unfulfilled, would surely make any deity smile.Although Jesus warned his followers that they would be "hated by all for my name's sake," the woman born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu was one disciple who evoked global smiles and enjoyed almost universal acclaim - the Nobel Peace Prize, countless laudatory stories in journals everywhere, honorary U.S. citizenship. It had been reported that Pope John Paul II was thinking of making her a cardinal.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1997
In the week since Mother Teresa's death, Roman Catholics have begun discussing whether she should be declared a saint. Even normally cautious clerics have joined in: "I personally would canonize her tomorrow," says Cardinal John J. O'Connor of New York. "I think she is a saint in heaven."But who determines saintliness?The idea of sainthood is nearly as old as Christianity, beginning with the contemporaries of Jesus -- the Apostles and martyrs, the Christians who gave their lives for their faith during the LTC Roman persecutions.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper | September 12, 1997
"RIGOROUS poverty has been our safeguard,'' Mother Teresa once observed. ''We do not want, as has been the case with other religious orders throughout history, to begin serving the poor and then gradually move toward serving the rich. In order for us to understand and to help those who lack everything,'' she continued, ''we have to live as they live.''If any one word can explain Mother Teresa, the controversial Roman Catholic nun, whom some believe to be a saint, it's poverty. Members of the Missionaries of Charity, the religious order she founded in Calcutta, India, not only take a vow of poverty, as other religious orders do. They also live it. Missionaries of Charity see poverty as freedom, and believe the fewer material things one has, the fewer things one has to take care of.This way, the sisters can care for ''the poorest of the poor,'' whom they vow to serve.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 10, 1997
I arrived at Ashland and Collington avenues at exactly the same time the police helicopter did, which gave the moment an old familiar feel. The propellers beat against the gray sky. The helicopter stopped, circled sharply, then stopped again, as if dangling by a string, about 100 feet above the rowhouse rooftops. There were several other people on the street at the moment. I was the only one who looked up.I'm just a voyeur here. Over the years, I'd been in this East Baltimore neighborhood to cover homicides -- teen-age boys caught up in a drug war, an old woman who'd been murdered during a rowhouse burglary -- and for a few other stories far less disturbing.
NEWS
By Kathleen Feeley | September 10, 1997
AS I REJOICE in the life of Mother Teresa of Calcutta and mourn her death, I remember with awe her visit to the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. She came to contribute to our celebration of International Women's Year, 1975. She had dinner with us, gave an evening lecture and spent the night. This is how it happened.In the early '70s, many women's colleges joined the nationwide movement to coeducation. Notre Dame had renewed its strong commitment to the education of women when I became president in 1971.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1997
Baltimoreans said farewell yesterday to Mother Teresa as they gathered for a Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption, the same place where the nun from Calcutta, India, last year brought her message of prayer, simplicity and commitment to the poor.With four nuns of the Missionaries of Charity, the order founded by Mother Teresa, looking on from a front pew, Cardinal William H. Keeler eulogized her as someone "who by her example of prayer and faith could encourage us to see and believe God's spiritual presence at work in our world."
NEWS
September 7, 1997
FOR MILLIONS, she was a living saint, or at least proof that in the modern world one might yet live a saintly life. The message from her work with the poorest of the poor in Calcutta spread through the world across all boundaries of class, nationality and faith. The death of Mother Teresa of Calcutta, at 87, is near-universally mourned.Nuns in the Catholic Church take vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. For the Missionaries of Charity she founded in Calcutta in 1948, Mother Teresa added a fourth -- compassion.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
If a Christian wants to learn how to emulate the works of Jesus, look no further than Mother Teresa.That is the message that will be delivered today from pulpits in Roman Catholic churches across Maryland as a result of Mother Teresa's death Friday in Calcutta.Priests writing their sermons yesterday said they were suffering no writer's block this weekend: Mother Teresa's life of service to the poorest of the poor is reflected perfectly in the Scripture readings scheduled today, which speak of healing the blind, deaf and lame.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.