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Mother Teresa

NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
When the Rev. James Garneau describes his first encounter with Mother Teresa in Baltimore in 1976, it sounds as though he was, for a moment, in the presence of God on Earth. "I was just awed," said Garneau, academic dean of the Pontifical College Josephinum in Ohio. "Not because of one particular thing she said, but because what she said was so simple and clear. She was just brimming with joy." Like Garneau, most people who met Mother Teresa seem to describe her as almost intoxicated by God. Few people knew, however, that for five decades, Mother Teresa experienced a prolonged spiritual depression - intense doubts not only about her faith, but also about the existence of God. She wrote in a particularly bleak letter to one of her spiritual advisers: "They think that my faith, my hope and my love are overflowing, and that my intimacy with God and union with His Will fill my heart.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - The wife of spy suspect Robert Hanssen has told authorities that he confided to her and to a Catholic priest about 20 years ago that he had begun supplying information to the KGB. She said that the priest initially urged Hanssen to turn himself in, but then changed his mind and persuaded Hanssen to donate the $20,000 he had received from the Soviet Union to charity, government officials and others involved in the case said. Hanssen told his wife that he gave the money, in small installments, to Mother Teresa's charitable efforts, according to the account she gave to investigators.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and David L. Greene and Mary Gail Hare and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1999
Fourteen-year-old Jamie Ridgely never asked to be recognized for feeding the hungry and helping the poor of Carroll County. She certainly never expected to win an award inspired by Mother Teresa. But, all that happened yesterday in Washington. The North Carroll High School freshman won the National Caring Award, given by the nonprofit Caring Institute to recognize remarkable effort helping one's community. Jamie has raised money for charity since she was a 9-year-old pulling her little red wagon through her Manchester neighborhood and asking for cans of food to feed the hungry.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1999
Two years ago, John F. Kennedy Jr. sat down to reflect on celebrity, death and the existence of God.It wasn't the first time we were offered an intimate glimpse of the 38-year-old presidential namesake. From the time he was a toddler, his life's landmarks have been publicly shared: his salute at his father's funeral; his exuberant exit from a church following his 1996 wedding to Carolyn Bessette; his gentle touch of his mother's tombstone.We were also privy to his mundane moments: his shirtless Frisbee games; his Central Park spat with Bessette; his strolls with his dog, Friday.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1998
Albert Schweitzer had a kind of humanitarian glamour when he received the Nobel Prize in 1952.He was something like the Mother Teresa of his time. Much as she had served the poor in the slums of Calcutta, Schweitzer had established a missionary hospital in the equatorial jungle of Africa in 1913. He lived and worked there until his death at 90 in 1965.During his lifetime he was perhaps even more revered and respected than Mother Teresa is now. Life magazine once called him "the greatest man alive."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Jill Hudson Neal and Ivan Penn and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1998
Known as one of the world's leading advocates for alleviating hunger, U.S. Rep. Tony P. Hall served a taste of his passion during Loyola College's commencement yesterday, urging graduates to help others as they pursue their careers."
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | January 21, 1998
There's none of the pomp and glitz that surrounded the tribute album to Princess Diana, but now Mother Teresa has her own musical memorial too.Titled "Mother, We'll Miss You," the album, released yesterday, stars Jose Feliciano and a cast of mostly unknown acts from the Christian community."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1997
Mother Teresa's life was a lot more compelling than what's depicted in "Mother Teresa: In the Name of God's Poor," getting its premiere on the Family Channel tomorrow night.Not that the film is all that bad: In a rare TV performance, Geraldine Chaplin is appropriately anxious and accepting as the Albanian-born nun who answered God's call by devoting her life to the poorest of India's poor. And the film is imbued with tons of good will, even a few poignant moments that, by themselves, offer insights into the forces that drove this remarkable woman.
NEWS
September 27, 1997
Photo worth a thousand wordsI was immediately taken by the poignant beauty of the photograph on Page One Sept. 19, captioned ''Assessing the damage.''I was not surprised, however, to find that it was taken by Algerina Perna, one of the finest photographers on your staff.Ms. Perna adds a dignity and beauty to every subject she portrays.Thanks you for bringing us her fine work.Jonathan P. WestBel AirFather Gallagher didn't get Mother TeresaWhat a distressing and surprising item to appear in the Sunday Sun critical of Mother Teresa, on the day (Sept.
NEWS
September 22, 1997
Banks' weapon should have remained secretIn the Sept. 17 Sun, you printed a front-page article, ''Microchip is latest weapon against crime,'' which revealed that ''local banks have been inserting tiny electronic tracking devices into packs of money that tellers give to bank robbers.'' You went on to explain how the device works.The second paragraph indicated such devices had been "the Police Department's most closely guarded secret in its war against bank holdups.''Later in the article, you said the police commissioner, a police spokesman and officials at NationsBank had refused to comment about the microchip.
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