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Mother Teresa

NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - The wife of spy suspect Robert Hanssen has told authorities that he confided to her and to a Catholic priest about 20 years ago that he had begun supplying information to the KGB. She said that the priest initially urged Hanssen to turn himself in, but then changed his mind and persuaded Hanssen to donate the $20,000 he had received from the Soviet Union to charity, government officials and others involved in the case said. Hanssen told his wife that he gave the money, in small installments, to Mother Teresa's charitable efforts, according to the account she gave to investigators.
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NEWS
October 23, 1993
Cleared for takeoff "Not bad for a girl from Michigan, huh?" Those are the words with which Madonna left her homecoming party in Auburn Hills, Mich. Some 18,000 fans attended her concert Thursday at The Palace of Auburn Hills, near her hometown of Rochester Hills.Madonna dedicated her performance of "Why It's So Hard" to her Michigan dance teacher, Christopher Flynn, and other people with AIDS.Reno eyes Series, roots for PhilliesU.S. Attorney General Janet Reno never got to watch television when she was a child, but she is making up for lost time with the World Series.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 6, 1997
THOUGH WE LIVE in a time of e-mail and voice-mail and faxes, newspaper columnists (yes, even this one) still get lots of regular mail.Basically, this mail can be divided into two categories: letters that make sense -- in which the columnist is recognized as a literary giant and clear-thinking visionary -- and letters from wackos, a wacko being anyone who disagrees with the columnist.An example of a good letter would be the following:Dear Sir,Your column on how Americans clutter their bathrooms was the funniest and most insightful ever written on the subject.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1999
Two years ago, John F. Kennedy Jr. sat down to reflect on celebrity, death and the existence of God.It wasn't the first time we were offered an intimate glimpse of the 38-year-old presidential namesake. From the time he was a toddler, his life's landmarks have been publicly shared: his salute at his father's funeral; his exuberant exit from a church following his 1996 wedding to Carolyn Bessette; his gentle touch of his mother's tombstone.We were also privy to his mundane moments: his shirtless Frisbee games; his Central Park spat with Bessette; his strolls with his dog, Friday.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 13, 1997
Mother Teresa in a cinnamon bun in a coffeehouse in Nashville? No, no, no! That's not Mother Teresa. Bill and Pat Kelly, TJI readers in Northeast Baltimore, see it differently, and I think they're right. They slipped Disney's "Pocahontas" in the VCR Friday night, and suddenly it hit them: Grandmother Willow. It's not Mother Teresa in the bun, it's Pocahontas' spiritual adviser. Having a 4-year-old daughter and having seen "Pocahontas" about 20 times by now, I have to agree. There's a lot more Grandmother Willow than Mother Teresa in the bun. And this figures: Disney is Everywhere, overtly and subliminally seducing America with its marketing imagery.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | September 14, 1997
THIS MONTH HAS claimed two of my favorite nuns, the fabled Mother Teresa of Calcutta and Sister Mary Sulpice, who at 105 succumbed in her monastery's infirmary in the western hills of Massachusetts.I saw Mother Theresa just once, the day she came to her Gift of Hope Convent on Collington Avenue in East Baltimore, which also houses a hospice for the terminally ill, often AIDS patients recently released from prison.A large crowd gathered, and she didn't disappoint as she climbed the steps of the church pulpit next door and spoke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Holton and Ray Holton,Special to the Sun | November 30, 2003
A Saint, More or Less, by Henry Grunwald. Random House. 236 pages. $23.95. In the quarter-century reign of Pope John Paul II, admission to sainthood appears to be a tool aimed at energizing the world's 900 million Roman Catholics. He has recognized more than 470 saints and proclaimed more than 1,300 other candidates for sainthood in beatification ceremonies. Along the way to breaking the records of all previous popes in the saint-naming business, Pope John Paul has changed some of the rules.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | January 6, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- At the edge of a Nairobi neighborhood called the Ghetto, there is a bridge across a gray, stinking creek, on a street called Mother Teresa Road. The creek has become a frontier between two worlds, and the bridge the border crossing. Yesterday, under the protection of paramilitary police, people shuttled from one side to another, carrying furniture, bedding, bags and pots as they steadily divided themselves by tribe. On one side of the bridge, in the Ghetto, no Luos can live.
NEWS
May 24, 1996
Rabbi Berlin marks 20 years at Oheb ShalomOn May 31, Temple Oheb Shalom will celebrate the 20th anniversary of Rabbi Donald Berlin's service to the congregation.Activities will include a Shabbat Dinner in the synagogue's Blaustein Auditorium at 6 p.m. and a Shabbat Service at 8: 15 p.m, featuring a tribute from Berlin's friend and mentor, Rabbi Jordan Pearlson of Temple Sinai in Toronto.For the past four years, Berlin has been national chairman of the Rabbinical Placement Commission on the Reform Movement.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2006
In the Ravens' minds, they aren't playing just the New Orleans Saints on Sunday. They are playing, as coach Brian Billick puts it, "the sweethearts of the league." "Everybody loves them, and deservedly so. You go in and beat them, you might as well go and beat up Mother Teresa - you know, `You scums, what are you doing here?' " Billick said. "But that is what we are going to try to do, because there is a great deal of energy and emotion there right now." The Saints have become the feel-good story of the NFL this season, rallying a city that has been slowly rebuilding itself since Hurricane Katrina.
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