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Mother Teresa

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By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
When the Rev. James Garneau describes his first encounter with Mother Teresa in Baltimore in 1976, it sounds as though he was, for a moment, in the presence of God on Earth. "I was just awed," said Garneau, academic dean of the Pontifical College Josephinum in Ohio. "Not because of one particular thing she said, but because what she said was so simple and clear. She was just brimming with joy." Like Garneau, most people who met Mother Teresa seem to describe her as almost intoxicated by God. Few people knew, however, that for five decades, Mother Teresa experienced a prolonged spiritual depression - intense doubts not only about her faith, but also about the existence of God. She wrote in a particularly bleak letter to one of her spiritual advisers: "They think that my faith, my hope and my love are overflowing, and that my intimacy with God and union with His Will fill my heart.
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FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Arthur Hirsch and Ken Fuson and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
To President Clinton, she was "one of the giants of our time." Other world leaders yesterday called her an "angel of mercy," "a symbol to the world."But Mother Teresa, who died yesterday of a heart attack, was more than a symbol to thousands around the world, individuals whose lives she touched through 50 years of work on behalf of the poor and suffering. Here are the recollections of five Marylanders who were touched by her spirit.It was 6 a.m., dawn in Calcutta, when Sean Callahan first met Mother Teresa.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Dole | August 24, 2010
It is a day forever emblazoned in my memory. It was Aug. 5, 1992, and I was serving as president of the American Red Cross. The renowned humanitarian and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Mother Teresa was visiting Baltimore, and a meeting between the two of us had been arranged. I spent much of the hourlong trip from Washington, D.C. reflecting on the remarkable life story of the woman born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in what is now Macedonia on Aug. 26, 1910 — 100 years ago this week. At 18, Agnes would leave home and embark on a seven-week sea journey that would take her to Calcutta, India, where she joined the Sisters of Loreto, an Irish-based religious order, and where she would adopt the name "Teresa.
NEWS
By JOSEPH GALLAGHER | September 14, 1997
Mother Teresa once joked that if you want to give God a laugh, tell him your plans. Her plans, fulfilled and unfulfilled, would surely make any deity smile.Although Jesus warned his followers that they would be "hated by all for my name's sake," the woman born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu was one disciple who evoked global smiles and enjoyed almost universal acclaim - the Nobel Peace Prize, countless laudatory stories in journals everywhere, honorary U.S. citizenship. It had been reported that Pope John Paul II was thinking of making her a cardinal.
NEWS
September 7, 1997
FOR MILLIONS, she was a living saint, or at least proof that in the modern world one might yet live a saintly life. The message from her work with the poorest of the poor in Calcutta spread through the world across all boundaries of class, nationality and faith. The death of Mother Teresa of Calcutta, at 87, is near-universally mourned.Nuns in the Catholic Church take vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. For the Missionaries of Charity she founded in Calcutta in 1948, Mother Teresa added a fourth -- compassion.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
True story: Media critic Mark Crispin Miller has just begun to eat a gourmet take-out salad in The Sun lunch room when he finds a flat, round piece of cardboard among the tuna and greens."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1997
In the week since Mother Teresa's death, Roman Catholics have begun discussing whether she should be declared a saint. Even normally cautious clerics have joined in: "I personally would canonize her tomorrow," says Cardinal John J. O'Connor of New York. "I think she is a saint in heaven."But who determines saintliness?The idea of sainthood is nearly as old as Christianity, beginning with the contemporaries of Jesus -- the Apostles and martyrs, the Christians who gave their lives for their faith during the LTC Roman persecutions.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper | September 12, 1997
"RIGOROUS poverty has been our safeguard,'' Mother Teresa once observed. ''We do not want, as has been the case with other religious orders throughout history, to begin serving the poor and then gradually move toward serving the rich. In order for us to understand and to help those who lack everything,'' she continued, ''we have to live as they live.''If any one word can explain Mother Teresa, the controversial Roman Catholic nun, whom some believe to be a saint, it's poverty. Members of the Missionaries of Charity, the religious order she founded in Calcutta, India, not only take a vow of poverty, as other religious orders do. They also live it. Missionaries of Charity see poverty as freedom, and believe the fewer material things one has, the fewer things one has to take care of.This way, the sisters can care for ''the poorest of the poor,'' whom they vow to serve.
NEWS
By John Rivera and Christian Ewell and John Rivera and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jamie Stiehm contributed to this article | September 6, 1997
An East Baltimore neighborhood where drugs are rampant and violence commonplace remembered yesterday a visit by a small, stooped woman who offered a ray of hope and, perhaps, a miracle.It was at the intersection of Collington and Ashland avenues, near where a group of men were shooting a game of craps yesterday afternoon, that Mother Teresa came in May 1996 to visit her Missionaries of Charity at the Gift of Hope Convent. The Hopkins-Middle East neighborhood turned out in force to see what the fuss was all about.
NEWS
September 27, 1997
Photo worth a thousand wordsI was immediately taken by the poignant beauty of the photograph on Page One Sept. 19, captioned ''Assessing the damage.''I was not surprised, however, to find that it was taken by Algerina Perna, one of the finest photographers on your staff.Ms. Perna adds a dignity and beauty to every subject she portrays.Thanks you for bringing us her fine work.Jonathan P. WestBel AirFather Gallagher didn't get Mother TeresaWhat a distressing and surprising item to appear in the Sunday Sun critical of Mother Teresa, on the day (Sept.
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