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Mother Teresa

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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
If a Christian wants to learn how to emulate the works of Jesus, look no further than Mother Teresa.That is the message that will be delivered today from pulpits in Roman Catholic churches across Maryland as a result of Mother Teresa's death Friday in Calcutta.Priests writing their sermons yesterday said they were suffering no writer's block this weekend: Mother Teresa's life of service to the poorest of the poor is reflected perfectly in the Scripture readings scheduled today, which speak of healing the blind, deaf and lame.
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NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 20, 2003
VATICAN CITY - Royalty prayed alongside the poor, and Indian dancers shared the stage with the world's most eminent prelates as Pope John Paul II beatified Mother Teresa of Calcutta yesterday, giving the famous nun an elite status one step short of sainthood just six years after her death. Before an enormous audience that spilled from St. Peter's Square down the broad Via della Conciliazione to the Tiber River, the woman already known as "the Saint of the Gutters" for her work with the sick, dying and unwanted was named "blessed" by a frail, sick pope.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1997
Baltimoreans said farewell yesterday to Mother Teresa as they gathered for a Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption, the same place where the nun from Calcutta, India, last year brought her message of prayer, simplicity and commitment to the poor.With four nuns of the Missionaries of Charity, the order founded by Mother Teresa, looking on from a front pew, Cardinal William H. Keeler eulogized her as someone "who by her example of prayer and faith could encourage us to see and believe God's spiritual presence at work in our world."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1996
Don't mess with Mother Teresa.That's the word to those putting on a film series on religious fundamentalism, which is being sponsored by the Johns Hopkins University.One of the movies scheduled to be shown next week at the Baltimore Museum of Art has triggered an angry reaction among local Roman Catholics. It's an attack on the diminutive 85-year-old Albanian nun who has spent the last 45 years tending the poor and dying in the squalor of Calcutta. Already people are lining up to defend Mother Teresa, who just visited Baltimore last week to watch 35 members of her order renew their vows at the Basilica of the Assumption.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | February 16, 1994
FIRST, let's agree on one thing: Mother Teresa is not a Republican. She's probably not even a conservative.That much having been said, her presence in Washington, D.C., last week provided a jarring juxtaposition of philosophies and values between the sublime and the . . . well, let me describe the two events.The first event was the retraction, by prominent "pro-choice" advocate Kate Michelman, of a statement she made to a newspaper. The statement? "We think abortion is a bad thing. No woman wants to have an abortion."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Frank P. L. Somerville and Bruce Reid and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writers | August 5, 1992
Victoria Goldbech, 72, a lifelong member of St. Wenceslaus Church in East Baltimore, said she hoped to touch a "living saint" today.Mother Teresa of Calcutta, one of the world's most admired religious figures, is scheduled to help dedicate a convent for her order of Roman Catholic nuns today near the church, at Collington and Ashland avenues.Mother Teresa also planned to attend a special Mass for invited guests this afternoon in St. Wenceslaus.Mrs. Goldbech is not alone.As city sanitation crews feverishly cleaned the streets around the church in preparation for Mother Teresa's visit, members of St. Wenceslaus and some residents of the surrounding neighborhood hoped to at least catch of glimpse of the tiny woman they say has done so much good around the world.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
EMMITSBURG -- Mother Teresa came to this small town in Western Maryland last night and urged a crowd of about 2,000 people to serve the poor and pray for those with AIDS."
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
Mother Teresa, the 4-foot-10 champion of the poor, visited Baltimore yesterday, offering blessings to the faithful and comfort to the sick.Surrounded by dozens of nuns and about 1,000 admirers, the 85-year-old missionary participated in a Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption, the nation's oldest Roman Catholic cathedral. Looking frail and walking gingerly, she climbed a platform that was placed on the altar especially for her and urged the congregation to strive for compassion and family unity.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer Staff writer Melody Simmons contributed to this article | August 6, 1992
They came to Ashland and Collington avenues from the trash-strewn streets and alleys nearby, from the giant Johns Hopkins medical complex hovering a couple of blocks away, from downtown offices and from greener Roland Park and Ruxton and Catonsville and Timonium -- even from as far as Hawaii.They walked, took the bus or came in cars, including a well-groomed woman in a white BMW convertible searching for a parking space. More than 1,000 people flocked yesterday afternoon to St. Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church in a blighted East Baltimore neighborhood to catch a glimpse of a tiny, stooped, wrinkled woman in a white and blue sari with a captivating smile and a simple message of love and peace.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 1996
More than 25 protesters gathered outside the Baltimore Museum of Art last night to warn the public about a man they call a bigot and what they call his 25-minute film of hate."
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