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Mother Teresa

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NEWS
April 2, 1997
NEW YORK -- How's this for multiculturalism: An Albanian woman, born in Serbia, trained in Ireland, travels to India and becomes a teacher. After a time, she starts an organization dedicated to the poor, which then sets up 500 more shelters in 95 countries; for her work she is awarded a Nobel Peace Prize. After nearly 70 years of service she turns her operation over to another woman, an ethnic Indian.This may seem like a utopian World Federalist fantasy, but it's the story of Mother Teresa, who founded the Missionaries of Charity in 1950 and just last month, at age 86, stepped down from her post as superior general.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 16, 2013
Three famous men died on Nov. 22, 1963. The one getting the most attention, understandably, is John F. Kennedy. Less so the other two: Aldous Huxley, author of the futuristic novel "Brave New World," and Clive Staples Lewis. Of the three, it was Mr. Lewis who not only was the most influential of his time, but whose reach extends to these times and likely beyond. His many books continue to sell and the number of people whose lives have been changed by his writing expands each year.
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NEWS
By Kathleen Feeley | September 10, 1997
AS I REJOICE in the life of Mother Teresa of Calcutta and mourn her death, I remember with awe her visit to the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. She came to contribute to our celebration of International Women's Year, 1975. She had dinner with us, gave an evening lecture and spent the night. This is how it happened.In the early '70s, many women's colleges joined the nationwide movement to coeducation. Notre Dame had renewed its strong commitment to the education of women when I became president in 1971.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Dole | August 24, 2010
It is a day forever emblazoned in my memory. It was Aug. 5, 1992, and I was serving as president of the American Red Cross. The renowned humanitarian and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Mother Teresa was visiting Baltimore, and a meeting between the two of us had been arranged. I spent much of the hourlong trip from Washington, D.C. reflecting on the remarkable life story of the woman born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in what is now Macedonia on Aug. 26, 1910 — 100 years ago this week. At 18, Agnes would leave home and embark on a seven-week sea journey that would take her to Calcutta, India, where she joined the Sisters of Loreto, an Irish-based religious order, and where she would adopt the name "Teresa.
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | January 21, 1998
There's none of the pomp and glitz that surrounded the tribute album to Princess Diana, but now Mother Teresa has her own musical memorial too.Titled "Mother, We'll Miss You," the album, released yesterday, stars Jose Feliciano and a cast of mostly unknown acts from the Christian community."
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | August 5, 1992
Mother Teresa of Calcutta, one of the world's most admired religious figures, is scheduled to help dedicate a convent for her order of Roman Catholic nuns this afternoon in East Baltimore on her first visit to this city.The 81-year-old superior of the Missionaries of Charity, which she founded in India in 1950, will be driven to Baltimore from the American headquarters of the order in the Bronx, N.Y.She plans to attend a special Mass for invited guests at 3 p.m. in St. Wenceslaus Church, at Ashland and Collington avenues.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 10, 1997
I arrived at Ashland and Collington avenues at exactly the same time the police helicopter did, which gave the moment an old familiar feel. The propellers beat against the gray sky. The helicopter stopped, circled sharply, then stopped again, as if dangling by a string, about 100 feet above the rowhouse rooftops. There were several other people on the street at the moment. I was the only one who looked up.I'm just a voyeur here. Over the years, I'd been in this East Baltimore neighborhood to cover homicides -- teen-age boys caught up in a drug war, an old woman who'd been murdered during a rowhouse burglary -- and for a few other stories far less disturbing.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
In Baltimore, when someone has something to give -- a Thanksgiving turkey, money from a school bake sale, a truckload of shoes -- Bea Gaddy is the likely recipient.This 61-year-old woman, known as the "Mother Teresa of Baltimore," has made her name the stamp of approval for local fund-raisers. She also made herself famous, showing up everywhere from the "CBS Morning News" to the "Jenny Jones" talk show. Billboards with her likeness are expected to go up around town soon.Just last month, Ms. Gaddy was inducted into the African-American Hall of Fame in Atlanta.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1997
Mother Teresa's life was a lot more compelling than what's depicted in "Mother Teresa: In the Name of God's Poor," getting its premiere on the Family Channel tomorrow night.Not that the film is all that bad: In a rare TV performance, Geraldine Chaplin is appropriately anxious and accepting as the Albanian-born nun who answered God's call by devoting her life to the poorest of India's poor. And the film is imbued with tons of good will, even a few poignant moments that, by themselves, offer insights into the forces that drove this remarkable woman.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1997
Cardinal William H. Keeler remembered Mother Teresa yesterday not just as the living saint that much of the world perceived her to be, but as someone of indefatigable energy, with a great sense of humor."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Fourteen years after Mother Teresa's last visit to Baltimore, her blood, her hair and several of her personal effects returned to the city Wednesday. The items, which also include a rosary and sandals worn by the candidate for Catholic sainthood, were displayed for several hours at the hospice for AIDS patients she opened in East Baltimore in 1992. In the chapel at the Gift of Hope hospice on Ashland Avenue, operated by Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity, Shirley Sapp paused before the frayed shoes.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | December 9, 2009
I was not ready to see Bruce Springsteen bemedalled at the Kennedy Center Honors last week, and I still am not ready. It was less than a year ago the Boss did that fantastic slide across the stage on his knees at the Super Bowl halftime show, thrusting his crotch at 90 million Americans on live TV, and here he was, listening to various nobodies tell him how great he is, with a medal around his neck, and his neck looked a little jowly. The Kennedy Honors is for the Extinguished: It's America's way of saying, "Sit down and take a load off, time's up, old-timer."
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | January 6, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- At the edge of a Nairobi neighborhood called the Ghetto, there is a bridge across a gray, stinking creek, on a street called Mother Teresa Road. The creek has become a frontier between two worlds, and the bridge the border crossing. Yesterday, under the protection of paramilitary police, people shuttled from one side to another, carrying furniture, bedding, bags and pots as they steadily divided themselves by tribe. On one side of the bridge, in the Ghetto, no Luos can live.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 2, 2007
I was sitting on the deck in a chaise longue. God was floating on his back in the pool. I pointed to the night sky, a white disk of moon rising magisterially into an infinity of black. "Nice work," I said. God didn't answer. "And hey, thanks for the weather today," I said, "75 degrees, low humidity, a nice breeze. Well done." Still no answer. He gets in these quiet moods sometimes. "Now I know how Mother Teresa felt," I groused, laughing to show him I was just kidding. Might as well have been laughing at the moon.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2006
In the Ravens' minds, they aren't playing just the New Orleans Saints on Sunday. They are playing, as coach Brian Billick puts it, "the sweethearts of the league." "Everybody loves them, and deservedly so. You go in and beat them, you might as well go and beat up Mother Teresa - you know, `You scums, what are you doing here?' " Billick said. "But that is what we are going to try to do, because there is a great deal of energy and emotion there right now." The Saints have become the feel-good story of the NFL this season, rallying a city that has been slowly rebuilding itself since Hurricane Katrina.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Holton and Ray Holton,Special to the Sun | November 30, 2003
A Saint, More or Less, by Henry Grunwald. Random House. 236 pages. $23.95. In the quarter-century reign of Pope John Paul II, admission to sainthood appears to be a tool aimed at energizing the world's 900 million Roman Catholics. He has recognized more than 470 saints and proclaimed more than 1,300 other candidates for sainthood in beatification ceremonies. Along the way to breaking the records of all previous popes in the saint-naming business, Pope John Paul has changed some of the rules.
NEWS
September 14, 1997
The following are excerpts from two eulogies at Mother Teresa' funeral:Cardinal Angelo Sodano, the Vatican secretary of state and Pope John Paul II's representative at Mother Teresa's funeral:"The hour has arrived for us to say a final farewell to the late Mother Teresa. We are coming here from many corners of the world to demonstrate our affection and gratitude and render a fitting homage. From the cold bier, the unforgettable and dear mother continues to speak to us and seems to repeat the Lord's words: 'It is more blessed to give than receive.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 20, 2003
VATICAN CITY - Royalty prayed alongside the poor, and Indian dancers shared the stage with the world's most eminent prelates as Pope John Paul II beatified Mother Teresa of Calcutta yesterday, giving the famous nun an elite status one step short of sainthood just six years after her death. Before an enormous audience that spilled from St. Peter's Square down the broad Via della Conciliazione to the Tiber River, the woman already known as "the Saint of the Gutters" for her work with the sick, dying and unwanted was named "blessed" by a frail, sick pope.
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