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NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | February 6, 1993
Founded in 1792, Baltimore's oldest Roman Catholic parish opened a school in 1815. The teaching continued, uninterrupted, for 172 years. Then, in 1987, lack of money forced St. Patrick's on South Broadway to close its parochial school, dispersing 130 students.Church officials were not happy about it -- but they are celebrating now. A new partnership "gets us back in the business of education again," said the Rev. Blair P. Raum, St. Patrick's pastor."Quite a shot in the arm," Ronald J. Valenti, archdiocesan school superintendent, said.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 8, 2010
It was a sad month when the wreckers leveled the old St. Mary's Seminary on Paca Street in the mid-1970s. When the Victorian landmark where so many Roman Catholic priests received their religious education disappeared, its components went everywhere. At one time, I owned a Calvert Street rowhouse with a staircase partially constructed from spindles salvaged from this part of old Baltimore. Just as the doors and weathervane were salvaged from the old seminary and put to new uses, its location was also repurposed.
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NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
Whenever it was time for band practice at her last school, Shilesha Adams would watch enviously as her classmates ran off to their lessons.Her mother told her the sessions were too expensive, but that didn't make it any less painful. She wanted to play.So, when her new school -- Mother Seton Academy in Upper Fells Point -- started a free band program this academic year, Shilesha, 11, didn't hesitate to sign up.A few lessons later, the sixth-grader is a budding saxophonist."I always wanted to play in a band," Shilesha said during practice last week.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | August 15, 2009
The crape myrtle was at its summertime height the other day when I wandered into the Seton Hill neighborhood to see the area's newest arrival. Without fanfare, a new Mother Seton House visitors center has risen in one of Baltimore's most venerable locations. It's tucked between Mother Seton House and the old St. Mary's Seminary Chapel. This location, only a few blocks west of the Washington Monument and Mount Vernon Place, is not as well known as it should be. St. Mary's Park and the adjoining collection of National Register of Historic Place landmarks provide a delightfully atmospheric glimpse into early Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2004
In northernmost Frederick County sits Emmitsburg, an unassuming little town perhaps best known for the role it has played in the American Roman Catholic Church. Emmitsburg owes much to the Catholic refugees who came to the area looking for a place to practice their faith. Father John DuBois, founder of St. Mary's College, invited recently widowed Elizabeth Ann Seton to move to the area and begin her life anew. Father DuBois also established a church and a replica of the French Grotto of Lourdes in the nearby hills.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
Sister Mary Bader was having a hectic morning. The cook at Mother Seton Academy called in sick, so Sister Mary made breakfast for 69 pupils. There was no heat in one of the classrooms, so she checked the furnace. When two visitors showed up for a tour, she ushered them around. All before she cooked lunch. Sister Mary, principal at the academy, took it in stride. She is used to improvising and handling jobs usually assigned to maintenance workers or janitors. The school, which is in Fells Point, has neither.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | August 15, 2009
The crape myrtle was at its summertime height the other day when I wandered into the Seton Hill neighborhood to see the area's newest arrival. Without fanfare, a new Mother Seton House visitors center has risen in one of Baltimore's most venerable locations. It's tucked between Mother Seton House and the old St. Mary's Seminary Chapel. This location, only a few blocks west of the Washington Monument and Mount Vernon Place, is not as well known as it should be. St. Mary's Park and the adjoining collection of National Register of Historic Place landmarks provide a delightfully atmospheric glimpse into early Baltimore.
NEWS
June 25, 1992
Honoring the religious communityGovernor William Donald Schaefer and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke are honoring the Baltimore religious community today for its support of the Baltimore Nehemiah Project -- providing houses for low- and moderate-income buyers in the Penn North and Sandtown-Winchester neighborhoods.Through BUILD, Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development, an inter-racial ecumenical organization, the religious community raised more than $2.2 million in construction financing for the $24 million development of 300 housing units.
NEWS
July 31, 2006
Razing the rectory will boost school The Sun's article on the demolition of the rectory at St. Stanislaus Kostka Roman Catholic Church was, to be charitable, one-sided ("Fells Point rectory demolished," July 25). The real story is that certain board members at Mother Seton Academy, a no-tuition Catholic-sponsored school which educates underprivileged middle-schoolers, have committed their own cash and credit to ensure that the profits from developing the site for high-end townhomes go to the school rather than to private developers.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1994
George Matthew Webster sank back on the sofa in his Carroll County home and watched his mother and father lob the details of his life back and forth across the room.. . . Entered St. John's Literary Institution at Prospect Hall at 12 . . . accepted to St. Mary's College on full honors scholarship at 16 . .And now, at 19 years old, he has been offered a full scholarship to earn his Ph.D. at Princeton.To him, it's all academic."Matthew takes everything in stride," said his father, Larry Webster, who works for an insurance company that specializes in supplementary care for the elderly.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 11, 2009
It has the look of a classic urban parochial school: no-frills architecture, granite walls and stairs pounded by saddle shoes. And now, nearly four decades after the last pupil at what was then St. Ann's School closed a composition notebook, the three-story building at Greenmount Avenue and 22nd Street is being readied to accept a new school. Some of Baltimore's best-known philanthropists and charities - led by Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti and his wife, Renee - have donated $7 million to renovate the building to accommodate Mother Seton Academy, a 15-year-old school now housed in a Fells Point convent.
NEWS
July 31, 2006
Razing the rectory will boost school The Sun's article on the demolition of the rectory at St. Stanislaus Kostka Roman Catholic Church was, to be charitable, one-sided ("Fells Point rectory demolished," July 25). The real story is that certain board members at Mother Seton Academy, a no-tuition Catholic-sponsored school which educates underprivileged middle-schoolers, have committed their own cash and credit to ensure that the profits from developing the site for high-end townhomes go to the school rather than to private developers.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Despite years of planning and bingo fund-raisers, a grass-roots group's hopes of turning its former Fells Point church into a Slavic heritage museum were dashed yesterday. St. Stanislaus Kostka Church Museum Inc. found out that it had lost its bid to buy the church from the Franciscan friars. Instead, the South Ann Street property will go to Mother Seton Academy, a Catholic school next to it that wants to expand. Late last year the likelihood of a deal between the museum group and the friars appeared unlikely.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2004
In northernmost Frederick County sits Emmitsburg, an unassuming little town perhaps best known for the role it has played in the American Roman Catholic Church. Emmitsburg owes much to the Catholic refugees who came to the area looking for a place to practice their faith. Father John DuBois, founder of St. Mary's College, invited recently widowed Elizabeth Ann Seton to move to the area and begin her life anew. Father DuBois also established a church and a replica of the French Grotto of Lourdes in the nearby hills.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
Sister Mary Bader was having a hectic morning. The cook at Mother Seton Academy called in sick, so Sister Mary made breakfast for 69 pupils. There was no heat in one of the classrooms, so she checked the furnace. When two visitors showed up for a tour, she ushered them around. All before she cooked lunch. Sister Mary, principal at the academy, took it in stride. She is used to improvising and handling jobs usually assigned to maintenance workers or janitors. The school, which is in Fells Point, has neither.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
Whenever it was time for band practice at her last school, Shilesha Adams would watch enviously as her classmates ran off to their lessons.Her mother told her the sessions were too expensive, but that didn't make it any less painful. She wanted to play.So, when her new school -- Mother Seton Academy in Upper Fells Point -- started a free band program this academic year, Shilesha, 11, didn't hesitate to sign up.A few lessons later, the sixth-grader is a budding saxophonist."I always wanted to play in a band," Shilesha said during practice last week.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 8, 2010
It was a sad month when the wreckers leveled the old St. Mary's Seminary on Paca Street in the mid-1970s. When the Victorian landmark where so many Roman Catholic priests received their religious education disappeared, its components went everywhere. At one time, I owned a Calvert Street rowhouse with a staircase partially constructed from spindles salvaged from this part of old Baltimore. Just as the doors and weathervane were salvaged from the old seminary and put to new uses, its location was also repurposed.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Despite years of planning and bingo fund-raisers, a grass-roots group's hopes of turning its former Fells Point church into a Slavic heritage museum were dashed yesterday. St. Stanislaus Kostka Church Museum Inc. found out that it had lost its bid to buy the church from the Franciscan friars. Instead, the South Ann Street property will go to Mother Seton Academy, a Catholic school next to it that wants to expand. Late last year the likelihood of a deal between the museum group and the friars appeared unlikely.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1994
George Matthew Webster sank back on the sofa in his Carroll County home and watched his mother and father lob the details of his life back and forth across the room.. . . Entered St. John's Literary Institution at Prospect Hall at 12 . . . accepted to St. Mary's College on full honors scholarship at 16 . .And now, at 19 years old, he has been offered a full scholarship to earn his Ph.D. at Princeton.To him, it's all academic."Matthew takes everything in stride," said his father, Larry Webster, who works for an insurance company that specializes in supplementary care for the elderly.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | February 6, 1993
Founded in 1792, Baltimore's oldest Roman Catholic parish opened a school in 1815. The teaching continued, uninterrupted, for 172 years. Then, in 1987, lack of money forced St. Patrick's on South Broadway to close its parochial school, dispersing 130 students.Church officials were not happy about it -- but they are celebrating now. A new partnership "gets us back in the business of education again," said the Rev. Blair P. Raum, St. Patrick's pastor."Quite a shot in the arm," Ronald J. Valenti, archdiocesan school superintendent, said.
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