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Mother S Life

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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
For 20 years, William Buckman and Marjorie Surell have been haunted by how their mother spent the last moments of her life. Lena Buckman was stabbed to death in September 1980, about an hour after she arrived at Surell's Pikesville home to celebrate the Jewish High Holy Days. As activists organize rallies to stop Eugene Colvin-el from being executed for the murder, Buckman and Surell say that their mother's life -- and death -- must be remembered. "The most painful thing is thinking about what the last moments of her life were like," said Buckman, 70, of Northbrook, Ill. "She didn't deserve to die like that.
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NEWS
By Art Winslow and Art Winslow,Los ANgeles Times | April 8, 2007
Angelica By Arthur Phillips Random House / 336 pages / $25.95 Edmund Wilson's 1934 essay "The Ambiguity of Henry James" famously put forth a Freudian-steeped argument that the apparitions in James' The Turn of the Screw were not real ghosts but figments of the sexually repressed governess' imagination. No one but the governess sees the ghosts, after all, and James himself had remarked in a preface that the apparitions "are of the order of those involved in witchcraft cases rather than of those in cases of psychic research."
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
As anyone who has followed the life of Dr. Benjamin Carson surely knows, the undisputed hero of the famous brain surgeon's life is his mother. Sonya Carson was a rock of determination who overcame poverty and crushing disappointment to see her two sons succeed. She worked two or three housekeeping jobs at once, squirreled meager savings under a mattress and, while hiding her own illiteracy, demanded that the boys shun television for books. And when life's burdens became too great to bear, she would leave the youngsters with friends and check into a mental hospital.
NEWS
By TED KOOSER | May 28, 2006
Most of us have taken at least a moment or two to reflect upon what we have learned from our mothers. Through a catalog of meaningful actions that range from spiritual to domestic, Pennsylvanian Julia Kasdorf evokes the imprint of her mother's life on her own. - Ted Kooser I learned from my mother how to love the living, to have plenty of vases on hand in case you have to rush to the hospital with peonies cut from the lawn, black ants still stuck...
NEWS
By Lisa Respers | May 10, 2001
A devastating loss sparked something creative in Damon Krometis. The death of his mother, Lauren Krometis, in 1999 at age 48 stirred within him thoughts about how the unexpected death of a mother might affect those left behind. The result is his play, "No Regrets," which will have preview showings at 7 p.m. today, tomorrow and Saturday at Glenelg High School. The work so impressed Glenelg's drama teacher, Sue Leader, that she is allowing the 17-year-old senior to direct the play. It's a challenge Krometis said he welcomed.
NEWS
March 20, 2003
Lenore Breslauer, 80, a founding member of the antiwar citizens group Another Mother for Peace during the Vietnam War, died of lung cancer Friday at her home in West Hollywood, Calif. Another Mother for Peace, a grass-roots organization launched by a group of women in Los Angeles in 1967, grew to have more than 450,000 people on its mailing list, and its logo became an internationally recognized symbol for peace: A sunflower bearing the message, "War is not healthy for children and other living things."
NEWS
October 29, 2003
Abortion ban puts the unborn ahead of women As I read of the Senate vote to approve the ban on a procedure called "partial-birth abortion," I was chilled by the fact that this law makes no exception for a mother's life or health ("Senate OKs bill to limit abortion," Oct. 22). Sen. Rick Santorum stated that "this is a very, very important day for this country and for those babies who would be the object of this brutal procedure." But when does it get to be an important day for some woman whose life or quality of health may hinge on this procedure?
NEWS
By Art Winslow and Art Winslow,Los ANgeles Times | April 8, 2007
Angelica By Arthur Phillips Random House / 336 pages / $25.95 Edmund Wilson's 1934 essay "The Ambiguity of Henry James" famously put forth a Freudian-steeped argument that the apparitions in James' The Turn of the Screw were not real ghosts but figments of the sexually repressed governess' imagination. No one but the governess sees the ghosts, after all, and James himself had remarked in a preface that the apparitions "are of the order of those involved in witchcraft cases rather than of those in cases of psychic research."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Book Editor | April 17, 2005
Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's Life By Samuel G. Freedman. Simon & Schuster. 339 pages. $25. To Socrates' assertion that an unexamined life is not worth living, a current crop of authors is adding a corollary: Life isn't worth living without examining one's parents' lives, either. Former New York Times editor Joseph Lelyveld, Francine du Plessix Gray and Sean Wilsey all have written new books that excavate the lives and characters of their parents. Each of those writers proved wise enough to be born to compelling, book-worthy subjects, either by virtue of admirable characteristics (Lelyveld)
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | December 24, 1995
I HAVE HEARD women say that their mothers are their best friends, and I have wondered what they meant.Do they stay up late with their mothers and give each other pedicures? Do they drink too much wine with their mothers and complain about their husbands, their children?Are their mothers the ones they call when panic rises like a bubble inside their chests, when tears run down their faces, when nights go sleepless?Are their mothers the ones they ask when they want an honest answer? Am I fat?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Book Editor | April 17, 2005
Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's Life By Samuel G. Freedman. Simon & Schuster. 339 pages. $25. To Socrates' assertion that an unexamined life is not worth living, a current crop of authors is adding a corollary: Life isn't worth living without examining one's parents' lives, either. Former New York Times editor Joseph Lelyveld, Francine du Plessix Gray and Sean Wilsey all have written new books that excavate the lives and characters of their parents. Each of those writers proved wise enough to be born to compelling, book-worthy subjects, either by virtue of admirable characteristics (Lelyveld)
NEWS
October 29, 2003
Abortion ban puts the unborn ahead of women As I read of the Senate vote to approve the ban on a procedure called "partial-birth abortion," I was chilled by the fact that this law makes no exception for a mother's life or health ("Senate OKs bill to limit abortion," Oct. 22). Sen. Rick Santorum stated that "this is a very, very important day for this country and for those babies who would be the object of this brutal procedure." But when does it get to be an important day for some woman whose life or quality of health may hinge on this procedure?
NEWS
March 20, 2003
Lenore Breslauer, 80, a founding member of the antiwar citizens group Another Mother for Peace during the Vietnam War, died of lung cancer Friday at her home in West Hollywood, Calif. Another Mother for Peace, a grass-roots organization launched by a group of women in Los Angeles in 1967, grew to have more than 450,000 people on its mailing list, and its logo became an internationally recognized symbol for peace: A sunflower bearing the message, "War is not healthy for children and other living things."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
As anyone who has followed the life of Dr. Benjamin Carson surely knows, the undisputed hero of the famous brain surgeon's life is his mother. Sonya Carson was a rock of determination who overcame poverty and crushing disappointment to see her two sons succeed. She worked two or three housekeeping jobs at once, squirreled meager savings under a mattress and, while hiding her own illiteracy, demanded that the boys shun television for books. And when life's burdens became too great to bear, she would leave the youngsters with friends and check into a mental hospital.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers | May 10, 2001
A devastating loss sparked something creative in Damon Krometis. The death of his mother, Lauren Krometis, in 1999 at age 48 stirred within him thoughts about how the unexpected death of a mother might affect those left behind. The result is his play, "No Regrets," which will have preview showings at 7 p.m. today, tomorrow and Saturday at Glenelg High School. The work so impressed Glenelg's drama teacher, Sue Leader, that she is allowing the 17-year-old senior to direct the play. It's a challenge Krometis said he welcomed.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
For 20 years, William Buckman and Marjorie Surell have been haunted by how their mother spent the last moments of her life. Lena Buckman was stabbed to death in September 1980, about an hour after she arrived at Surell's Pikesville home to celebrate the Jewish High Holy Days. As activists organize rallies to stop Eugene Colvin-el from being executed for the murder, Buckman and Surell say that their mother's life -- and death -- must be remembered. "The most painful thing is thinking about what the last moments of her life were like," said Buckman, 70, of Northbrook, Ill. "She didn't deserve to die like that.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | March 24, 1992
On June 9, 1975, Roselda Katz Cole died of cancer. When her daughter Diane recalls that time -- still as painfully close as a thought -- she speaks of the devastation of losing the guide to her future as well as a friend with whom she shared great joy.Soon after her mother's death, Ms. Cole decided to heal in fresh surroundings, leaving her home in Baltimore for a new job in Washington. Restless, searching, the 23-year-old woman filled her empty hours by gobbling up anthologies of poetry andlistening again and again to the Brahms horn trio.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | July 22, 1991
Washington. -- "The issue from hell. It never goes away.'' That's the way Robin Rothrock, president of the Louisiana League of Women Voters, describes the abortion issue.The issue taints and twists election campaigns. Now it's set to dominate the fight over Clarence Thomas' nomination for the Supreme Court. No less than 600 anti-abortion bills have been introduced in legislatures since the Supreme Court in 1989 virtually invited states to pass laws challenging Roe v. Wade's abortion rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 21, 1999
You can get into some of life's most useless arguments over terminology. But, pedants and prattlers aside, accept this truth: There are no more implacable enemies, no more distant opposites, than sentimentality and art. Simply, a Hallmark card is the antithesis of a Degas painting. "Kumbaya" is at the other end of the universe from Schubert's C Major quintet.Another simple truth: Unless you are a devoted matricidal maniac, it is impossible to write about your mother -- how she brought you up and how she died -- without sentimentality.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | December 24, 1995
I HAVE HEARD women say that their mothers are their best friends, and I have wondered what they meant.Do they stay up late with their mothers and give each other pedicures? Do they drink too much wine with their mothers and complain about their husbands, their children?Are their mothers the ones they call when panic rises like a bubble inside their chests, when tears run down their faces, when nights go sleepless?Are their mothers the ones they ask when they want an honest answer? Am I fat?
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