Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMother Nature
IN THE NEWS

Mother Nature

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 3, 2012
Talk to any scientist about losing all that power and they may agree. It just could be that mother nature is fighting back. What have we done to earn her trust? Not much, I'm afraid. The Indians knew how, but most of them are gone. For starters, lets take better care of what we do have. We can't afford another power outage. We rely on mother nature so much yet look at how much we take her for granted. Maryanne T. Nobile, Gwynn Oaks
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck and The Schmuck Stops Here | October 13, 2014
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Don't let all the predictable denials fool you. The steady rain that postponed Game 3 of the American League Championship Series was just what the doctor ordered for an Orioles team that could use a little celestial intervention to cool off the sizzling Kansas City Royals. Who cares if it was a doctor of meteorology? The Royals have won six straight postseason games and seven straight overall dating back to the last day of the regular season, so anything that interrupts their biorhythms should be more than OK with the Orioles.
Advertisement
EXPLORE
April 1, 2011
Dogs & Company Snowden Center 6925 Oakland Mills Road, Suite R Columbia 410-997-5888 www.dogsandcompany.com Dogs & Company, which carries all-natural and nontoxic products for dogs and cats, opened Jan. 22 at Snowden Center. Owner Terri Lewis also offers chiropractor, acupuncture and animal communicator services, animal training and doggie day care. A self-serve dog wash provides the space and supplies to make tub time easy. Mother Nature's 6955 F Oakland Mills Road Columbia 410-381-4351 www.wildbirdlady.com Feather your bird's nest with supplies from Mother Nature's (formerly the Wild Bird Center of Columbia)
NEWS
August 22, 2014
Regarding Bob Bruninga's recent letter, "Carbon fees are a payback to Mother Nature (Aug. 19), carbon fees can also be payback to us, which would make them much more realistic politically. Rather than having the government tax fossil fuel corporations, which then pass the cost on to consumers, let's have a carbon pollution fee paid by fossil fuel companies and rebated monthly to every American. Taxpayers have already shelled out over $1 trillion for climate change disasters caused by carbon emissions, so fossil fuels owe us, big time.
NEWS
August 19, 2011
Mr. Piette's letter on carbon tax ("Carbon fee is a tax to redistribute wealth," Aug. 15), demonstrates how far we have to go in environmental education. The carbon fee is not for the government, it is a payback to Mother Nature herself for the rape, burning and slow destruction of our environment that we have been doing for centuries (at no cost) and for which we show no signs of abating. For the free market to realize the damage and to be incentivized to move to better renewable energy, the true cost of fossil fuel burning to the environment must be included in the cost to consumers.
NEWS
By Charlotte and “Doc” Cronin410-638-0569 | April 19, 2013
What we know of what Mother Nature provides in the spring has come to us over years of watching for the emergence of spring flowers, the scampering of the squirrels, and the change in the songs of the birds. We like the idea of knowing when each sprout breaks through the cold earth of winter every green stick and flowering twig. Just getting whiff of the fresh perfume of the daffodils puts life into an otherwise dreary day! The love of flowers is universal. We saw Russian children in Moscow carrying handfuls of tulips in the month of May. In the South Seas, girls wear flowers in their hair and ropes of orchids around their necks.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
Mother Nature brought relief to a parched Baltimore on Sunday, but the persistent rain didn't dampen the spirits at the Earth Day festivities in Hampden. "We had a few hundred people come through today," said Don Barton, 29, an organizer of Sunday's Localize It! 2012, one of a series of events during the week to celebrate Earth Day in the Baltimore area. "People are braving the rain and seem to be having a good time. " Localize It!, sponsored by the Baltimore Free Farm, promotes local food, music and vendors.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck and The Schmuck Stops Here | October 13, 2014
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Don't let all the predictable denials fool you. The steady rain that postponed Game 3 of the American League Championship Series was just what the doctor ordered for an Orioles team that could use a little celestial intervention to cool off the sizzling Kansas City Royals. Who cares if it was a doctor of meteorology? The Royals have won six straight postseason games and seven straight overall dating back to the last day of the regular season, so anything that interrupts their biorhythms should be more than OK with the Orioles.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
More than 1,950 Howard County residents remained without power at Friday afternoon, as many struggled to regain a sense of normalcy after enduring a new twist in Mother Nature's winter repertoire. Tales of marathon commutes home Wednesday night, more than 120 abandoned vehicles — including on major highways — and cracking tree branches burdened with the heavy, frozen, wet snow set back many people who thought 2010's February storms would be the worst snow experience they would see. Howard County's public schools opened two hours late Friday due to the conditions.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
During a dark time in her life, Baltimore artist Meg Page sought solace by a pond and took the time to look into the eyes of nature. "There was this frog, and the specks of gold in his eyes were so spectacular that my heart lifted in the moment," she said. Also in that moment, nature changed from being her comforter to being her muse, and almost 20 years ago, the career of one of the country's great naturalist illustrators was launched. "It's all right here for us, this beauty.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 5, 2014
My husband the philosopher/sportswriter does not believe there is bad weather or good weather. There is just weather, he says, usually with a shrug. The temperature and precipitation are neither evil nor a blessing, neither brutal nor refreshing. They are just there . He will comment on the weather, acknowledging that it is hot outside or cold. And he will warn me about the weather - watch out for ice patches on the roads; take a break from the heat. But he doesn't judge it or curse it or praise it. He simply exists in it. I wish I had his equilibrium.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | February 13, 2014
UMBC women's lacrosse co-coach Tony Giro has been on the phone with Maryland coach Cathy Reese over the past few days trying to decide what to do about their season opener scheduled for 4 p.m. Thursday - during what could be a significant snow storm. Finally, they opted to postpone the game until 2 p.m. Friday at UMBC Stadium. It was originally rescheduled for noon Friday. “I just said we can't control Mother Nature,” Giro said. “We were thinking about doing it [Tuesday]
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
As a 5-year-old sitting on his great-grandmother's knee in the 1950s in Philadelphia, Marc Young listened patiently as she whispered in broken English the same two sentences she would come to repeat in a weekly ritual for years. "God gave the Ten Commandments to Moses on Mount Sinai. Ever since, the Jews are a special people to God," Grandma Rose would tell him in her thick Ukrainian accent while gently rubbing his forearm with hands gnarled by years of menial labor. "She wasn't so much stroking my arm as she was trying to grind her message into my chromosomes," recalled Young, a longtime Columbia resident who is now 62. The outcome of her wish - that her great-grandson take her place in passing along stories of Jewish history, culture and folklore - will be on display when he takes part in "Tales of Nature: An Afternoon of Professional Storytelling.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
Like Dan Rodricks , I visited Swallow Falls recently and was absolutely amazed at what Mother Nature had wrought ( "County Maryland old-growth trees among Sandy's tragic toll," Nov. 2). She is one tough mother, she gives and she takes away. I shot several dozen pictures trying to capture the scope of the devastation. From ground level, it just looks like a bunch old trees toppled over. When you get close to the trees you see the size and age very clearly. The thing I am amazed about is that Mr. Rodricks' column is the first I have seen about this anywhere in the eastern part of the state.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
During a dark time in her life, Baltimore artist Meg Page sought solace by a pond and took the time to look into the eyes of nature. "There was this frog, and the specks of gold in his eyes were so spectacular that my heart lifted in the moment," she said. Also in that moment, nature changed from being her comforter to being her muse, and almost 20 years ago, the career of one of the country's great naturalist illustrators was launched. "It's all right here for us, this beauty.
FEATURES
By Christianna McCausland, For The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
The homes of the Mid-Atlantic's waterfront communities epitomize coastal style. Whether on the beach in Ocean City or a creek on the Eastern Shore, the look is casual and calming, creating a style that makes its owners feel like every day is a vacation. Gina Fitzsimmons, owner of Fitzsimmons Design Associates and the Annapolis-based home furnishings store Details of Design, specializes in coastal homes. She calls this look "Chesapeake Cozy. " "I find that people in this region gravitate to a more comfortable, functional, tailored interior with a more eclectic look and natural materials," she says.
NEWS
July 1, 2002
IT WOULD BE easy, comforting even, to attribute the roaring fires ravaging northern Arizona and Colorado to the scourge of Mother Nature or the handiwork of an irresponsible forest ranger. But that would be too easy, and very wrong. As Arizona Sen. John McCain said recently, "There's plenty of blame to go around." Mother Nature has done her share: seven years of drought contributed to the dry, fire-hungry forest beds present today. High winds and lightning storms have exacerbated an already dire situation.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | July 19, 1993
Washington. -- One hundred and thirty Julys ago the president, referring to the Mississippi, said, ''The father of waters again goes unvexed to the sea.'' Lincoln was pleased, the occasion being the triumph of the siege of Vicksburg by a general from the Mississippi River town of Galena, Illinois, U.S. Grant.It would be nice if that willful river -- today 16 miles wide on some Illinois and Missouri plains -- would be more vexed by human ingenuity. But the big river, by riveting our attention on the unpredictable and uncontrollable sphere of life (which is almost all of life)
SPORTS
By Ryan Hood and The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
Hours after Kevin Gausman made his Camden Yards debut, 30 of the state's top high school senior baseball players -- most just four years younger than the rookie right-hander -- made theirs, playing in the 32nd annual Brooks Robinson All-Star Game at Oriole Park. Gausman lasted six innings. The prep athletes lasted two and a half. And then Mother Nature intervened with a thunderstorm, prompting the suspension of the remainder of the game. The teams will attempt to restart the game Tuesday at 2 p.m. at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By Charlotte and “Doc” Cronin410-638-0569 | April 19, 2013
What we know of what Mother Nature provides in the spring has come to us over years of watching for the emergence of spring flowers, the scampering of the squirrels, and the change in the songs of the birds. We like the idea of knowing when each sprout breaks through the cold earth of winter every green stick and flowering twig. Just getting whiff of the fresh perfume of the daffodils puts life into an otherwise dreary day! The love of flowers is universal. We saw Russian children in Moscow carrying handfuls of tulips in the month of May. In the South Seas, girls wear flowers in their hair and ropes of orchids around their necks.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.