Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMother Goose
IN THE NEWS

Mother Goose

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By The Reporter,Fond du Lac,Wis | June 28, 1991
JUST WHEN you thought you'd heard every last damming word about American children's ignorance,along comes the news that our toddlers don't know Mother Goose.Bette Goldstone,an education proffessor at Beaver College surveyed 150 preschoolers in suburban Philadelphia.More than a third apparently never heard " Jack Be Nimble," " Hey.Diddle Diddle," or " Little Miss Muffett." Goldstone deplores their deprivation because nursery rhymes develop children's feel for Language and prepare them to read.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
David Joseph Kessler, former president and owner of Kessler Shoe Manufacturing Co., whose Mother Goose line of shoes was worn by generations of children throughout the nation, died Monday of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Pikesville resident was 88. Born in Baltimore, the son of an immigrant shoemaker from Europe, Mr. Kessler was raised in Northwest Baltimore. During the 1920s, his father made $40-a-pair hand-turned women's shoes. "They were made so well that you could fold them up and put them in your pocket.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 21, 1995
The brutally competitive world of children's entertainment is no fairy tale. Just ask the owners of the Enchanted Forest, the 40-year-old Ellicott City amusement park that failed to reopen Memorial Day weekend, the traditional start of its summer season.In an era when amusement parks tout "thrill-packed joy rides," it isn't easy to stay ahead of the curve. Establishments such as Chuck E. Cheese and Discovery Zone have also jumped into the amusement market to provide an array of high-energy rides and games.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | June 29, 2009
Track and field Baltimore Olympian Carter retires during nationals event James Carter has reached the finish line of his track and field career. At 31, the veteran 400-meter hurdler out of Mervo and Hampton University, a two-time Olympian and three-time U.S. national champion, announced his retirement Sunday after failing to complete his event at the USA Championships at Hayward Field, Eugene, Ore. After hitting several hurdles in the final of the...
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt | April 14, 1991
No one would have guessed that "Mother Goose" was about to "fly" away.Like many times before, 81-year-old Marian Mathews, known in certain story circles as Mother Goose, was decked out in her storytelling-best, wearing a festive cotton jumper and a dotted Swiss hat. Sitting cross-legged on the floor, Mathews gave her undivided attention to 5-year-old Greg Bartos. This time, however, she was offering her weekly story hour for the last time at the Savage Community Library, atthe Carroll Baldwin Community Hall in Savage.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 2000
THE GLAD cries of "snow day!" are countered by some disappointment at Laurel Woods Elementary. Reading teacher Nancy Gifford has heard complaints from disappointed children in the Mother Goose class. The children aren't learning nursery rhymes. These sophisticated kindergartners and first-graders are participants in "Mother Goose Asks Why" -- a five-session, weekly after-school program teaching parents about science in classic children's literature. The program "teaches parents how to look at books to teach scientific concepts and habits, to look at the ideas in the books," Gifford said.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford | July 8, 1992
The West Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a seminar, "The Organized Desktop: How to Get It Off Your Desk," from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., July 16 at the Fort Meade Officers Club, 6600 Mapes Road, Fort Meade.The guest speaker will be Theresa Gale, administrative manager of EBM Systems.Ms. Gale will explain how to establish an effective filing system that includes remembering where items are filed, where to put priority items, how long to keep specific documents, how to make effective use of limited space and what computer software programs are available to help you get Post It notes off your desk.
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | December 28, 1992
Last week, the 4-year-olds at St. John's Cooperative Nursery School presented their own version of Mother Goose and more traditional plays for their annual Christmas program.Tammy Chilipko's class performed the play "Christmas Magic." With Ms. Chilipko dressed as Mother Goose and the children as nursery rhyme characters, they waited in Mother Goose Land for a surprise visit from Frosty the Snowman (Chris Holland) and Mrs. Santa Claus (Nicole Galanakis). Characters in the play included Ashley Beard, Samantha Dupaya and Jennafer Green as Rock-A-Bye-Babies.
SPORTS
By MARTY McGEE CO. HORSE RACING | June 16, 1991
Lite Light will return to New York for a rematch against Meadow Star in the Coaching Club American Oaks July 6, but it's going to be hard to match their awesome duel in the Mother Goose Stakes at Belmont Park a week ago.Meadow Star won by about a half-inch, giving a fitting end to what the New York Racing Association rightfully called the year's best weekend of racing in the country.Unwarranted criticism of jockey Corey Nakatani, who rode Lite Light, will long be forgotten when the 1991 Mother Goose is included in a list of memorable races.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee HC | May 31, 1991
Lite Light will not run in the June 8 Belmont Stakes after all.The filly instead will run against her own kind, including Meadow Star, in the Mother Goose Stakes at Belmont Park the next day, one of her owners, Louis Burrell Jr., said yesterday from California.The decision sets up a potentially dramatic match among the nation's top two 3-year-old fillies.The size of the Belmont field, which should be the biggest in eight years, was a factor in causing Lite Light's owners to skip the Belmont, Burrell said.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Martha Clark had just finished digging a hole outside the store at her Ellicott City petting farm when 10 people came trudging out of the nearby woods carrying a giant, rust-covered metal candy cane on their shoulders. The group made its way up the hill and carefully lowered the end of the cane into the hole. After several shovels full of dirt - along with a pause to scoop a wayward toad out of the way - another piece of the former Enchanted Forest amusement park had reached its new home.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
After spending years in limbo, Mother Goose, Papa Bear and Cinderella's mice finally got their happy ending yesterday along with several other fairy-tale figures. Left over from the long-closed Enchanted Forest theme park, the wooden and fiberglass characters had languished behind a chain-link fence in Ellicott City, beaten by the weather and vandals. This week, the company that owns the land announced it would donate the park's fairy-tale figures so they could entertain children at a nearby farm.
TRAVEL
By Tricia Bishop | November 18, 2001
California's countryside is known for its vineyards, but another fruit -- the olive -- is moving in on the grape's territory, and Sonoma Valley is giving it its due this year with an Olive Festival. Starting next month and running through February, the first annual festival highlights olive season in Sonoma, from harvest to press, beginning with a blessing of the olives Dec. 8 at the historic Mission San Francisco de Solano. The kickoff weekend continues with olive press demonstrations, a tasting bar for olives and olive oils, a culinary trip through local restaurants and wineries, and a Martini Madness contest, where bartenders will vie for the title of most olive-worthy martini maker.
NEWS
By Ryan Clark and Ryan Clark,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2001
Garland Hanson, an 18-month- old bearing a striking resemblance to Pebbles Flintstone - barefoot, wearing an orange dress with pink flowers, her hair pulled in a sprout atop her head - squeals as 20 people read aloud from the children's book Goodnight Moon. As she hears the story and watches as the pages are turned, she giggles and claps her hands. With all the noise, it's hard to believe this is taking place in the Enoch Pratt Free Library on Cathedral Street in Baltimore. But Garland is participating in Mother Goose on the Loose in the library's Day Room, part of the Meyerhoff Children's Garden.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2001
ELMONT, N.Y. - Even as Marylanders lament the loss of stakes races in their state, two Maryland horses vanned to New York and swept the stakes yesterday at Belmont Park. Stabled at Tapeta Farm in Cecil County, Fleet Renee reaffirmed her status as one of the country's leading 3-year-old fillies with a near-record performance in the Grade I, $250,000 Mother Goose Stakes. Her time of 1 minute, 47.19 seconds for 1 1/8 miles was the second fastest in 45 runnings of the race. Michael Dickinson trains the daughter of Seattle Slew at his farm near North East.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2001
Loretta Ames is just trying to do a good deed for geese, but the fates are conspiring against her. After she heard in 1989 that goslings nesting in Columbia's Guilford Industrial Park had been killed by a car, she persuaded Howard County officials to erect two geese-crossing signs. The signs, however, have not stayed put. Seven times, one or both have disappeared, falling prey to snowplows, contractors and thieves - especially thieves, who can't steal geese signs anywhere else in the county because Ames' pair is unique.
NEWS
By Nancy Knisley and Nancy Knisley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 27, 1998
Barely minutes into John "The Kinderman" Taylor's show at Baltimore County's Catonsville library branch, children in the audience are under his spell. They sway to the rhythm, clap to the beat, sing along and repeat the rhymes, and imitate his movements.The more inhibited adults are hard pressed to keep still in another successful performance by one of Baltimore's most popular children's entertainers.Parents who wonder if the reading they do with their children has any long-term effects only have to hear Kinderman's story.
NEWS
By Gennifer Choldenko | June 21, 2000
Editor's note: A determined bovine makes her dreams of reaching for the stars come true. Mother Goose ... what a bag of feathers she is. She makes it sound so easy. Nine hundred forty-one pounds of cow meat, not counting the udder, catapults 240,000 miles to jump over the moon -- and what does that old goose woman write? One lousy line -- not even a whole poem. First of all, you may not know this, but we horses jump over the moon on a regular basis. We begin training from a very early age. Which is just what we were doing when this cow started hanging around.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 2000
THE GLAD cries of "snow day!" are countered by some disappointment at Laurel Woods Elementary. Reading teacher Nancy Gifford has heard complaints from disappointed children in the Mother Goose class. The children aren't learning nursery rhymes. These sophisticated kindergartners and first-graders are participants in "Mother Goose Asks Why" -- a five-session, weekly after-school program teaching parents about science in classic children's literature. The program "teaches parents how to look at books to teach scientific concepts and habits, to look at the ideas in the books," Gifford said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.