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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The theater scene in Washington during this frigid winter has been pretty hot. The latest example is "Mother Courage and Her Children," the classic Bertolt Brecht play in a potent revival at Arena Stage starring Kathleen Turner. Director Molly Smith, who guides this atmospheric, in-the-round production with a sure hand, has said she wanted to remind people of the "Her Children" in the title so that Brecht's searing anti-war, anti-hypocrisy sentiments are not the only take-homes. That goal has been realized, thanks to Turner's rich portrayal.
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By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 3, 2014
If great theater is your thing, Arena Stage is the place to be. The Southwest Washington, D.C., theater has been on a roll this season, with exceptional plays that covered a broad range of subjects, featuring well-known cast members. I've always felt that Arena Stage's productions have reflected the diversity of the nation's capital and this season has been no exception. I haven't seen the entire lineup, but many this season fall in that category, such as the by-popular-demand repeat performance of the explosive "One Night With Janis Joplin.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | November 17, 1994
Steve Tesich's "On the Open Road" sits somewhere on the road between "Waiting for Godot" and "Mother Courage and Her Children."Its two main characters, a cultured gentleman named Al and an (( ex-boxer named Angel, are reminiscent of rich Pozzo and his servant, Lucky, in the Beckett play. And the cart of war spoils they're pulling could easily be the one pulled by Mother Courage in the Brecht play.Furthermore, the opening image in the Playwrights Theatre of Baltimore's production looks as bleak as anything in Beckett or Brecht.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The theater scene in Washington during this frigid winter has been pretty hot. The latest example is "Mother Courage and Her Children," the classic Bertolt Brecht play in a potent revival at Arena Stage starring Kathleen Turner. Director Molly Smith, who guides this atmospheric, in-the-round production with a sure hand, has said she wanted to remind people of the "Her Children" in the title so that Brecht's searing anti-war, anti-hypocrisy sentiments are not the only take-homes. That goal has been realized, thanks to Turner's rich portrayal.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 6, 1992
Life is sweet, isn't it? Of course it isn't. It's hard, bitter, disappointing and, oh yes, it stinks.It is, however, better than all other forms of existence -- all none of them. It's it and that's that.And Mike Leigh's new comedy, "Life Is Sweet," is also it and that's that. The film, which won last year's National Film Critics Award, opens today at the Charles. Its deepest irony is that it's anti-ironic: Leigh really means that life is sweet if you've got the guts and the character to make it so, outer circumstances being what they are; his examination of a British working-class family paints a picture of shining through far more effectively than the overblown Hollywood horsefeather pile of that title.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 5, 1992
Life is sweet, isn't it? Of course it isn't. It's hard, bitter, disappointing and, oh yes, it stinks.It is, however, better than all other forms of existence -- all none of them. It's it and that's that.And Mike Leigh's new comedy, "Life Is Sweet," is also it and that's that. The film, which won last year's National Film Critics Award, opens today at the Charles. Its deepest irony is that it's anti-ironic: Leigh really means that life is sweet if you've got the guts and the character to make it so, outer circumstances being what they are; his examination of a British working-class family paints a picture of shining through far more effectively than the overblown Hollywood horsefeather pile of that title.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 3, 2014
If great theater is your thing, Arena Stage is the place to be. The Southwest Washington, D.C., theater has been on a roll this season, with exceptional plays that covered a broad range of subjects, featuring well-known cast members. I've always felt that Arena Stage's productions have reflected the diversity of the nation's capital and this season has been no exception. I haven't seen the entire lineup, but many this season fall in that category, such as the by-popular-demand repeat performance of the explosive "One Night With Janis Joplin.
NEWS
May 10, 1998
NOT ALL CHILDREN will be giving their mothers cards, potted flowers and handmade tokens of love and gratitude today.Here in Maryland, 644 children legally free for adoption are languishing in the care of the state, waiting for mothers (and fathers) who want them. Another 11,000 sit in foster care, group homes and the homes of relatives; at some point many of them will be adoptable, too.Finding mothers for them is not easy. These are older kids, many with special needs, some in sibling groups that cannot be broken up. It takes courageous, committed people to raise such children.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 12, 2001
The matchmaker who brought Hungarian director Janos Szasz to the attention of Washington's Arena Stage, where his vision of "A Streetcar Named Desire" opened last weekend, is none other than Baltimore's own Philip Arnoult. Best known as the founder of the Theatre Project, Arnoult is the director of a program called the Eastern & Central European Theatre Initiative. This project identifies young directors who can work in English and pairs them with American theaters. Szasz is one of more than 20 directors Arnoult has identified so far. "If I had to gamble right now, I would say that there will be close to 18 major productions coming out of this project in the next four years," the globe-trotting Arnoult said during a rare stopover at his Baltimore home earlier this week.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | December 15, 1992
BERLIN -- Poet-playwright Bertolt Brecht never had any modest doubts about the value of his work, but even he might have been surprised at the $7 million or so being paid for his literary archives.The city of Berlin has agreed to pay Brecht's heirs a reported 11 million marks, about $7 million at today's rates, for the collection of manuscripts, correspondence, notebooks and diaries.Like Baltimore's H. L. Mencken, Brecht, the author of the modern stage classics "The Threepenny Opera," "Mother Courage" and "Galileo," seemed to save every scrap of paper he ever wrote a word on.And he wrote a lot of words -- at least 40 stage plays or adaptations, several movies, hundreds of poems and one novel, not to mention journals, letters, political essays, criticism and a virtual encyclopedia of the theory and practice of theater.
NEWS
May 10, 1998
NOT ALL CHILDREN will be giving their mothers cards, potted flowers and handmade tokens of love and gratitude today.Here in Maryland, 644 children legally free for adoption are languishing in the care of the state, waiting for mothers (and fathers) who want them. Another 11,000 sit in foster care, group homes and the homes of relatives; at some point many of them will be adoptable, too.Finding mothers for them is not easy. These are older kids, many with special needs, some in sibling groups that cannot be broken up. It takes courageous, committed people to raise such children.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | November 17, 1994
Steve Tesich's "On the Open Road" sits somewhere on the road between "Waiting for Godot" and "Mother Courage and Her Children."Its two main characters, a cultured gentleman named Al and an (( ex-boxer named Angel, are reminiscent of rich Pozzo and his servant, Lucky, in the Beckett play. And the cart of war spoils they're pulling could easily be the one pulled by Mother Courage in the Brecht play.Furthermore, the opening image in the Playwrights Theatre of Baltimore's production looks as bleak as anything in Beckett or Brecht.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 6, 1992
Life is sweet, isn't it? Of course it isn't. It's hard, bitter, disappointing and, oh yes, it stinks.It is, however, better than all other forms of existence -- all none of them. It's it and that's that.And Mike Leigh's new comedy, "Life Is Sweet," is also it and that's that. The film, which won last year's National Film Critics Award, opens today at the Charles. Its deepest irony is that it's anti-ironic: Leigh really means that life is sweet if you've got the guts and the character to make it so, outer circumstances being what they are; his examination of a British working-class family paints a picture of shining through far more effectively than the overblown Hollywood horsefeather pile of that title.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 5, 1992
Life is sweet, isn't it? Of course it isn't. It's hard, bitter, disappointing and, oh yes, it stinks.It is, however, better than all other forms of existence -- all none of them. It's it and that's that.And Mike Leigh's new comedy, "Life Is Sweet," is also it and that's that. The film, which won last year's National Film Critics Award, opens today at the Charles. Its deepest irony is that it's anti-ironic: Leigh really means that life is sweet if you've got the guts and the character to make it so, outer circumstances being what they are; his examination of a British working-class family paints a picture of shining through far more effectively than the overblown Hollywood horsefeather pile of that title.
NEWS
By Eileen Canzian and Eileen Canzian,Staff Writer | May 9, 1992
Looking smart in a crisp white and navy sheath, Nakia Stephens strode to the stage of her high school auditorium and invited her mother to join her. Nakia spoke with confidence as she introduced Delores Stephens to the audience. Then Nakia, 17, faced her mother and prepared to recite a thank-you speech.Instead, she burst into tears. "Mom, I really love you," Nakia finally managed through sobs, her face buried in the older woman's arms. Her mother, too, was crying.There were many moments like that, and many tissues, as Baltimore's Paquin School held it's annual Mother's Day celebration yesterday.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | October 13, 1994
Washington -- HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON's office is surprisingly modest, not much larger than that of a junior partner at a big law firm, with a poster-size photograph of her husband, looking serious and a bit tired, gazing down from the wall. The size of the room belies her influence. The framed photograph of Eleanor Roosevelt on a table bespeaks it.Her staff says reports that she has withdrawn from a policy-making role after the crash-and-burn denouement of health care reform are simply wrong.
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