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Mother And Son

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By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,Los Angeles Times | August 25, 1996
"The Art Fair," by David Lipsky.Doubleday. 271 pages. $22.50.The novel's narrator, Richard Freely, is a precocious youngster who is shuttled between his artist mother in Manhattan and his writer father in Los Angeles. Their split was brought on by their mother's sudden arrival in the art world.Before she gained fame, their lives were idyllic, but as her work garned attention, the family life crumbled.If Lipsky's book reads so remarkably assured, perhaps it's because his story is drawn from real life: He is the son of painter Pat Lipsky Sutton.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Upset that his mother would not pay off his debt to drug dealers, Genesis Collins Jr. set himself on fire and embraced her, leaving Audrey Collins with burns that ultimately killed her, prosecutors said. On Wednesday, a Baltimore jury convicted Collins, 42, of manslaughter and other charges in connection with the attack. He faces as much as 40 years in prison when he is sentenced in March. Jeremy Reed, Genesis Collins' nephew and Audrey Collins' grandson, said the family felt some relief that he had been convicted but that there was no real feeling of closure.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
Eight years after losing a bitter custody battle in Circuit Court and fleeing the state with her 5-year-old son, a former Finksburg mother was back in Carroll County last night to face kidnap charges.Sharon Elaine Wimperis, 50, was arrested Aug. 5 on a federal warrant at her apartment near Detroit by FBI agents. She was charged with unlawful flight to avoid prosecution for parental kidnapping.Federal marshals escorted her yesterday to Maryland, where she was turned over to state police and taken to Westminster to appear before District Court Commissioner Emmett V. Jones last night.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
By yesterday afternoon, state medical examiners concluded what Baltimore County police already suspected: Ruhama Jane Murphy, 44, and her son, Larry Bruce Price, 22, committed suicide in a Washington Boulevard motel room.But no one seemed to know why."We don't know," said Mary Lou Fisher, Mrs. Murphy's mother. "We just don't know . . . and I'll probably never know why."Police found Mrs. Murphy and her son about 6:15 p.m. Monday in the bathroom of a locked motel room. The pair checked into the room Sunday night, said E. Jay Miller, county police spokesman.
NEWS
By Joanne Wasserman and Joanne Wasserman,New York Daily News | December 29, 1992
NEW YORK -- Rosemary Holmstrom and her son, C. J., wer watching Magic Johnson talk about the AIDS virus on television when the bright, active 7-year-old asked his mother a natural and innocent question."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | September 2, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- For almost 30 years, Sherry Cowa searched for her son, not knowing what had become of the red-haired toddler she last saw when he was just a year old.Then three weeks ago, the phone rang and the suburban Mission Hills woman learned her son was alive -- and looking for her."I still can't believe it, even though he's right here," said Ms. Cowan, 48, of David Dills, 30, of North Augusta, S.C., after a friend helped reunite the mother and son Friday as a surprise for Mr. Dills.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | January 11, 1994
The death of Virginia Kelley, President Bill Clinton's mother, is especially stunning because she was such a survivor. It is a shame to observe that this lively woman did not live to see her son complete his first year in office.She married five times, twice to the same man (Mr. Clinton's stepfather). Three of her husbands died, one in a car accident, one of alcoholism, one of diabetes. One son went to jail for drug possession. These are heavy blows for anyone to bear.It is common to hear that she bore up because she's a strong woman.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 12, 2009
Debbie Phelps has cast off the mantle of "America's Mother" for something a little more Sir Thomas More. Henceforth, the world's most famous swimming mom is to be known as "A Mother for All Seasons." That's the title of her memoir, which hit bookstores last week. Why not invoke the saint who stood up to Henry VIII in a tale about a single mom who raised an Olympic phenom? Only Phelps doesn't lose her head, even in the part - page 272 of the 274-page book - about Michael Phelps' bong picture.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 22, 2004
BOSTON - I'm not supposed to like Desperate Housewives. It's either post-feminist or pre-feminist. It's too racy or too retro. It's either an example of the backlash or a product of the cultural collapse. The show's steaminess has the American Family Association railing against its sex in the suburbs. Its locker room promo on Monday Night Football has the FCC in wardrobe malfunction mode. So sue me. This show had me from hello. It wasn't the mystery or the lingerie. It was Lynette. In the very first episode, the woman who left her high-powered job to be overwhelmed by four kids ran into a coiffed and manicured former co-worker who asked how she likes her new life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aria White and Aria White,Sun reporter | July 5, 2007
In a time of war, an American woman named Rosie worries about her son, a guard overseas, while a Middle Eastern woman named Zaira worries about her son, a taxicab driver who has gone missing. In the play The Blessed Mothers of War, the two mothers are miles apart but their stories are similar because of their worry and fear for their sons. "I think my play will evoke a great deal of emotion from audiences," said Ty DeMartino, the author of the play, which is one of nine included in this year's Baltimore Playwrights Festival.
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