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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 17, 2011
The Rev. John Anson "Jack" Mote, retired pastor of the old Wilson Memorial United Methodist Church, died of pancreatic cancer Oct. 4 at his home on Camano Island, Wash. The former North Baltimore resident was 91. Born in Piqua, Ohio, he was a graduate of what was then Western Maryland College who had served in the Army during World War II. He opposed the war on moral grounds "In 1944, when he asked to be released from the Army as a conscientious objector, Mote was a 24-year-old attendant at Valley Forge General Hospital in Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 17, 2011
The Rev. John Anson "Jack" Mote, retired pastor of the old Wilson Memorial United Methodist Church, died of pancreatic cancer Oct. 4 at his home on Camano Island, Wash. The former North Baltimore resident was 91. Born in Piqua, Ohio, he was a graduate of what was then Western Maryland College who had served in the Army during World War II. He opposed the war on moral grounds "In 1944, when he asked to be released from the Army as a conscientious objector, Mote was a 24-year-old attendant at Valley Forge General Hospital in Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
February 2, 2004
WITH APOLOGIES to the Book of Matthew: How can the General Assembly hope to remove the mote from another's eye but fail to consider the beam in its own? The question is not entirely metaphorical. Optometrists are once again calling on the legislature to let them perform more eye-related procedures. One of them involves an instrument called an Alger Brush, which works much like a drill and is used to remove tiny foreign objects from the cornea. The optometrists also would like to be able to use topical steroids and antiviral drugs, treat a form of glaucoma and dispense more types of prescription antibiotics.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
COLLEGE PARK — Maryland's president said Friday that the search for outgoing athletic director Debbie Yow's successor would begin immediately and that his impending retirement should not affect the process. Yow, 59, announced Friday that she was leaving to take the same position at North Carolina State and was introduced at a news conference in Raleigh. She signed a five-year, $350,000 contract. Maryland President C.D. "Dan" Mote Jr., who is set to retire Aug. 31, expressed concern about delaying the search.
NEWS
By Childs Walker | childs.walker@baltsun.com | February 16, 2010
C.D. "Dan" Mote Jr. will step down as president of the University of Maryland, College Park at the end of August after 12 years leading the state's flagship public university. During Mote's tenure, the university increased its research funding by 150 percent, to $518 million last year; completed the two largest fundraising campaigns in its history; and increased its applicant pool by 78 percent. Mote also oversaw a building boom that added Comcast Center, a 130-acre research park, a performing arts center, bioscience and engineering buildings, and several other large academic halls.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1999
With the pomp peculiar to academic circumstance, C.D. "Dan" Mote Jr. was formally inaugurated as the 27th president of the University of Maryland, College Park yesterday.Lance W. Billingsley, a UMCP alumnus and chairman of the Board of Regents of the University System of Maryland, officially named Mote president, presenting him with the chain and medallion that symbolizes the office as Gov. Parris N. Glendening and system Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg looked on.The ceremony came eight months after Mote took over the job, a delay not unusual for such affairs, in part because they take so long to plan.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
Officials at the University of Maryland, College Park believe that C. D. "Dan" Mote Jr.'s appointment as the 27th president could make the difference between keeping the college at status quo and turning it into a top-notch public institution.College officials said Mote presents unique qualifications that they believe are critical to meeting their main goal-having College Park join the ranks of the University of Virginia, the University of Illinois and the University of Michigan."I think he will make people feel connected at College Park," said John Lippincott, associate vice chancellor for advancement for the Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1998
The University of Maryland football team is not the only group from College Park making the journey up Interstate 95. On the day before the Terrapins were to take on Georgia Tech at the Ravens stadium, new school President C. D. "Dan" Mote and a small entourage came to town for a series of visits clearly designed to build bridges to Baltimore.Attending a variety of meetings, mainly with business leaders, Mote delivered the message that has become his theme in two months on the job: The state has to recognize that a major research university is necessary to sustain economic growth.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
COLLEGE PARK -- Like an eager freshman, C. D. "Dan" Mote Jr. showed up slightly early yesterday to assume the presidency of Maryland's flagship university and declared himself ready to lead it to national preeminence -- once he figures out East Coast ways.Clad in a gray double-breasted suit, Mote, former vice chancellor at University of California, Berkeley, strolled into the white-columned Administration Building at University of Maryland, College Park about 15 minutes before he was expected for a small reception to meet members of his staff.
NEWS
November 20, 1999
IMAGINE connecting to the Internet and opening your e-mail to find something worse than an annoying electronic ad: The anonymous message threatens injury. Or worse."Get ... off campus ... If you stay, you better watch your back!!!" was part of the profanity-laced message a University of Maryland, College Park newspaper editor received this year.The editor, Rahman Culver, was the letter's target because of his race. This was one of a dozen reported hate crimes that UMCP has recorded this year.
NEWS
February 17, 2010
F or an unassuming engineering professor, C.D. "Dan" Mote Jr. took on the presidency of the University of Maryland, College Park in 1998 with a bold agenda: to bring Maryland's flagship university into the same class as the nation's crown jewel state schools, like the University of Virginia and the University of California. A dozen years later, as Mr. Mote announces his plans to step down in August, that no longer seems so far-fetched. Mr. Mote's singular accomplishment as leader of the state's largest public university campus was to establish what he called "an expectation of excellence" - the idea that College Park could be a first-choice school for the state's most talented students and take its place among the top tier of public research institutions.
NEWS
By Childs Walker | childs.walker@baltsun.com | February 16, 2010
C.D. "Dan" Mote Jr. will step down as president of the University of Maryland, College Park at the end of August after 12 years leading the state's flagship public university. During Mote's tenure, the university increased its research funding by 150 percent, to $518 million last year; completed the two largest fundraising campaigns in its history; and increased its applicant pool by 78 percent. Mote also oversaw a building boom that added Comcast Center, a 130-acre research park, a performing arts center, bioscience and engineering buildings, and several other large academic halls.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | January 18, 2010
The presidents of Maryland's leading public universities are modestly compensated compared to peers in other states, according to a survey being released today by the Chronicle of Higher Education. C.D. "Dan" Mote Jr., president of the University of Maryland, College Park, made $498,284 in salary and retirement benefits, according to the survey of the 2008-2009 school year. But Mote ranked 60th among 186 public university presidents across the nation. William E. Kirwan, chancellor of the university system, made $490,000, almost $60,000 less than the previous year, and turned down $100,000 in deferred salary.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | July 29, 2009
The University of Maryland, College Park will freeze hiring and reduce its staff through retirements and possible layoffs as it attempts to cut $14.6 million from its 2010 budget, President C.D. "Dan" Mote wrote Monday evening in an e-mail to the university community. The budget reductions will be part of the state university system's $37.8 million contribution to $281 million in cuts ordered by Gov. Martin O'Malley to begin covering a massive shortfall for this fiscal year. Mote noted that the university had already trimmed its $420 million budget by about 2.5 percent but said further cuts are unavoidable.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Michael Dresser, Thomas W. Waldron and Marego Athans, and news researcher Robert Schrott contributed to this article | June 2, 1998
A vice chancellor and distinguished engineering professor who is an accomplished fund-raiser at the University of California, Berkeley, is expected to become the next president of the University of Maryland, College Park, sources said last night.Clayton Daniel Mote Jr., vice chancellor of university relations and a longtime professor of mechanical engineering at Berkeley, was expected to be introduced today as the new president of UM's flagship campus, according to sources.Donald N. Langenberg, chancellor of the University System of Maryland, would not confirm Mote's selection, but said there would be an announcement today.
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