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By Peter Spiegel and Christian Berthelsen and Peter Spiegel and Christian Berthelsen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 30, 2007
The top U.S. military commander in Iraq warned Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in May that the country's biggest dam, just up the Tigris River from the northern city of Mosul, is at risk of collapse, putting the city's 1.7 million people in danger of being inundated by a 65-foot flood wave. The letter from Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, co-signed by the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, is included in an audit to be published tomorrow. The report found that little or no progress has been made to shore up the Mosul Dam since the May warning, largely because a $27 million project funded by U.S. reconstruction money has been plagued by mismanagement and possible fraud.
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NEWS
By Sudarsan Raghavan and Sudarsan Raghavan,The Washington Post | February 25, 2009
BAGHDAD - Two Iraqi policemen fired on four U.S. soldiers and two Iraqi interpreters inside a police station in the northern city of Mosul yesterday, the third deadly attack on American soldiers in two weeks in the still-volatile provinces of Nineveh and Diyala. One American soldier and one of the interpreters were killed, the U.S. military said. The three other soldiers and second interpreter were injured. An Iraqi police captain at the scene was also slightly injured, said police officials.
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NEWS
By Sudarsan Raghavan and Sudarsan Raghavan,The Washington Post | February 25, 2009
BAGHDAD - Two Iraqi policemen fired on four U.S. soldiers and two Iraqi interpreters inside a police station in the northern city of Mosul yesterday, the third deadly attack on American soldiers in two weeks in the still-volatile provinces of Nineveh and Diyala. One American soldier and one of the interpreters were killed, the U.S. military said. The three other soldiers and second interpreter were injured. An Iraqi police captain at the scene was also slightly injured, said police officials.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2008
BAGHDAD -- When smoke from the thunderous blast cleared yesterday, little remained of an apartment building in the northern city of Mosul that officials say had been turned into a huge house-bomb that blew up as Iraqi troops searched for weapons. The blast killed as many as 15 people, injured scores, and came on the day that a car bomb in another northern city killed five. The attacks highlighted the challenge facing U.S. and Iraqi forces as they drive insurgents out of areas farther south, such as Baghdad and Anbar province, only to see them surface in the north.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 2005
MOSUL, Iraq - On a last-minute vote drive yesterday in northwest Mosul, Lt. Brock Hershberger approached a man wearing an olive-colored suit and brown leather shoes. "Have you voted yet?" Hershberger asked through a translator. The man responded that he'd heard the lines were long. Of the problems that U.S. and Iraqi forces anticipated in the run-up to elections in this breeding ground for the insurgency, long waits to cast votes were not at the top of the list. "He won't have to wait more than 15 minutes," Hershberger said.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 23, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A forbidden love affair that ended in a young woman's death by stoning led to religiously motivated bloodshed yesterday when gunmen dragged members of a tiny religious minority off a bus and killed 21 of them, Iraqi police and witnesses said. The incident in the northern city of Mosul was shocking in its brutality and frightening for the specter it raised - violence between Muslims and non-Muslims, aggravating the already volatile conflict involving Sunni Arabs and Sunni Kurds.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2008
BAGHDAD -- When smoke from the thunderous blast cleared yesterday, little remained of an apartment building in the northern city of Mosul that officials say had been turned into a huge house-bomb that blew up as Iraqi troops searched for weapons. The blast killed as many as 15 people, injured scores, and came on the day that a car bomb in another northern city killed five. The attacks highlighted the challenge facing U.S. and Iraqi forces as they drive insurgents out of areas farther south, such as Baghdad and Anbar province, only to see them surface in the north.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 18, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Masked gunmen in the turbulent Iraqi city of Mosul ambushed a car carrying Turkish police officers yesterday, shooting three to death and decapitating a fourth who tried to run away, witnesses said. In a daytime attack reminiscent of the killing in March of four U.S. security contractors in Fallujah, militants looted the policemen's weapons and set the car ablaze before escaping. After the attack, residents stood around the burning white Chevrolet Caprice as the bodies lay face down in the street.
NEWS
By Christine Spolar and Christine Spolar,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 24, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Two American soldiers were shot and mutilated yesterday by assailants who attacked their vehicle in the northern city of Mosul in another day of insurgent violence against coalition forces, said U.S. military sources. The men were traveling in a white four-wheel-drive car when a brick or stone was thrown at the vehicle, causing it to stop, military sources said. A crowd of armed assailants quickly overwhelmed the car. Soldiers from a nearby compound tried to rescue the men, military officials said, but before they could get there, a mob killed the two soldiers, leaving their bodies in the street.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 16, 2003
MOSUL, Iraq - At least 10 Iraqis were reported killed and 16 injured yesterday in a clash in northern Iraq that Marines called a gunbattle and Iraqis described as the shooting of unarmed civilians. The deaths further complicated the troubled arrival of U.S. troops in Mosul, a city considered a center of Iraqi nationalism. The shooting began as Marines tried to secure the main government building. A first attempt to secure the building by a dozen U.S. Special Forces soldiers Friday ended with the Americans coming under fire and retreating.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Christian Berthelsen and Peter Spiegel and Christian Berthelsen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 30, 2007
The top U.S. military commander in Iraq warned Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in May that the country's biggest dam, just up the Tigris River from the northern city of Mosul, is at risk of collapse, putting the city's 1.7 million people in danger of being inundated by a 65-foot flood wave. The letter from Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, co-signed by the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, is included in an audit to be published tomorrow. The report found that little or no progress has been made to shore up the Mosul Dam since the May warning, largely because a $27 million project funded by U.S. reconstruction money has been plagued by mismanagement and possible fraud.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 23, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A forbidden love affair that ended in a young woman's death by stoning led to religiously motivated bloodshed yesterday when gunmen dragged members of a tiny religious minority off a bus and killed 21 of them, Iraqi police and witnesses said. The incident in the northern city of Mosul was shocking in its brutality and frightening for the specter it raised - violence between Muslims and non-Muslims, aggravating the already volatile conflict involving Sunni Arabs and Sunni Kurds.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | February 14, 2007
ARLINGTON, Va. -- With the House debating this week how much "nonbinding" grief to lay on President Bush about Iraq, I e-mailed a soldier friend of mine for his impressions of the increasingly amplified protests. Army Sgt. Daniel Dobson, 22, of Grand Rapids, Mich., is on his second tour in Iraq. I asked him what he thinks of the growing opposition to the war. Writing from Mosul, he says he appreciates the freedom Americans have to protest, but adds: "The American military has shown a stone-cold professional veneer throughout the seething debate raging over Iraq.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,Los Angeles Times | February 10, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- A U.S. airstrike accidentally killed eight members of a Kurdish security force and injured another six who were manning an observation point near a political office in the northern city of Mosul, Iraqi officials said yesterday. The U.S. military said that five, not eight, Kurdish police officers died in the attack, which it said had been aimed at bomb-makers affiliated with al-Qaida. U.S. military officials also said that three American soldiers had been killed yesterday during combat in western Anbar province.
NEWS
By JOHN DANISZEWSKI AND JOSH MEYER and JOHN DANISZEWSKI AND JOSH MEYER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- U.S. and Iraqi forces acting on a tip about an al-Qaida cell stormed a house in a middle-class neighborhood of Mosul and, after a six-hour clash, all eight people inside were dead -- including three who killed themselves with vest bombs, a police general said yesterday. Four Iraqi police also died. Authorities were trying to determine whether any of those killed was Iraq's No.1 terror suspect, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the leader of al-Qaida in Iraq. In Washington, U.S. officials said they had no indication that al-Zarqawi had been killed or captured, and that efforts to identify the dead were inconclusive as of yesterday evening.
NEWS
By Ashraf Khalil and Monte Morin and Ashraf Khalil and Monte Morin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 11, 2005
MOSUL, Iraq - A suicide bomb exploded in a crowd of funeral mourners gathered outside a Shiite Muslim mosque yesterday, killing at least 47 people. The blast, which tore through the large group packed in a tent next to Mosul's Two Sadr Martyrs Mosque, was the latest in a string of bloody attacks across Iraq that have killed at least 100 Iraqis, most of them civilians, in recent days. Earlier yesterday in Baghdad, two police commanders were assassinated in separate ambushes and gunmen killed four cloth merchants, apparently because they sold fabric to be used for Iraqi Army uniforms.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 2003
MOSUL, Iraq - Last week, Lt. Gen. Tahaseen Rafan was an Iraqi domestic intelligence official running a network of spies in Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq. Today he is frightened, alone and in hiding, one of thousands of members of Saddam Hussein's security apparatus who have abruptly gone from predator to prey. Early yesterday afternoon, Rafan and five midlevel Iraqi military and intelligence officials arrived at the makeshift U.S. military base here to negotiate their surrender and ask for protection.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 21, 2003
MOSUL, Iraq -- The palace has been plundered, the law courts burned, the government center sacked. So when the residents of Mosul seek justice or mercy, there's only one place left to go: the Duty-Free Shop at Mosul Airport. This small concrete building has -- with the addition of a few plastic chairs -- become the temporary headquarters for 1,500 American troops stationed here and the de facto seat of government for this city of 1.7 million people. The soldiers have set up here, at the airport, because gunfire is continuing in the center of the city.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 2005
MOSUL, Iraq - On a last-minute vote drive yesterday in northwest Mosul, Lt. Brock Hershberger approached a man wearing an olive-colored suit and brown leather shoes. "Have you voted yet?" Hershberger asked through a translator. The man responded that he'd heard the lines were long. Of the problems that U.S. and Iraqi forces anticipated in the run-up to elections in this breeding ground for the insurgency, long waits to cast votes were not at the top of the list. "He won't have to wait more than 15 minutes," Hershberger said.
NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Colin McMahon and Evan Osnos and Colin McMahon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 27, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A U.S. helicopter on a mission supporting Sunday's national election crashed amid sandstorms in western Iraq early yesterday, killing 30 Marines and one Navy sailor, the military said, marking the deadliest day for U.S. forces since the invasion in March 2003. The death toll climbed to 37 when six other American troops - four of them believed to be Marines from a Baltimore-based unit - were killed yesterday in unrelated incidents as insurgents seeking to disrupt the vote launched a wave of attacks that killed or wounded dozens of Iraqis.
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