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NEWS
August 26, 1993
U.N. relief trucks enter MOSTAR with food and medicine, a U.N. spokeswoman said.NATO's political committee agreed in BRUSSELS to take tougher action to get supplies to Muslims trapped in Mostar.Bosnia pleaded at THE HAGUE for the World Court's protection, accusing Serbia and its ally Montenegro of genocide, rape and torture.
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NEWS
By Peter Slavin and Peter Slavin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 1998
MOSTAR, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The Old Bridge was narrow and less than 100 feet long; it could be crossed on foot in seconds. But when carefully plotted Croatian artillery shells sent it crashing into the Neretva River four years ago, the shock waves traveled far and wide.Stari Mos (Old Bridge in Serbo-Croatian) had stood for more than 400 years and was the most famous landmark in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Erected on the Neretva River on the outermost reaches of the Ottoman Empire, it marked the place where the Islamic East met and mingled with the Christian West.
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FEATURES
By Dennis Drenner | March 24, 1996
"Where are you going?" The border guard's expression was as grim as the landscape outside the bus. Just hours before, I had been in charming old Split on Croatia's sunny Dalmatian coast. Strolling palm-lined promenades along the Adriatic, I found it hard to imagine Iwould be spending the evening in a town devastated by war. I told the guard I was heading to Mostar and he moved on down the aisle. As the bus pulled away and crossed into Bosnia-Herzegovina, the gray sky was quickly turning black.
FEATURES
By Dennis Drenner | March 24, 1996
"Where are you going?" The border guard's expression was as grim as the landscape outside the bus. Just hours before, I had been in charming old Split on Croatia's sunny Dalmatian coast. Strolling palm-lined promenades along the Adriatic, I found it hard to imagine Iwould be spending the evening in a town devastated by war. I told the guard I was heading to Mostar and he moved on down the aisle. As the bus pulled away and crossed into Bosnia-Herzegovina, the gray sky was quickly turning black.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 19, 1992
MOSTAR, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The ruins of the dream of a peaceful future for Balkan republics are nowhere more visible than in the rubble of this historic town.Serbian forces have blown up six major bridges, burned hundreds of homes and businesses and wrecked both of the principal religious centers, a modern Catholic cathedral and a stately 15th-century mosque.From nearby hills, Serbian gunners are still shelling Mostar, but there is little left to destroy. Streets once lined with tour buses are now littered with the debris of war, and a community that was once thought to symbolize friendship among Serbs, Croats and Muslims is now gone, a victim of the bitter hatreds fueling this war.Probably no large town in Bosnia and Herzegovina has suffered as much damage as Mostar.
NEWS
March 23, 1994
U.N. officials said the Serbs were pulling back guns that the United Nations said violated the heavy weapons exclusion zone around SARAJEVO.Croatia and rebel Serbs holding a third of Croatian territory opened cease-fire talks in ZAGREB with their positions far apart and warnings of military action if the negotiations fail.A U.N. plane flew 22 tons of food and medicine into TUZLA, the first relief flight to the city in almost two years of war. Regular flights could begin within three weeks.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 25, 1993
Two Cumberland-area men just home from a mission of mercy to rescue war-wounded children in the besieged Bosnian city of Mostar tell of a sometimes harrowing and dramatic journey in the Balkan war zone.The men -- a retired Army lieutenant colonel and a tax consultant -- joined a British-American contingent of doctors and civilians who, under the protection of United Nations forces, evacuated 22 wounded men, women and children Sunday from Mostar in southern Bosnia.Leaving the area, vehicles in an elaborate mercy mission stretched about 2.5 miles.
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