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NEWS
September 5, 2007
Man, 53, accused of illegal logging A man accused of cutting down trees near a protected wetlands in Easton has been charged with illegal logging, a misdemeanor. Charles Peterson is accused of violating the state's nontidal wetlands and sediment control laws last summer. It was not immediately clear whether the 53-year-old owned the land where he cut the trees. The charge was announced yesterday by Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who campaigned on a pledge to prosecute more environmental cases.
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NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | September 2, 2007
The Maryland Department of Agriculture is boosting its mosquito control efforts in the wake of what health officials fear could be the first human case of West Nile virus in the state this year. Agriculture officials have more than doubled mosquito trapping on the Lower Eastern Shore, said Cy Lesser, the department's chief of mosquito control. The move followed a report last week by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on what it suspects is a human case of the virus. Officials declined to say much about the case except that it involves a resident of Worcester County.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | September 2, 2007
The Maryland Department of Agriculture is boosting its mosquito control efforts in the wake of what health officials fear could be the first human case of West Nile virus in the state this year. Agriculture officials have more than doubled mosquito trapping on the Lower Eastern Shore, said Cy Lesser, the department's chief of mosquito control. The move followed a report last week by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on what it suspects is a human case of the virus. Officials declined to say much about the case except that it involves a resident of Worcester County.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | September 2, 2007
The Maryland Department of Agriculture is boosting its mosquito control efforts in the wake of what health officials fear could be the first human case of West Nile virus in the state this year. Agriculture officials have more than doubled mosquito trapping on the Lower Eastern Shore, said Cy Lesser, the department's chief of mosquito control. The move came after the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene reported last week what they suspect is a human case of the virus. Officials decline to say much about the case except that it involves a resident of Worcester County.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance Frank D. Roylance,Sun Reporter | June 14, 2007
Many of us learn it by bitter experience. Now scientists say it's true. Some people, thanks to their genetics, behavior, diet or some poorly understood combination of factors, have body chemistry that draws mosquitoes like linebackers to a loose football. Others just seem invisible to the bugs. "I am irresistible to mosquitoes," said Michele Karanzalis, 33, a research project manager from Overlea. "I just try to stay inside a lot ... I start to get panic atacks after a while when I feel like I'm getting bit too much."
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | May 5, 2007
Our yard is red clay over white clay. Rain just sits there. If I till in organic matter and lay sod, would that solve the problem? Chances are you'll have difficulty maintaining a lawn until you solve the drainage problem. A grade of 1/2 inch per 50 feet would carry rain off your lot, but a better solution is to divert rain to a rain garden. Rain-garden plants thrive on periodic flooding, while rain slowly percolates into the soil. The Prince George's County Department of Environmental Resources has a good brochure called "Rain Gardens: The Natural Solution."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | March 26, 2007
Jason Rasgon wants to assure the world of one thing: His genetically modified mosquitoes do not have eyes that glow in the dark. Yes, under fluorescent bulbs, some of the mosquitoes at the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute will glow a bright red or green. When magnified, they look like space aliens. But Rasgon and colleagues say it's what you can't see that makes these bugs important: They're prototypes for a generation of genetically modified mosquitoes that could be released into the wild to help eradicate malaria.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 23, 2006
Until last weekend, I was not the kind of guy who went around staring at car luggage racks. Until then, I was content to let luggage racks lie, hibernate or whatever they do when they are not in use. I have since learned that if you want to improve your gas mileage, get rid of annoying wind noise and feel frustrated, you should attempt to adjust your car's luggage rack. My car-rack awareness heightened when I had to transport a large object, a kayak, on the roof of my car. Some months ago, my wife purchased two used kayaks in the belief that kayaking was an activity we could enjoy together, blissfully paddling into the sunset.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 26, 2006
This dry-as-toast summer might be tough on lawns, but it also has put the kibosh on mosquitoes. For a time, I thought the recent downturn in mosquito bites was a personal issue, that my flesh had lost its appeal. Then I telephoned Cy Lesser, Maryland's top gun in the battle against mosquitoes, and he confirmed that the downturn in itching and scratching is a statewide phenomenon. "Overall, this has been a mild season for mosquitoes," said Lesser, the chief of the Mosquito Control Section of the state Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | August 13, 2006
When I was about 10, my parents learned that it was actually more economical to send me to Girl Scout camp in the wilds of Maine - central Maine, Stephen King's Maine - than it was to keep me in Haagen-Dazs cones for a summer at home in Connecticut. From the depths of the garage, they dragged a down sleeping bag, bug netting and other mildewed camping supplies I never knew they owned. So what if I'd bailed on the Brownies in third grade? "You're going," they said. By the last hour or so of the drive up the New England coast that June, the pine trees were thick enough to strain the sunlight from the air. Finally, our tires crunched on a gravel parking lot, and I - pudgy, cautious - climbed out to gawk at what looked like a primitive civilization overrun by little girls.
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