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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Pikesville and Catonsville are the next area locations to be sprayed for mosquitoes in response to cases of West Nile Virus, Baltimore County Department of Health officials said Friday. The Maryland Department of Agriculture will spray parts of Pikesville Sept. 18 and parts of Catonsville Sept. 19. Officials recommend residents and their pets stay inside during the spraying, after 7:30 p.m., of Biomist 30-30, though the active ingredient permethrin is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State health officials reported Thursday they have confirmed the first case of West Nile Virus in Maryland for the year. The infected adult lives in the suburbs of Washington. The virus has also been detected in a Washington-area horse, and in special mosquito traps placed in Harford, Montgomery, Prince George's and Talbot counties. Officials at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said the human case was not unexpected - there were 16 reported cases last year. But they reminded people to take precautions by avoiding areas where mosquitoes are prevalent, covering their skin with clothes and hats, using insect repellent, and if possible, avoiding outdoor activities during mosquitoes' most active times at dusk and dawn.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 28, 2014
As Harford County and state health agencies track West Nile virus and other diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, such as chikungunya and dengue viruses, the Harford County Health Department cautions residents to take appropriate measures to reduce their risk of infection. According to the health department, people can reduce the risk of being infected with WNV by using insect repellent and wearing protective clothing to prevent mosquito bites. "Prevention is key and there are actions individuals can take to reduce the risk of mosquito-borne infection," Harford County Health Officer Susan Kelly said in a release.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A company sprayed my neighbor's yard for mosquitoes, but when I called the company it admitted that its chemical killed all kinds of insects, including pollinators and beneficials. So I don't want to do that, but we are getting eaten alive by mosquitoes all day! Help! The Asian tiger mosquito, which bites ferociously during the day, has forced people to reexamine and get smarter about mosquito strategies. We agree that preserving beneficial and pollinating insects must be a priority, and some of those beneficials even eat mosquitoes!
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A company sprayed my neighbor's yard for mosquitoes, but when I called the company it admitted that its chemical killed all kinds of insects, including pollinators and beneficials. So I don't want to do that, but we are getting eaten alive by mosquitoes all day! Help! The Asian tiger mosquito, which bites ferociously during the day, has forced people to reexamine and get smarter about mosquito strategies. We agree that preserving beneficial and pollinating insects must be a priority, and some of those beneficials even eat mosquitoes!
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 16, 2002
Malaria-infected mosquitoes have been found on an uninhabited Montgomery County island in the Potomac River that is a state wildlife refuge, the second time this month that infected mosquitoes have been found on an uninhabited county island. Montgomery County health officials said the mosquitoes were discovered in one of 10 traps on Van Deventer Island, a small tract just south of the site on Selden Island where malaria-infected mosquitoes were discovered last week. Lynn Frank, chief of public health services for Montgomery County, said the mosquitoes were trapped Thursday and tested Friday by researchers from the Bethesda-based Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 26, 2006
This dry-as-toast summer might be tough on lawns, but it also has put the kibosh on mosquitoes. For a time, I thought the recent downturn in mosquito bites was a personal issue, that my flesh had lost its appeal. Then I telephoned Cy Lesser, Maryland's top gun in the battle against mosquitoes, and he confirmed that the downturn in itching and scratching is a statewide phenomenon. "Overall, this has been a mild season for mosquitoes," said Lesser, the chief of the Mosquito Control Section of the state Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
September 23, 2001
The state, in cooperation with the county Health Department, will spray for mosquitoes, which could be infected with the West Nile virus, in the Brooklyn Park, Brooklyn Heights and Belle Grove communities and adjacent areas of Baltimore from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. tomorrow, weather permitting. Residents should stay indoors during spraying in their immediate areas and for 30 minutes afterward. Windows and doors should be closed and air conditioners turned off. Permethrin is the federally approved insecticide that will be sprayed at low dosage from state trucks.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | July 22, 2001
Q. A cousin of mine eats raw garlic every day, sometimes twice a day. He is never bothered by mosquitoes or any other insect. Just thought you would find this bug- repellent remedy amusing. A. Your cousin probably keeps more than mosquitoes away. We can't imagine that too many people would get real close, either. Over the years, many readers of this column have confirmed your cousin's experience. One woman wrote that she was especially attractive to mosquitoes and couldn't go out without a heavy dose of DEET repellent.
NEWS
By Joanna Poncavage and Joanna Poncavage,The Morning Call | July 4, 2004
The battle of man vs. mosquito has spawned a new tool: clothes that appear normal in every way, except for their built-in repellent that keeps bugs at bay. "This is the first new development in personal insect protection since DEET," says Haynes Griffin, CEO of Buzz Off Insect Shield of Greensboro, N.C. DEET is the active ingredient in most tick and insect repellents. The active ingredient in Buzz Off clothing is permethrin, a synthetic version of pyrethrum, a natural insect repellent derived from the flowers of a plant in the chrysanthemum family.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 28, 2014
As Harford County and state health agencies track West Nile virus and other diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, such as chikungunya and dengue viruses, the Harford County Health Department cautions residents to take appropriate measures to reduce their risk of infection. According to the health department, people can reduce the risk of being infected with WNV by using insect repellent and wearing protective clothing to prevent mosquito bites. "Prevention is key and there are actions individuals can take to reduce the risk of mosquito-borne infection," Harford County Health Officer Susan Kelly said in a release.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
State health officials are urging Marylanders to be wary of mosquito-borne diseases like West Nile virus and, now, the dengue-like virus chikungunya - raising concerns after it was reported in a Florida man Thursday. The chikungunya case is believed to be the first that was contracted in the U.S.; other cases had been reported in people who had recently traveled to areas where the virus is prevalent. That is raising concern over the possible spread of the virus, which is not usually fatal but can cause fever and debilitating joint pain and cannot be treated.
EXPLORE
Staff Reports | September 17, 2012
Baltimore County is conducting mosquito sprayings this week in Catonsville and next week in Pikesville in the wake of two human cases of West Nile Virus being discovered in the county. Weather permitting, sprayings are scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 19, in parts of Catonsville (click for map); and Mondays, Sept. 24 and Oct. 1, in parts of Pikesville (click for map). Officials said spraying would take place after 7:30 p.m. and residents in those areas should stay indoors during spraying to minimize direct contact with the spray.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 17, 2012
Spraying to control mosquitoes in Baltimore County's Pikesville neighborhoods has been postponed until next week, health officials said. The state Department of Agriculture will spray Sept. 24 and Oct. 1 in parts of Pikesville. Spraying in Catonsville will be Sept. 19 and 26.  Spraying will begin after 7:30 p.m. each evening.(More information and maps can be found at the county health department website .) Agriculture officials recommend residents and their pets stay inside as not to come in direct contact with the spray, Biomist 30-30.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Pikesville and Catonsville are the next area locations to be sprayed for mosquitoes in response to cases of West Nile Virus, Baltimore County Department of Health officials said Friday. The Maryland Department of Agriculture will spray parts of Pikesville Sept. 18 and parts of Catonsville Sept. 19. Officials recommend residents and their pets stay inside during the spraying, after 7:30 p.m., of Biomist 30-30, though the active ingredient permethrin is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
HEALTH
From Sun staff and news services | August 30, 2012
Maryland health officials are reporting the state's first death from the West Nile virus. State health department spokeswoman Dori Henry said Thursday that the department is not releasing any details on the death. Maryland has had 13 cases of West Nile virus this year. Nineteen cases, including one death, were reported last year, and 23 cases the year before in Maryland. Federal officials announced Wednesday that West Nile cases nationwide are up 40 percent since last week and may rival the record years of 2002 and 2003.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 9, 1993
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:*Ed "Spider" Olshesky, Berlin: Please be more careful when you use entomological references in the future. If you encourage the killing of spiders, would we not have an abundance of mosquitoes?COMMENT: No. You forget there is a balance to nature. God made spiders so there wouldn't be too many mosquitoes. Then God made people so there wouldn't be too many spiders. Then God made cigarettes so there wouldn't be too many people.*Arlene Banks, Glyndon: In your article on [Joseph Gallardo, convicted of rape, whose house was burned down by his neighbors hours before he got out of prison]
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | June 3, 2001
Q. I read about people getting bitten by mosquitoes, and I want to tell you my experience. For the past 20 or 30 years I have been taking (along with other vitamins) a half-tablespoon of brewer's yeast a day. Since I started taking this every morning I have never been visited by mosquitoes. My wife gets bites during the warmest part of the summer, but mosquitoes leave me alone. Maybe it is my Swedish blood they don't like. They must love my Sicilian wife. A. Yeast is rich in B vitamins, especially thiamine.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker | August 16, 2012
A second person in Maryland has been diagnosed with West Nile Virus this year, according to state health officials. The state doesn't identify victims of the disease, but said the diagnosis was in the Washington suburbs, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. This year's first case of West Nile Virus was diagnosed in an adult male in Central Maryland The viruswas also detected in a pool of mosquitoes collected in Montgomery Countyby theU.S. Department of Defense.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 10, 2012
An adult in Central Maryland has been diagnosed with this year's first case of West Nile Virus, according to The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The virus was also detected in a pool of mosquitoes collected in Montgomery County by the U.S. Department of Defense. Most people with West Nile virus do not show symptoms. Those who do will have a fever, headache, body aches, skin rash and swollen lymph glands 3 to 15 days after a bite by an infected mosquito.
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