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By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
The cable television subcontractors who pierced a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. natural gas pipeline in Westminster two hours before a nearby house exploded last month did not violate any state occupational health and safety guidelines, according to state officials.In a report released yesterday, Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH) said that neither Apollo Trenching Co. -- the Howard County company whose digging equipment struck the gas main Jan. 19 -- nor Prestige Cable Television of Maryland put employees at undue risk that afternoon.
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NEWS
February 25, 2010
We agree with workplace researchers Kathleen M. McPhaul, Jane Lipscomb and Matthew London and George Myers of the Maryland Professional Employees Council (Readers respond, Feb. 22 and Feb. 23) that we must do all we can to prevent workplace violence wherever it occurs. This is why Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH), in conjunction with federal agencies, has been proactive in assessing risks at public agencies and assisting them in developing prevention programs. While we cannot discuss MOSH's ongoing investigation of the homicide that occurred on the grounds of the Cheltenham youth detention center, we are fully aware of the significant risk of job-related violence faced by health care and social service workers.
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NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | June 26, 1991
Charging willful and repeated lack of safety precautions for workers building the Waterloo Place downtown apartment complex, the state has fined three contractors more than $130,000.Workers at the North Calvert Street project were in continuous danger of falling from heights of up to 100 feet, working without guardrails, safety lines, nets or other protection, the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health office charged.In some cases, only a thin plastic tape was strung across the elevated work platforms to warn employees of the potential danger of falling, MOSH said.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
On Tuesday, July 26, 2005, MOSHE D. FORTE' passed away at Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital. Friends may call the WYLIE FUNERAL HOME P.A. of BALTIMORE COUNTY, 9200 Liberty Road, Monday from 5 to 8 PM. Services will be held Tuesday at the above mentioned funeral home 10:30 AM Wake 11:00 AM Funeral. Internment Following Inquiries @ www.wyliefuneralhome.com or 410-655-9200.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | January 23, 1991
In a settlement with the state, McGregor Printing Co. has agreed to pay a $1,340 fine in the death of a worker last March.The amount is $2,015 less than the Maryland Occupational Safety and Healthoffice originally fined the manufacturer of computer and business forms.Of the five charges against McGregor, the state agreed to drop one, merge two others and reduce fines on the remaining two, saidDavid B. Weisgerber of Westminster, a lawyer for the company.MOSH had charged McGregor with safety violations after Martin L. Collins, 36, of Westminster died when he fell or was pulled into a shredder he was operating at the plant on New Windsor Road.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | January 9, 1992
The state has fined Bethlehem Steel Corp. $4,995 for safety violations involving lift trucks at the Sparrows Point complex, vehicles implicated in the deaths of two workers over the past three years.The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health office issued the citations after investigations prompted by complaints by the Steelworkers union and by the Oct. 1 death of David Hamlett, an inventory checker in the tin mill who was crushed between a runaway tractor and a 50,000-pound coil of steel.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
State inspectors reviewing conditions at a Baltimore County maintenance facility where a dozen workers have become ill since fall gave it a clean bill of health yesterday but criticized county officials for not being more open with workers about conditions at the plant.Maryland Occupational Safety and Health inspectors told county officials, union representatives and a half-dozen county workers in a meeting at the Glen Arm Maintenance Facility that it is a safe place to work."What I told them was that I found it's a safe building," said Lewis Ramage, a MOSH inspector.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Scott Wilson contributed to this article | May 26, 1996
A 32-year-old Glen Burnie man was killed at a U.S. Gypsum plant in Southeast Baltimore yesterday morning after he fell into a chute in which rocks are dumped before being crushed for wallboard.Brian Arnold of the 600 block of Washington Ave. was working at the plant in the 5500 block of Quarantine Road when the accident happened. No one witnessed the 1 a.m. incident, plant officials said."Obviously, we're deeply saddened," said Matt Gonring, spokesman for U.S. Gypsum. "Our first priority is a safe workplace.
NEWS
June 24, 1991
Jan. 20 of last year, Joseph Nelson, 57, fell 15 feet to his death during steel-making operations at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant.The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health agency fined the company $5,000, saying that the poor condition of a floor may have contributed to the accident.For several years, the Sparrows Point plant has been a frequent target of MOSH inspectors. Few other workplaces have been investigated so often in the wake of fatalities and other serious accidents.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1998
Sheriff John Brown won't pay a fine for smoking on the job, but state health officials will monitor his office to be sure his secondhand smoke doesn't endanger his employees.Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH) officials issued a 14-page report yesterday of their investigation into an anonymous referral received in April. In the report, MOSH concluded that Brown smoked in his Westminster office in violation of state law and issued a citation, but recommended no penalty.The MOSH report said a referral, which is akin to a complaint, was made after an April 16 photograph published in The Sun showed Brown seated at his office desk with a cigarette in his right hand and a pack of cigarettes, lighter and ashtray on his desk.
NEWS
October 16, 2004
On Wednesday, October 13, MORRIS "MOSHE" PELTA; beloved husband of Necha Pelta (nee Jablonka); loving father of Getel Cohen of Owings Mills, MD, Avi Pelta of Owings Mills, MD and Jacob Pelta of Portland, Oregon; father-in-law of Audrey Pelta and Mati Cohen; adored grandfather of Risa and Daniel Cohen, Joshua and Rikki Pelta. Services at SOL LEVINSON @ BROS, INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd at Mt. Wilson Lane on Friday, October 15, at 9 AM. Interment Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery-Berryman's Lane. Please omit flowers.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - No parents, no teachers, no principals or any other real authority figures are anywhere in sight, so behavior isn't closely monitored much here. Naturally, nearly everyone cuts loose, lets it all hang out - literally and figuratively. Giggling girls run in and out of the men's restroom. Reefer smoke mingles with the greasy scent of fries and chicken fingers. Welcome to the HFStival at RFK Stadium. This is the annual all-day rock extravaganza put on by the "true alternative" rock station, 99.1 WHFS and sponsored by the likes of Miller Lite, Subway, Bacardi, Starbucks and others.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2003
The Gaithersburg company that employed the three workers who drowned in a flash flood Wednesday in Woodlawn had been cited for more than 30 workplace safety violations, state and federal records show. A crane operator for Concrete General Inc. was killed on the job in 1988. Another employee's arms had to be amputated after he was shocked by a power line in 1982, and a Concrete General worker was rescued after a trench collapsed in 1995. Most recently, in 2000 and 2001, the company was cited six times for trenching violations, according to Maryland Occupational Safety and Health records.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2003
The Gaithersburg company that employed the three workers who drowned in a flash flood Wednesday in Woodlawn had been cited for more than 30 workplace safety violations, state and federal records show. A crane operator for Concrete General Inc. was killed on the job in 1988. Another employee's arms had to be amputated after he was shocked by a power line in 1982, and a Concrete General worker was rescued after a trench collapsed in 1995. Most recently, in 2000 and 2001, the company was cited six times for trenching violations, according to Maryland Occupational Safety and Health records.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2003
An error in the building process appears to be the cause of the partial collapse last week of a parking garage under construction in downtown Westminster, the city official overseeing the project said yesterday. Engineering consultants who have advised the city throughout construction of the $2.85 million Longwell garage found no problem with the concrete or the crane that was used to lower 30-ton slabs into place, said Thomas B. Beyard, Westminster's director of planning and public works.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2003
An error in the building process appears to be the cause of the partial collapse last week of a parking garage under construction in downtown Westminster, the city official overseeing the project said yesterday. Engineering consultants who have advised the city throughout construction of the $2.85 million Longwell garage found no problem with the concrete or the crane that was used to lower 30-ton slabs into place, said Thomas B. Beyard, Westminster's director of planning and public works.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
In a sweeping and controversial change, Maryland Occupational Safety and Health officials will offer exemptions from surprise inspections to those employers who develop their own in-house inspection and safety programs.MOSH officials said they expect to formally inaugurate the program -- which has been given a three-month trial at a Southern Maryland construction site -- within the next few days."We're going to change directions," said John P. O'Connor, commissioner of state's Labor Division, which oversees MOSH.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2003
Some construction resumed yesterday at the site of a parking garage collapse in Westminster, but workers were prevented from going near the area where a concrete slab that was to have been part of the roof-level parking deck came crashing down a day earlier. One of the men who was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center after the accident was recuperating yesterday at his West Virginia home, said the man's son-in-law and co-worker, who added that the other co-worker flown out was more seriously injured and is likely to miss eight weeks of work.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
Employees in the Howard County Clerk of the Circuit Court's office are not getting enough fresh air to breathe, state occupational health inspectors have concluded. A report from Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH), which was recently sent to Clerk of the Circuit Court Margaret D. Rappaport, says that carbon dioxide levels in her offices in Howard's Circuit courthouse are higher than they should be. It also notes other factors that might affect the air quality in the historic, 19th-century building - including dead pigeons decomposing on the roof near cooling fans and "mold growth" in the building.
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