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Moses Sheppard

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NEWS
August 21, 2002
SHEPPARD PRATT Health System is sending mixed signals -- some hopeful, some worrisome -- about the fate of historically noteworthy structures that may not survive if it builds a new inpatient psychiatric hospital on its Towson campus. Prompting optimism is Sheppard Pratt's addition of prominent New York architect Robert Stern to its design team and Mr. Stern's published comments that the team will respect the "sacred landscape" even though "a few bits and pieces are going to be removed."
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 23, 1991
The stone gatehouse in the 6500 block of N. Charles St. that is the entrance to the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Health System looks like the handiwork of the Brothers Grimm.Sheppard-Pratt accepted its first patient 100 years ago. Since then, the hospital has helped thousands of patients, including Zelda Fitzgerald and Judy Garland.Few Baltimoreans have ever traveled through the gatehouse, down the lane and past the banks of blooming rhododendron bushes that cling to the sides of a steep hill.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
Worried that the use of historic Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital in Towson could change as mental health treatment shifts to more outpatient care, a preservation group plans to capture the renowned facility's history on film.Historic Towson Inc. received a $1,000 grant last week from Baltimore County Historical Trust Inc. for the project, which has drawn the interest of Emmy-winning cinematographer Richard Chisolm, who has agreed to work on the documentary.As the film's format is being developed, Historic Towson is seeking photos, home movies and anecdotes from neighbors, former staff and patients who stayed at the hospital, particularly in the 1940s and 1950s.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1999
Stanley Katzenstein, a downtown picture-framing business owner, died Sunday of cancer at his Mount Washington home. He was 59. Mr. Katzenstein was the second generation of his family to run Ludwig Katzenstein, a company founded in 1940 by his father at Hopkins Place and Pratt Street. About 15 years ago, the shop moved to Scarlett Place on East Pratt Street, and the family opened a branch in Lutherville. "It seemed there wasn't an office in downtown Baltimore that didn't have a picture they framed," said James L. Pierce, owner of a Charles Village framing studio.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1999
The two most elegant and prestigious buildings in Towson are known simply as A and B.No fancy names were necessary for the identical twins perched atop a wooded ridge at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital. With their six-story towers, lattice-work balconies and majestic bay windows, they spoke for themselves. One was built for men, the other for women. Both were hailed as part of the movement toward more humane treatment of the mentally ill in 1891.Those days are long past.In the world of managed health care, the 14-foot ceilings, Tiffany stained-glass windows and cozy sun rooms no longer fit.Over the next few years, officials at Sheppard Pratt plan to build a more modern facility on the west side of the sprawling 100-acre campus -- closing two of the nation's oldest buildings still in use at a mental institution.
NEWS
By Steven S. Sharfstein | April 26, 2011
Sheppard Pratt's announcement of plans to purchase a residence in Ruxton, near our flagship campus in Towson, has provoked an uproar from a segment of homeowners in this neighborhood. The residence, which will be licensed as a group home, is designed as a transitional living setting for adults who have been treated on a voluntary basis for one to two months at Sheppard Pratt's main facility for conditions such as serious depression and severe anxiety. The "not in my backyard" response from some community members reflects misconceptions and fears about mental illness and its treatments.
NEWS
May 10, 2011
After reading yet one more letter accusing the residents of Ruxton of prejudice, bigotry and outright snobbery, I am compelled to inject a little reality into the "soup" of emotion-based rhetoric. The proposed "retreat" on Labelle Avenue in Ruxton by Sheppard Pratt Health Systems is a commercial enterprise, and a very lucrative one at that. Nothing more. Furthermore, the CEO of Sheppard Pratt Health Systems, Dr. Steven S. Sharfstein, couldn't possibly have anticipated anything but "approval" of this venture, since the decision lies in the hands of the secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene who happens to be Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, his son. Let the readers draw their own conclusions.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
In an effort to keep the historic institution up to date, Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital hopes to build a new in-patient hospital on its sprawling 100-acre campus in Towson.As part of that move, Sheppard Pratt is seeking to rezone 38 acres, which would allow it to lease two 1891 Victorian-style inpatient buildings to non-hospital companies or organizations.The proposal is the latest change for Sheppard Pratt, which in recent years has had to deal with the ever-evolving treatment of mental illness, cutbacks on insurance reimbursements and fewer residential patients.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2000
$100 REWARD -- Ran away from the subscriber on Saturday, 7th August [1858], a NEGRO WOMAN, called Emeline, aged about 31 years, dark color, 5 feet high. She took with her a female child aged 22 months. I will give the above reward if they are returned to me, or lodged in jail within the State so I can get them. Henry Devries Marriottsville, Carroll county, Md. In pre-Civil-War Baltimore, runaway slaves such as Emeline found aid, rest and direction with the largest population of free African-Americans in the United State and a small but dedicated band of abolitionists.
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