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By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | May 17, 2007
MOSCOW -- The potted flowers and sprawling ferns were in place, arranged just so around the rock gardens and a few water-filled pools. Small tin lids containing a sugar-water mix -- the perfect meal for an insect -- had been laid out as if at a formal dinner. Three hundred tropical butterflies native to faraway lands had arrived for the big day: the grand opening of Moscow's House of Butterflies. And then something went radically wrong. People came. And touched. And touched some more.
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NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 15, 2007
MOSCOW -- Amid the worst chill in U.S.-Russian relations since the Soviet era, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice arrived in Moscow yesterday for talks aimed at convincing the Kremlin that a U.S.-planned missile shield in Eastern Europe poses no threat to Russia. Wariness of Washington's bid for an anti-ballistic missile defense system based in the Czech Republic and Poland has spread throughout Europe, but opposition to the plan is fiercest in Russia, where leaders remain convinced that the shield could one day provide the infrastructure for offensive weapons.
NEWS
May 5, 2007
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun about Queen Elizabeth II's visit should have described Jamestown, founded in1607, as the first permanent English colony in America. The "Lost Colony" of Roanoke was founded two decades earlier but did not last. The April 24 obituary of Boris Yeltsin carried a Moscow dateline and identified the writer as a Sun foreign reporter. The writer, Will Englund, was a Sun Moscow correspondent who reported on Yeltsin, and who is now on the newspaper's editorial board.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | April 29, 2007
Moscow -- Last week, as Russians buried Boris N. Yeltsin, many were reminded of the dramatic passage when Yeltsin discarded the authoritarian Soviet state in favor of capitalism and democracy. It also reminded them of the years of chaos and confusion that followed. That troubled period led Russians to embrace as president Vladimir V. Putin, a former KGB chief with a stern hand. Now, some here fear that under Putin the revolution Yeltsin instigated is going full circle, bringing Russia back to a state where dissent is smothered and overwhelming power is wielded from the top. Nowhere else in the world does democracy look the way it did in Moscow earlier this month, when as many as 9,000 riot police and troops -- some in camouflage, with truncheons, helmets, shields and a clear go-ahead to crack down -- beat back a peaceful anti-government protest.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 28, 2007
MOSCOW -- A Russian military helicopter crashed during a combat mission against separatist guerrillas in Russia's southern republic of Chechnya yesterday, killing at least 18 soldiers, authorities said. Initial reports said the craft was brought down by rebel fire, but officials said later that mechanical failure was more likely the cause. Three insurgents were also reported killed in the battle, but others apparently escaped into nearby mountains. The exact death toll remained unclear, with the Russian news agency RIA Novosti citing an unnamed local security source, reporting yesterday evening that 20 severely burned bodies had been found near the crash site.
NEWS
By Will Englund | April 28, 2007
Just as Boris N. Yeltsin's career was taking off - his first career, that is, as a Communist Party functionary - he received an order from Moscow that would tie him, however indirectly, to the one great crime that overshadowed all of Soviet history. Czar Nicholas II and his family had been murdered by their Bolshevik captors in the Ural Mountain city of Yekaterinburg, back on the night of July 16, 1918, and 59 years later, Mr. Yeltsin was ordered to destroy the house where that had happened.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 27, 2007
Moscow -- President Vladimir V. Putin said yesterday that in protest of U.S. plans for a missile defense system in Eastern Europe, Russia will suspend its observance of a treaty limiting the deployment of troops and conventional military equipment in Europe. The announcement, made in Putin's annual speech to parliament, ratcheted up tensions between Russia and the U.S. over the missile system, which Moscow views as a step toward building a much larger system directed at Russia and China.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 24, 2007
MOSCOW -- Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates took the Bush administration's campaign to install a missile defense system in eastern Europe to the highest levels yesterday, meeting with President Vladimir V. Putin, the plan's fiercest opponent. Gates emerged hopeful after meeting with Putin and senior Russian officials, saying the two sides had reached an agreement to set up a bilateral committee of experts to go over Russia's objections, including Putin's concern that the bases could be converted to other uses.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Foreign Reporter | April 24, 2007
CLARIFICATION The April 24 obituary of Boris Yeltsin carried a Moscow dateline and identified the writer as a Sun foreign reporter. The writer, Will Englund, was a Sun Moscow correspondent who reported on Yeltsin, and who is now on the newspaper's editorial board. MOSCOW -- Boris N. Yeltsin, the Russian leader who broke the Soviet Union and the system it had created, died yesterday in Moscow of complications from chronic heart problems. He was 76. Mr.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | April 14, 2007
MOSCOW -- With a judge's oath of office comes a duty to decide all manner of sober matters, including a man's guilt or innocence and how severe a sentence is appropriate to hand down. Now there's another weighty decision some Russian judges must take: whether to pack a pistol. The nation's Supreme Court, one of three high courts here, which has jurisdiction over some 30,000 judges, has purchased more than 12,000 semi-automatic weapons for those who serve on the bench as part of a nationwide campaign to keep them safe.
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