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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | March 17, 1993
SERPUKHOV, Russia -- Life in this gritty industrial city has changed so profoundly one year into President Boris N. Yeltsin's reforms that all of Moscow's squabbling politicians would have hard work trying to put the past back together again.Last week, the conservative Congress of People's Deputies that was meeting in Moscow, only 60 miles away from here, battered Mr. Yeltsin mercilessly. As the rest of the world watched uneasily, fearing a return to the old order, Serpukhov's leaders looked on in disgust, and strengthened their resolve.
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NEWS
By Deborah Stead and Deborah Stead,Special to The Sun | February 4, 1994
MOSCOW -- The closed-door trial of jailed Russian scientist Vil Mirzayanov was postponed again yesterday as it developed further into an early test of Russia's new constitution.Yesterday's trouble occurred when a dozen armed guards refused to escort the 58-year-old scientist through a courthouse corridor lined with journalists and human rights activists. Dr. Mirzayanov is being tried on charges of revealing Russia's advances in chemical weaponryThe guards were bringing him from the Matrosskaya Tishina prison, where he was taken Jan. 27 after refusing to participate further in his trial.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 23, 1995
MOSCOW -- Russians have always loved a political joke, mostly because the punch line has always been illicit. Before 1917, people could be put in jail for publicly mocking the czar.In Communist times, the slightest crack about party leaders landed people in Siberia. Under Mikhail Gorbachev's perestroika, the rules slackened a bit, and high-minded satire began slipping onto radio and television, but never anything as low-down and biting as the average Reagan skit on "Saturday Night Live."So most Russians were not entirely shocked last week when the government moved against the popular satirical puppet show "Kukly," a weekly program modeled on Britain's "Spitting Image" and France's "Les Guignols de Lenfo."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | January 22, 1991
MOSCOW -- In the wake of two deadly attacks by Soviet troops in the Baltic republics, representatives of all 15 republics are scheduled to meet in Moscow today in what may be a crucial showdown with President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.Anatoly Denisov, a Soviet legislator returning from a fact-finding mission to Latvia, predicted that in the aftermath of a rampage by riot troops in Riga Sunday night that left five people dead and 10 wounded, Mr. Gorbachev will try to impose direct presidential rule in the republic.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | October 3, 1993
MOSCOW -- Thousands of opponents of President Boris N. Yeltsin battled with police yesterday and burned barricades on a busy thoroughfare in the largest clash of Russia's 12-day-old political crisis.A traffic policeman was crushed to death by a car trying to break through a cordon of police gathered in front of the demonstrators, and two dozen police officers were injured -- two seriously, officials said.They said several protesters also were hurt, several seriously. Yeltsin opponents put the number of injured demonstrators at more than 60.The escalating violence intensified the pressure on negotiators for Mr. Yeltsin and the anti-reform parliament to defuse their standoff, as the Russian Orthodox Church struggled to mediate a compromise.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | September 16, 1992
MOSCOW -- A scientist formerly connected with the Soviet Union's chemical weapons development institute says that Moscow developed a top-secret, highly lethal binary nerve gas last year, despite promises by the government of Mikhail S. Gorbachev that it had stopped chemical weapons research several years earlier.The nerve gas is 10 times more effective at killing people than the U.S. equivalent, known as VX, the scientist, Vil Mirzayanov, said."Americans need to know about this," Dr. Mirzayanov said.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | February 27, 1994
MOSCOW -- The leaders of last October's bloody uprising walked free from Lefortovo Prison yesterday, smiling to the cheers of their supporters and ushering in a new phase of heightened political anxiety.Alexander Rutskoi, who once proclaimed himself president of Russia while announcing the resurrection of the Soviet Union, and Ruslan Khasbulatov, a former professor who urged soldiers to attack the Kremlin to depose Boris N. Yeltsin, stepped out into the late afternoon sunshine and immediately seized the attention of the nation.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 27, 1991
MOSCOW -- Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev has stripped Moscow's liberal city government of control of the capital's police force, and radicals declared they would proceed with a protest rally despite a new ban on demonstrations.Gorbachev acted yesterday, a day after his Cabinet prohibited all political meetings and protests in the capital until April 15 to prevent the rally planned tomorrow in support of Gorbachev's rival, Russian President Boris Yeltsin, whom conservatives are trying to oust.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
The Ryland Group announced yesterday that it plans to export factory-built homes to Moscow through a joint venture with two Russian partners.Ryland, which through its trading company already has an agreement to sell the prefabricated homes in St. Petersburg, hopes eventually to have homebuilding factories in several Russian cities.Officials of the Columbia-based company, one of the country's biggest homebuilding and mortgage-finance companies, said the profit potential of such ventures remains unclear.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | August 5, 1992
MOSCOW -- In one of those subversive turnabouts of history, a new radio station has taken to the air here. Its message is one of democratic reform and anti-Communism. Its target is Vietnam.Moscow, once the staunchest ally of Vietnam, is back in the business of exporting revolution."It's important for the Vietnamese people to learn the truth about what's going on in Russia, because it will surely help them shatter the Communist myths," said Irina Zisman, program manager of the station that calls itself the Voice of Freedom.
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