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By David Filipov and David Filipov,Boston Globe | September 19, 1994
Yury Krylov had sat down to watch "Schindler's List" expecting to see something along the lines of "Jurassic Park."Mr. Krylov, who plays for Russia's national water-polo team, could not have guessed the true content of Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning film, which debuted in Moscow last week. Like many Russians, he had never heard of the Holocaust. "I never knew that these things happened," Mr. Krylov said as he left the theater.Although Nazi troops killed as many as 2.9 million Jews on the territory of the former Soviet Union between 1941 and 1944, little has been said here about Hitler's efforts to exterminate the Jews.
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NEWS
October 4, 1993
Sept. 21 President Boris Yeltsin announces he is disbanding parliament and calls elections for December. Lawmakers vote to impeach Yeltsin and appoint Vice President Alexander Rutskoi as president.Sept. 22 Military, police stick with Yeltsin. Crowds cheer the president.Sept. 23 Gunmen try to storm military command post.Sept. 24 Yeltsin orders parliament's defenders disarmed.Sept. 25 Yeltsin says he won't use violence to end the standoff.Sept. 28 Hard-line protesters clash with riot police.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 5, 1991
MOSCOW -- The president of Armenia accused the Kremlin yesterday of the "monstrous crime" of ordering Soviet troops to shoot, loot and burn homes to drive Armenians out of two villages in neighboring Azerbaijan.Levon Ter-Petrosyan compared the assault on Getashen and Martunashen, in which he said at least 36 Armenians were killed last week, to the anti-Armenian pogroms in the Azerbaijani cities of Sumgait in 1988 and Baku in 1990.As Mr. Ter-Petrosyan spoke at a press conference here, an estimated 200,000 Armenians gathered in the republic's capital, Yerevan, to mourn victims of the violence.
NEWS
By -- Los Angeles Times | November 19, 1990
THE SOVIET Union is moving inexorably into an era of greater political pluralism and probably unavoidable regional fragmentation. Is the United States ready to deal with these profound changes?Pretty clearly it isn't.Washington, D.C.'s political and cultural efforts still focus largely on Moscow, and specifically on President Mikhail Gorbachev and his government, even as power becomes increasingly decentralized. More effective U.S. diplomacy demands broader contacts. That requires a more extensive U.S. diplomatic presence.
NEWS
By James P. Gallagher and James P. Gallagher,Chicago Tribune | January 4, 1995
MOSCOW -- The Russian army's miserable performance in Chechnya -- where tanks, fighter jets and attack helicopters are faltering against vastly outgunned bands -- has stunned Kremlin leaders and confronted them with unexpected new dangers.Three weeks after Russian forces rumbled off to war, confident they quickly would crush the breakaway regime in the tiny Muslim enclave, Russia's once proud and powerful army has been exposed as a paper tiger -- crippled by rivalries at the top and morale problems in the ranks.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | September 30, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russian legislators who found themselves outside the police lines when the government decided to cut off access to parliament Tuesday morning are now moving the struggle onto a much larger stage: the streets and subways of Moscow.Where once all the political attention was focused on the defiant parliament building also known as the White House, the government's blockade is now spawning demonstrations, speeches and meetings at various places throughout the city.They could, in the end, prove to be a more potent weapon against President Boris N. Yeltsin's government than the interminable sessions of the weakened rump parliament.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | November 7, 1992
MOSCOW -- With the moving van outside, U.S. Ambassador Robert S. Strauss gave a farewell assessment of Russia, its president and its future last night."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | July 18, 1991
MOSCOW -- With the smoldering war in the Caucasus heating up again, an international human rights delegation sharply criticized Soviet authorities yesterday for siding with the Azerbaijanis in their often violent efforts to expel Armenians.Delegation members said Soviet army units typically surround villages while Azerbaijani security forces circle overhead in helicopters, informing villagers that if they do not leave the province, they will be shot.Since the end of April, they said, more than 10,000 Armenians have been forcibly deported in this way from Azerbaijan.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | February 6, 1991
MOSCOW -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev declared Lithuania's plan to hold a referendum on independence "legally invalid" yesterday and ordered the republic to participate instead in a March poll on the preservation of the Soviet Union.Mr. Gorbachev accused Lithuanian leaders of trying to use Saturday's referendum "to organize support for their separatist aspirations."He said the non-binding plebiscite could only be interpreted as an attempt to block the March 17 unionwide referendum set by the Soviet parliament.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | March 17, 1993
SERPUKHOV, Russia -- Life in this gritty industrial city has changed so profoundly one year into President Boris N. Yeltsin's reforms that all of Moscow's squabbling politicians would have hard work trying to put the past back together again.Last week, the conservative Congress of People's Deputies that was meeting in Moscow, only 60 miles away from here, battered Mr. Yeltsin mercilessly. As the rest of the world watched uneasily, fearing a return to the old order, Serpukhov's leaders looked on in disgust, and strengthened their resolve.
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