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By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | September 16, 1992
MOSCOW -- A scientist formerly connected with the Soviet Union's chemical weapons development institute says that Moscow developed a top-secret, highly lethal binary nerve gas last year, despite promises by the government of Mikhail S. Gorbachev that it had stopped chemical weapons research several years earlier.The nerve gas is 10 times more effective at killing people than the U.S. equivalent, known as VX, the scientist, Vil Mirzayanov, said."Americans need to know about this," Dr. Mirzayanov said.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 17, 1991
MOSCOW -- A powerful explosion last night destroyed the headquarters of the Soviet Union's major anti-Communist opposition movement in what appeared to be the first political bombing in the capital in more than a decade.No one was injured in the blast, which occurred just after 10:20 p.m. in the old brick building occupied by Democratic Russia a few hundred yards from the Kremlin. One activist, Alexander Fonyakin, was in a back room at the time and leapt from a ground-floor window when the explosion occurred.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | February 12, 1992
Samarkand, Uzbekistan THE WORLD KNOWS legendary Samarkand as the golden treasure city of the great and barbaric Tamerlane, who conquered most of the known world in the 14th century and left this incredible city of turquoise and gold.But today even mythical Samarkand is falling to the imperatives of market thinking and exchange rates, and it is finally opening to the outside world on quite different terms than five centuries ago."This is our stock exchange and its name is Turkestan," Ahsham Razukob, told me brightly on one recent visit to fabled Samarkand.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 15, 2004
MOSCOW - Several hundred mourners attended a requiem service yesterday for an American journalist whose killing last week on a Moscow street has raised questions about the survival of press freedoms in Russia. Paul Klebnikov, editor of Forbes magazine's new Russian edition and the author of a book about Russia's buccaneer capitalists of the 1990s, was shot at least four times as he left work at twilight Friday. According to the latest reports in the Russian press, two men opened fire with pistols from a car as Klebnikov passed on the sidewalk.
NEWS
By Scott Bennett | June 7, 1991
NOW, brought to you courtesy of George Bush and Ji Baker: "Mr. Strauss Goes To Moscow."After a half-century of nuclear brinkmanship and proxy wars, the two global military superpowers are entering their most critical historical moment. Whether this moment leads back to a neo-Stalinist deep freeze, to civil war, to an authoritarian state resembling Gen. Augusto Pinochet's Chile, or upward toward Adam Smith's latest triumph is far from resolved.If the former, the Soviet Union will be a stunted Third World economic body carrying the weight of a First World military machine, and clinging to a secular religion now universally discredited.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer ZTC | January 20, 1992
Moscow ---AT A CORNER of the big, dull GUM department store on Red Square, the scene seemed at first to be just another money-raising charity scheme.The boy standing there all bundled up against the 15-below-zero cold had a round face. He seemed to be singing something -- some chant from the newly freed Orthodox Church, I immediately thought.Then, as I came nearer, the otherworld liness of this strange little drama assailed my senses. The boy was demented. ("Crazy, crazy," Russians standing there kept saying to me, pointing to their heads.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | June 22, 1995
MOSCOW -- Blink and you'll miss Harry Shaw's gas station hard along an old two-lane highway which, on its way to several old mining towns, passes through the scattering of houses that comprise Moscow.Take the time to drive on what is now called Route 935 up to one of three pumps under an overhanging roof, and you likely would see Harry Shaw emerge from the small brick building to pump your gas and offer a friendly hello.Mr. Shaw's been pumping gas here since he was a teen-ager. He's 85 now, and away from the station for several days while he recovers from a broken hip hurt in a fall.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 13, 1993
MOSCOW -- A Thriller it was not.Two hours late, feebly waving and unsteady on his feet after a long flight from Japan, Michael Jackson landed here last night to a frenzied but pint-sized welcome.Only about 300 Russian fans, mostly teen-age girls, turned out at the airport to greet the pop superstar who, clad in a black floppy hat and sunglasses, wearily and slowly descended the steps from his personal jetliner."Now I can die happy. I saw him, I saw Michael," art school student Tatyana Glutskikh, 17, blurted out in delight.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 24, 2007
MOSCOW -- Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates took the Bush administration's campaign to install a missile defense system in eastern Europe to the highest levels yesterday, meeting with President Vladimir V. Putin, the plan's fiercest opponent. Gates emerged hopeful after meeting with Putin and senior Russian officials, saying the two sides had reached an agreement to set up a bilateral committee of experts to go over Russia's objections, including Putin's concern that the bases could be converted to other uses.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Soviet government banned yesterday all political demonstrations in Moscow until mid-April to prevent backers of Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin from holding a mass rally to support him in a showdown with Communist Party conservatives this week.A government order, requested by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, prohibited the "Let Us Defend Yeltsin" rally that had been planned for central Moscow, just outside the Kremlin, on Thursday when the Russian Congress of People's Deputies begins a special session.
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